Ripping narrow pieces from wide stock

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Chris Friesen wrote:

I just upgraded from a $30 Skill saw to an Hitachi C7BD2 as the Skill would flex left to right leaving saw marks in my cuts (and burning on occassion) and it's made a big difference, with a nice sharp plywood blade I can get glassy cuts with no tearout. I think if I had a better infeed/outfeed setup and a splitter I'd be more comfortable with doing the cuts on the tablesaw. My two incidents both happened before I fashioned a splitter for the saw but the straight edge works well enough for me not to look for an alternative at the moment.
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wrote:

You can put a hardboard foot on the circular saw as well, and then plunge the blade through it to make a zero-clearance insert for it. Reduces splintering immensely. If you just plunge it, you lose your blade guard, with is a bad idea, but you can cut a wider groove on the back side to let the guard through- as long as the hardboard is close to the blade in the front, it'll do the job. And as an added bonus, the hardboard foot is a lot nicer to your stock than the average circular saw foot.
That being said, it seems a little odd to use a circular saw for something like ripping a bunch of 2" strips when the table saw is right there.
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On 21 Jun 2006 06:49:59 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@nc.rr.com wrote:

One thing to do is make sure your saw is accurately setup. Following the manual on my Ridgid 3650, I lined everything up accurately using a T-square. Blade was 90 degrees and lined up accurately with the t-slot for miter gauge. But when I was using saw, sometime felt a tendancy for wood to pinch right at end. Solution: I went to Harbor Freight and got their caliber device (thingy abob...what every you call it... http://tinyurl.com/ro86g ), made a wooden holder and bolted it to it to run along miter slot. Found out my saw was slightly off. Worked and got it lined up correctly now. No more tendancy to pinch and kickback. Another thing to do is put the guage onto other miter trac against fence and make sure fence is perfectly parallel to the track as well.
- Clayton
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haven't read all yet, however. when pushing forward through fence, when narrow & wide piece are about to seperate when they fully pass the blade, make sure you are pushing only on the side that has support - the fence side. Otherwise, if you're pushing on the left, or both, when the wood separates, by pushing forward, you will be pushing the cut waste side directly into the back of the blade.
A cross cut sled is something everyone has to make, can't buy 'em. Easy, and can buy and construct for penauts, w/ no tools, in minutes. The cuts are perfect. Clamp on a stop and without a caliper you would never find any difference on any corner.
Some rules are easy to remember. Never use the fence and the mitre at the same time. Others, like this, through trial and error. Actually, there should be a table. Think each cut through first.
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