Ripping narrow pieces from wide stock

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When I first experienced some bias with the single roller stand I bought, I looked at a bias free roller stand on Lee Valley Tools' website. I then went out and bought some cheap wheeled casters, screwed them down to a piece of 2x4 and mounted that onto the roller stand. It's a little top heavy, but it works fine without any bias whatsoever.
I have considered the ball bearing type, but I do have a question about them. I saw mention once that the relatively small surface contact they use can cause indentations in stuff like veneered plywood. Have you ever experience anything like this?
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"Upscale" wrote in message

use
Never noticed that being a problem, but now that my shop if full to the max, I seldom use them for lack of room and solved the need in other ways.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
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I'm sure it could, if you hammer on it while it's on the stand. Not even balsa is soft enough to dent of it's own weight just rolling across a stand.

use
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stand.
Actually, you're completely wrong. The density of plywood is many times that of balsa wood and correspondingly heavier. And you're also wrong about the possibility of denting. I was curious about what I heard so this evening so I went over to a friend's house to test it out. Many veneers over plywood are quite a bit softer than the plywood core itself. Using an oak veneer over plywood and a 4'x8'x3/5" sheet with roller ball spacing of more than 12" (I removed two rows of rollers as a test), it does leave a mark on the veneer.
Got any more uninformed smart ass comments?
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Sitting on it while it goes over the rollers doesn't qualify. You're full of it.

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of
You really are an asshole aren't you? As to lying, I don't lie and I don't cheat. So far, John Clark is the only liar I've seen here.
Perhaps I should post some pictures. But then, you'd say that I purposefully caused the effect wouldn't you?
Quite the shallow little world you live in.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com says...

I have roller stands but I've had problems from time-to-time using them on the outfeed side as the board or panel would hit the roller top and push the roller over rather than go over the top and be supported. I do, however, use them for infeed support on big panels.
I know this is not a solution for everyone, but I recently installed one of the HTC outfeed roller units on my PM66. Man, do I ever love it!
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I have been using the Jet, HTC built version of the out feed roller setup for about 6 years. It works perfectly and has never had to be realigned. I especially appreciate the fact that it is totally supported by the saw. Moving the saw for different sized material cuts is like moving a saw with out an out feed setup.
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Two gadgets that help when ripping:1) ripstrate: A roller device that sits on the rip fence. It holds the wood down and the angle of the wheels drives the wood "into" the fence. Wheels only turn i one direction to prevent launches. A heavy duty and well made device. 2) At the opposit eend of the spectrum is a simple plastic tab, that mounts inline with the saw blade in a zero clearance insert. It works like a splitter, but the plastic springyness keeps the woo pushed up against the fence.
Mitch
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They're called Board Buddies. http://www.grizzly.com/products/G2370

Sounds like you're talking about a Microjig Splitter. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pQ151&cat=1,41080,41165
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I'll give that a qualified endorsement- you're only likely to get into trouble with sheet goods if they're way too big for you to handle (in that cased, get a helper) or if you try to rip without using your fence. With the fence in place and the work held snug against it, there's little or no risk.
The only thing I've got to add is that the suggestion in another post that you set the fence at a distance further than your 2" and use a block is a bad idea. That works really well if you are using the miter gauge and want to use the fence as a stop block to make a lot of crosscuts that are the same length, but with sheet goods, it's just more likely to make the peice twist on the saw, and then you *will* have problems.
Use a push stick for the end of the cut. This is a meat-and-potatoes use for a table saw- use caution, certainly; but if you don't feel fairly comfortable with this operation pretty quickly, woodworking may not be for you- everything else you can do with a tablesaw is far more difficult than what you're describing.
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On Wed, 21 Jun 2006 14:43:09 GMT, "Leon"

I would just add if the saw doesn't have a large table you may find it easier to rip off a piece that is large enough to cut all 4 pieces from first. In other words take 4 x 2" plus 3 saw kerfs 3 x 1/8" plus a little bit to be safe, so say 8.5". This makes the first cut a bit more balanced and at a width that you don't need a push stick for. Then when you are using the push stick you don't have so much weight to deal with.
-Leuf
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Leuf wrote:

I agree with Leuf but would go a little wider, say 9" until you get a little more practice.
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snipped-for-privacy@nc.rr.com wrote:

Leon gave you the straight dope. In addition to what he said, there is nothing that prevents you from initially ripping the wide piece into narrower ones - 12", 18", 24"...whatever - then ripping the 2" pieces from those more manageable sizes. In your case, you want 4-2" strips which = 8" plus the kerfs.
--

dadiOH
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snipped-for-privacy@nc.rr.com wrote: > I just purchased my first table saw this weekend and I'm trying to get > a better handle on how to most effectively (and safely) use it. I need > to rip some 2" wide pieces of 3/4" plywood and I'm trying to figure out > the best way to do it where I don't end up wasting a bunch of wood. > Say the plywood is 4' x 4' and I want to cut (4) 2" x 4' strips from > it. It would seem the most accurate way to do this would be to set the > rip fence (which is to the right of the blade) 2" from the blade and > then run the board with the majority of the board to the left of the > blade.
<snip>
As UPSCALE has suggested, cut this project down to size first.
Rip a piece about 10" wide first, then rip the 2" pieces from the 10" piece.
If you don't have infeed and outfeed tables to support the piece, get some help. I would NOT try to handle a 4x4 sheet with only a table saw top to support the piece.
If you have a circular saw and a straight edge, time to use it first as UPSCALE suggests.
Lew
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I don't disagree with any of the several 'answers' I've read.
HOWEVER, while they 'hint' at something critically important - they don't address it DIRECTLY. It is something you should have done BEFORE you bought the saw. {The 'operation' you want to perform is a very basic one}. Do a bit of research in view of WHAT YOU want to do and expect the saw to do. It doesn't even have to cost anything. Obviously, you can still do it now, but you will have to live with what you got . . . at least for a little while !! {like I did - many years ago}
Go to your local LIBRARY. Look for the woodworking section and books specific to tablesaws. A number of them will probably be old - but the very basics don't change. Skim through these books. More importantly, look for recently published books - some may even illustrate your saw !! Check these out and study them.
For specific 'Tips & Tricks' most libraries have copy machines {cheaper then the local 7-11}. It's worth a couple of dollars to put these in a 'shop notebook'.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

SNIP
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First off, if you are new to using the tablesaw, I strongly recommend either reading a good book on using it (I really like Kelly Mehler's book myself) or taking a class/finding someone experienced to get you started.
That said, for the example you cited, cutting 2" wide strips off a 4' long piece of plywood, I wouldn't hesitate to set the fence at 2" and rip away, using a push stick as the end of the stock approacheds the blade. Now, if you were cutting such that you were getting 2" X 2' long strips, i.e. the stock with the 2 ft edge parallel to the blade, then you would likely experience the trouble you mention in your post. It would be difficult to keep the stock propery aligned using only a miter gauge. A sled or panel-cutting jig, both described in Mehler's and most other tablesaw books, would be appropriate. An extension fence on the miter gauge would also help, but not as much as a sled. OTOH, if you were cutting 1/4" plywood, as opposed to 3/4", it would probably be light enough that you could maintain enoug control using only a miter gauge with fence extension.
Again, I really recommend one of the many good books on using the tablesaw. They will help you work efficiently and safely and explain how to do many jobs on the TS that do not have obvious methods.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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snipped-for-privacy@nc.rr.com wrote:

As a newbie I went down this path and I heartily recommend not cutting sheetgoods on the table saw. Clamp a straightedge to the goods and use a good circular saw instead. I realise that you can cut sheetgoods with a tablesaw and many here do it regularly with no issues but it's not one of the simpler operations for a newbie to do safely.
Do an Amazon search for TruGrip, I have the 4ft, and 8ft guides and the sawbase and by using these I can do very accurate, safe cuts on sheetgoods. Good luck :)
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Here's an example of an edge guide that's the same as the Trugrip that Damian mentioned. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p0035&cat=1,240,45313
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damian penney wrote:

I do this, and get decent results. However, unless you have a decent circular saw and blade, the results aren't as good as the table saw.
I recently upgraded to a cabinet saw, and cutting plywood gives me much smoother edges than the circular saw.
Maybe it just means I need a new circular saw and blade...
Chris
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