Ripping oak for boards

I need to cut big oak tree on my front yard as it dangerously leans towards the house. The tree is in excellent shape. I am thinking for possible ripping the tree to boards, drying them and then using in various woodworking projects. Is it realistic and makes sense? Has anyone ever done this? What the issues can be and what I need to really accomplish that uneasy task?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There are those that are more knowledgeable but if the growth of that trunk has been at an angle, that may not be a good choice to use for much other than firewood perhaps.
The part of the trunk close to the house is under compression, with the other side in tension. When you cut it for boards, you could end up with curly Q's when that tension gets relieved and the wood starts to dry.
Bob S.

towards
done
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob S. responds:

Or, and often even more fun, weighted wood that is stickered nicely can open up like a broken zipper as it passes through the saw...or it can clamp down behind the blade. All sorts of fun with reaction wood.
Charlie Self "It is even harder for the average ape to believe that he has descended from man." H. L. Mencken
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25 Jun 2004 00:14:00 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Riving knife.
JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

trunk
I just had some logs taken off my property last fall and the loggers took leaning trees as well as straight standing trees. They were only concerned for the normal stuff like how far up the tree the branches were, etc. They didn't care about the lean. These logs all went off to become veneer, hardwood boards or furniture. Cherry often grows with a lean around here and birch does almost everywhere, and you see a lot of those woods around, so I wouldn't think the lean causes a lot of problems.
--
-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Not to mention how the turners love that reaction wood.

concerned
They
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

towards
done
You can hire someone with a portable mill to come to your house and saw the wood for you. You will then need to stack it with spacers in between each board so air can flow through it. You will need to place weight on top of it as well and keep it dry. It has to dry for about a year for 1" thick boards. Alternatively, you could take the boards to someone who could put them in a kiln to dry much quicker. BTW, do you know if it is a red oak or a white oak?
Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Alexander Galkin"writes:

towards
done
First, you get a tree removal company to do the job.
Your insurance company will be much happier and so will you if there is a problem.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Judging from the nature of the question I'd have to say that it does not make sense for you to take down the tree, which is leaning dangerously towards a house, and saw it into boards.and what you need is someone with the experience and equipment to do the job for you;
As for keeping and drying the boards, if you have the space to sticker and store them for a year or more while they dry, that does make sense.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Have you made your own judgment that the tree must come down, or have you consulted with a licensed *arborist* to determine the health of the tree and it's likelyhood of causing you trouble in your area(frequency of bad storms, etc.). I have a near 95 yr old Black or Silver Maple that leans over my back deck and some limbs towards the house and I'd never think of removing it unless my arborist said it was necessary. In fact, when I put on an addition, we "Root pruned" the tree just to protect it since the basement came near and it's been fine...so far, 6 years later.
I chose to rely on the expert with the experience rather than my own flight of paranoia or worry.
--
Regards,
JP
"The measure of a man is what he will do
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Your house, your family at risk, your insurance company, your premiums, and you let someone else make the decisions?
You were already committed to keeping the tree, I should say, and found confirmation. Had the *arborist* detected a different lean in _you_ , he might have come up with another decision.
Lot of former tree-lovers who built hereabouts have done a bit of clearing after they experienced the problems that bare dirt under dense foliage can cause with carpeting, and shade with mosquitoes, to name a few. I keep a mile of paths brushed and mowed for when I want a walk in the woods. At home I like sunlight, safety, and no taste of bug dope when dining alfresco.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, I consulted several tree experts and they share the same opinion: tree is dangerously leaning towards the house. I would do everything possible to preserve the tree, as it is very beautiful and provides important shade over the house, but I wouldn't risk my family and house. No one knows when a disaster may strike, the tree is over hundred years old for sure. Just two weeks ago a branch from other huge oak fell across the street. The branch and the tree was in excellent condition, no rot whatsoever. Last year I also had another huge oak fell on neighboring playhouse parking lot. The tree itself was also in excellent condition but the very base was completely eaten out by unidentified bugs that caused tree to fall. That tree I was able to cut and plat myself for firewood. now I have another firewood for two lives. Since I am probably going to remove that oak on front yard I would be more then happy to use the wood for my woodworking projects, at least it would then pay for itself for removing the tree.
wrote:

towards
done
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't even think about felling it yourself. If it's close enough to cause a problem, it's a hard enough fell that you need someone experienced, and with adequate insurance.
I don't know how much "lean" is, but typical oaks in my neighbourhood are substantial enough that a leaning trunk is stil usable for timber. Branches are usable too, but they have to be treated as reaction wood. There's a good trade in "knees", ready-curved timbers for specialist jobs such as boatbuilding and timber framing. Find matching pairs of big "cruck" timbers and you're talking good money.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.