Ripping woes

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Sorry - I can't see this as the problem when ripping 2 inch solid .. or plywood .. Seems like a blade/fence issue. jt
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On Wed, 21 Aug 2013 20:12:46 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com wrote:

I wouldn't rule out a bad blade or bad arbor bearings. I'd start with a good blade and go from there.
Mike M
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Maybe so... but it sounds like an alignment issue to me. The first steps I'd take, in order, are: 1. Ensure the miter slot is parallel to the blade. 2. Ensure the fence is parallel to the miter slot. 3. Ensure the splitter is parallel to, and centered on, the blade.
If the problem still exists, then I'd look next at the blade, then at the arbor bearings (as indicated by axial runout on the blade).
Another thing worth looking at, perhaps: if this is a thin-kerf blade, maybe the splitter is thicker than the kerf, and is pulling the wood to one side? The wood should not (quite) touch the splitter on a rip cut.
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No square is accurate enough, imho. Use a very straight sharp edged straight edge at least the width of the saw hold it against a and a blade with absolutely no wobble. Thousandths count. Take a steel rule with 64thson it and adjust the table with the miter slot and straightedge to within half a 64th. Once done, this adjustment should hold for a very long time. Now, line up the rip fence to the miter slot. Make sure it is straight and NOT SLIPPING. Set the darn measuring pointer gauge while you are at it! ;-)
jim in nc
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The fence isn't square to the blade, back end of the fence is farther away.
Try cutting a board and clamping the offcut to the table without moving it. Lower the blade, move the fence to the offcut's edge and adjust it to be parallel with the offcut.
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Make sure the blade is parallel to the fence rather than the slot by measuring the leading edge of the blade and the trailing edge in relation to the fence.
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On 8/21/2013 11:22 AM, tom wrote:

FWIW you do actually want the fence parallel to the blade. Having said that make that adjustment AFTER making the slot parallel to the blade. If the fence is made parallel to the blade before making the slot parallel to the blade this will all be lost after making the slot parallel to the blade. Yuo want the miter gauge to slide parallel to the blade also. Adjusting the slot in most all cases throws off a previous fence adjustment.
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On 8/21/2013 3:42 PM, Leon wrote:

There are some table saws that you must first make the blade parallel to the slot. The principal part of these saws is the cast iron table. The slots are machined in and are not adjustable.
With these saws both fence and the blade must be parallel to the slot.
Once every thing is parallel, the miter gauge can be squared by putting into the slot and pushing it against the edge of the table.
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On Wed, 21 Aug 2013 16:22:30 -0400, Keith Nuttle wrote:

I've seen some pretty rough cast iron table edges :-). Perhaps the old cut a board and flip one half over trick might work better in those cases.
And I always do the squaring process by squaring the blade to the slot, and then the fence to the slot. Voila! - the blade is parallel to the fence.
But if you tend to use either slot as seems best, be sure the slots are parallel to each other. DAMHIKT.
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On 8/21/2013 8:17 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

It works on my 1969 10 inch Craftsman table saw.
I do all of my high tech alignment witt a 10 inch solid triangle and the saws cast iron table. The triangle was about $10 and checked for accuracy using the table slots.
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What do I need to start /stop

This is a problem with the equipment if you are keeping the boad against the fence during the cut. Blade is flexing or more likely trunion\motor mount is flexing because of something loose, bad\weak design, worn bearing, etc.
Physics dictates that if you keep the board against the fence not much else matters to get a straight cut. Not necessarily parallel to the edge but at least straight.
Something is flexing\moving and the distance between the blade and fence is changing through the span of the cut.
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On 8/20/2013 4:53 PM, ts wrote:

All the suggestions you will get forget to ask the one question:
What table saw are we talking about ? With what fence ?
It sounds like a machine setup issue but knowing what saw, makes a world of difference in the answer(s).
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It's a Delta contractors saw (circa 1992) with a shop fox (cheap upgrade) fence. I have a buddy coming over tonight so I'll get him to try it. I've also thought about the blade -- it's a Forrestt. I believe I've tried the Delta supplied blade with the same results.
I like the flex idea since the saw is old. Don't they last forever :). Maybe it's time i can talk to my SO into a Sawstop.
4 close misses - they were small accidents. although with the last one immeadiate care did have to call the surgeon in to suture my thumb by the nail and nail bed. The tech, about my son's age, said "you're probably going to be like my dad and go back home and continue working. Aren't you?" :)
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ts wrote:

Did you deduce anything that helps make a 5th or 6th "small accident" seem unlikely? I'm on the side that is hoping you did (like everyone else here, I believe).
Bill
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On 8/21/2013 4:49 PM, ts wrote:

Contractor saw are famous for getting knocked out of alignment.
They can also be a stone cold bitch to get back in alignment.
Are you familiar with the process of setting up the alignment ?
Here is a thread on the subject:
http://forums.finewoodworking.com/fine-woodworking-knots/power-tools-and-machinery/adjusting-delta-contractor-saw
and

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9OeVk8-Y3M
which is a excellent way to learn how with Jerry Cole who is the guy who has been selling the Dooby table saw jig for years at woodworking shows.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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wrote:

Check out Dave Woolands tips at the "saw shop".
This one in particular:
http://store.thesawshop.com/catalogue/docs/tune-up.pdf
When Dave sets up a saw, it is PERFECT. He can make even a rough saw work very well (as long as it's not worn out)

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A small correction...that is a "Dubby Jig" not a "Dooby Jig".
and a suggestion for a alignment tool.
Look at this product:
http://www.ts-aligner.com/tsalignerjr.htm and his suggestions:
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An update -- I got a dial indicator. The blade is .02 out of parallel with the mitre slot back side is further out. Theortically if I adjust the fence to be almost parallel to the blade rip cuts should be ok, at least in my thinking. I only rip on the tablesaw, crosscuts are done on my sliding miter saw.
I think trying to get the blade parallel with the slot would be a real pain.
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On 8/30/2013 9:26 PM, ts wrote:

I do not quite understand what you found. You say the blade is 0.02 ??Inches?? out of parallel with the miter slot. Then you say it is further out with the ??Backside??
For discussion I define the Front the side, as the side of the blade closes to you when you look at the thin side of the blade. Back side the one furthest away from you.
If it is parallel the front side of the blade and the back side should be the same distance from the mitre slot. As I read what you have written there is a difference of 0.02??inches?? between the front and the back.
__________________________________________________________ Slot
Back of blade __________________________ front of blade
Blade
Your comment about the backside is confusing.
To do it accurately an absolutely flat disk should be attached as a blade on the arbor. In this way the set of the teeth will not confuse the measurements.
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On 8/30/2013 9:35 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Actually you can mark a blade tip measure that tip with the tip at the front or back of the table opening and then rotate the blade so that that same marked tip is in the opposite location.
Just make certain you use the same blade tooth tip.
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