Rockler Dado Deal

Avenger 8'' x 42T Stack Dado Set 50 bucks with free shipping. http://www.rockler.com/avenger-8-x-42t-stack-dado-set-while-supplies-last
Buyer beware, reviews are mixed. From what I can tell you either get a good set or a bad set. Flip a coin and try them. :-)
Might be good way to get into dado set for cheap if you don't absolutely need the highest quality results possible.
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On Sunday, December 27, 2015 at 11:32:31 AM UTC-6, -MIKE- wrote:



I think that is a great way to look at a product like that. Years ago Wood craft had the same set, just a little more than that price. I put a set on my old radial saw and used it to dado shelves in utility cabinets and it wo rked great. At that time there wasn't another dado set I could find that w as less than $200, and Woodcraft told me the same thing... don't like 'em, bring 'em back. After building a wall of cabinets using that off brand set , I decided it was well worth the money I had in it.
The bottom of the cut wasn't as perfect as the $350 sets to be sure. And i t took a bit of fiddling sometimes to get a strange ridge that would show u p in the bottom of the cut. Once set it was fine. After all, if the dado bottoms weren't perfect, who would know? There certainly wasn't any differ ence in the performance of the final product. The face frames covered the dado/shelf/plywood edge detail on the front, and the backing on the back of the cabinets covered the back cuts. And if the bottom of the cuts were no t dead smooth, they just held a bit more glue.
Besides, for set up time, cost of the cutting apparatus, and quality of cut , for the little bit of cabs I do these days I use a router and jig with th e proper bit. No chipping, perfectly flat bottoms and the setup takes seco nds.
Robert
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On 12/27/15 2:24 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Buyer beware, reviews are mixed. From what I can tell you either get a

That's kind of the way I look at it for most dado/rabbet cutting. If they won't be seen, who cares? If they will be seen, clean up with the router or use the router first.
The TS is sooooo great for cutting them because of the horse power speed, and the waste/sawdust clean up is much more efficient for the most part.
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On 12/27/2015 2:37 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Keep this in mind. I used to use a router and straight bit, and I used a cheap wobble dado blade. I tried to not use them because the results were sub par. In particular cutting dado's/cutting cross grain on plywood. The edge of the cut is what matters to me most as these almost always show with my work and seldom do you see the bottoms of my dado's.
I have had the expensive set for 10+ years, Forrest 8" Dado King. You know I build a lot of furniture and most all of it is held together by rabbet's/lap joints, groves, and dados. There are no mechanical fasteners, nails or screws, until I add hinges, leveling feet, or I attach the backs. This includes the front and back face frames. That set has never been out to be resharpened.
I guess where I am going with this is that with the better results the more I use the set with out fear of screwing up a good piece of wood in particular when cutting a dado across the width of a $100 sheet of plywood.
I would agree that the set you are pointing to is inexpensive and may suite you well but if you have a need for a dado set that cuts well vs. having a set on hand for when you might need it you might want to keep in mind that the cheaper may not last long even if it does cut good.
Just something to think about. And there are plenty of good sets out there besides Forrest.

Uh-huh. ;~) I swear when I am building a project there are some days when I switch out the dado set with the WWII 2~3 times a day.
Let us know how that set does if you try it out.
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On 12/27/15 7:58 PM, Leon wrote:

Oh, I'm *not* getting it. I was just giving a head's up for those who might be looking to get into the stacked dado world for a very discounted price of admission.
I have a Freud set that lies somewhere between this set and the Dado King and it isn't as perfect as I'd like. It still leaves "bat ears" and one chipper isn't perfectly the same dimension as the others.
I have a possible custom cabinet build coming up. If I get the job, I will likely be purchasing a high quality dado set. I haven't decided between the Dado King, the Freud Dial-A-Width Dado, or the Infinity Dadonator.
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wrote:

Ridge Carbide? Wasn't there a discussion about Forrest's quality lacking, here recently?
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On 12/27/15 10:07 PM, krw wrote:

Ridge Carbide Dado-Master added to the list!
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II,RC Swingman has the Freud dial a width and likes it.
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On 12/27/2015 9:05 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

A dado set is one of my most used tools, using one on every project ... literally hundreds of cabinets and pieces of furniture.
Being that essential to the way I do things, I bought the Freud D-A-W quite a few years ago and will buy another if I ever wear this one out .. too convenient not to have to fuss with shims.
AAMOF, I donated my Amana, which was top $$ when purchased, to a wRec denizen because it hadn't been out of the box in years.
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On 12/27/2015 12:32 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

A few (10) years ago my BIL gave me a brand new 10", 60 tooth carbide Avenger Premium Pro blade and it is the one and only saw blade I ever owned that was no good. It could be the only Avenger blade that was no good, or it could be one of many, at any rate, it's hanging on the wall with about 10 minutes on it, probably to be made into a clock or something.
Just thought I'd mention it.
Also, I bought a Freud 10" dado set a while back, replacing a 7" set I'd used for years. I liked the 7" set better because the 10" is problematic to install and remove and aligning the blades correctly is a pia. I was looking at a 6" Olson dado set that the salesman (a woodworker) said was nice, but it looked way too small. Well, the 10" is way too big, and, as he mentioned, and I should have known, the big 10" blade is never needed for dado's, at least by me.
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Did you buy the 'imperial' model or the 'metric' model of Freud 10" data set. I bout metric since it was made for the metric ply I was using. You know that slop you get when cutting a 3/4" slot for a ""3/4"" that is thinner being metric. Or measure with a metric calipers and set the blades as needed.
Martin
On 12/27/2015 3:34 PM, Jack wrote:

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Are you yanking Jack's chain? :-)
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On 12/27/2015 9:34 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote:

You need shims to get to any nominal size. So for a 1/4" dado, you need a couple shims. I guess the set is imperial, the knives are 1/8 and 1/16th I believe, and always cut under the nominal size w/o shims. A 3/4" dado needs shims to get to actual 3/4".
My original dado set cut exactly to 1/4" with 2 blades, and had 1/16th and 1/8th blades, no shims at all, you had to make your own out of paper. Wood 50 years ago was both imperial and actually full size. 1/4" was, and 3/4" was...

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On 12/30/2015 9:45 AM, Jack wrote:

FWIW and with out much chance of exception the thickness of a sheet of 3/4" plywood from one stack will not be the same thickness from another stack a few weeks later. Just one more reason that I buy all of my, same thickness plywood, at the same time when starting a project.
I think shims would not be necessary if plywood could be made consistently the same thickness.
I even see inconsistencies in 12mm, AKA, 1/2" Baltic birch plywood thicknesses. I have to be careful when building with Baltic birch scraps.
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On Sun, 27 Dec 2015 11:32:27 -0600

most reviews are always mixed
did you get a set if so report back
otherwise i think i will pass i would rather buy a used set on ebay btw it has been shown that a coin will land more often on the side that starts facing up
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