Riser on 14" Grizzly bandsaw

I bought & installed the 6" riser to do some re-sawing. I installed it and put on a 1/2" woodslicer blade and it worked pretty well. However, the next day, the blade came off when I started it it and no amount of adjusting the wheels would keep the blade from running off the wheels almost immediately. I figured maybe the bolt had slipped or the washer had crept ant bent. I adjusted and tightened - no joy. The wheels seem aligned, no bends.
Could the frame have bent? it's cast Iron... Maybe the blade?
Any suggestions?
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How are you measuring the alignment of the wheels? If that's good, I'd check the tires, wheel runout, then the blade. You can get a general indication of a possibly bent or mis-aligned frame by the need to adjust the blocks and/or bearings when you min and max your cutting height. Hope this brings Joy to you. Tom
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Jeff:
I am sure you checked these already, but just to cover the basics: -Backed off all the thrust bearings, and guide blocks, etc. -Removed all Saw dust on tires -inspect (& clean) entire blade path for saw dust (pay close attention to far side where blade travels UP) -double check the bolt(s) on the riser to be torqued tight. -inspect (& clean if needed) the tension spring, as the tension gage reading could be giving a wrong reading. Spring could be broken. -Find and inspect the blade weld, as part of the welding could have separated. (This is really rare, and I doubt it would happen with a Woodslicer.) -Now re-tension the blade, and keep the guide blocks and thrust bearing backed all the way off, -Pluck the blade for the 'ping', or any other method, to verify the tension gage is in ball park of correct -double checked the back of the blade is darn near 90 degrees to table (mis-alignment of upper assembly to lower assemble left to right.) -run the saw to see if it is still wandering off the wheels.
Again, I am sure you went thru a similar list on your own, and I may have forgotten some of the points.
When you resaw, there is a lot of sawdust and heat built up on the blade. Some of the heat is caused by wood chips not getting removed from the kerf, and adding to the friction. If your resawing has burn marks, a lot of burn marks, all bets are off. Your blade could be damaged.
Phil
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Turns out it's the blade - I must have overtightened it and somehow managed to warp it in such a way that the diameter of the blade at the teeth is greater than that at the back of the blade.
wrote:

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