Ripping miter cuts

Using a left tilt saw, when ripping long miter cuts ( 36" ) do you use the fence on the left of the blade or the right and why?
I find that when I use the fence on the right I have a hard time keeping the stock against the fence, even with hold downs and push sticks it seems that the stock wants to ride up the tilted blade.
I have not tried it with the fence on the left - for some reason it just doesn't look safe to me and I like my fingers.
Considering getting a good large chamfer bit that will do a 45 miter on 4/4 stock.
Any thoughts on that?
Vic
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The thought you have regarding "not looking safe" should be heeded. You might check fence alignment for the ride up thing that's happening, and use a featherboard? Tom
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I agree with Tom, check your alignment especially if you have a contractor saw. They are notorious for the blade shifting out of parallel when beveled.
Don't go on the left, if the piece starts to lif it will get wedged and could become a projectile. My saw tilts right so I DO cut with the fence on the left when beveling.
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wrote:

That's why I felt uncomfortable - it looked like an accident waiting to happen. I have always followed the rule that if I feel uncomfortable about a specific cut, I just don't do it. There's always another way.
The saw is an old ( circa 1960 ) craftsman contractor saw, back when they made them out of real metal not sheet goods. I'd forgotten about rechecking for parallel after tilting the blade. I know it's fine when vertical but it's so rare that I have to tilt the blade for a cut that I haven't checked it in a while.
Any thoughts on using a chamfer bit for the same task?
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<Snip beveled ripping on TS discussion>

make a few passes. You will also need a router table and fence or an edge guide to use a hand-held router since the bearing will have nowhere to ride if you want to 45 the entire edge.
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Vic Baron wrote:
> Using a left tilt saw, when ripping long miter cuts ( 36" ) do you use the > fence on the left of the blade or the right and why? > > I find that when I use the fence on the right I have a hard time keeping the > stock against the fence, even with hold downs and push sticks it seems that > the stock wants to ride up the tilted blade. <snip>
Have you tried using a feather board locked in a miter gage slot to keep the stock against the fence?
This is in addition to a hold down.
Another suggestion would be to use the "Board Buddy" product (Tapered plastic spring loaded rollers).
Lew
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Used the feather board in miter slot and an overhead guard. Board buddy is an interesting thought.
Vic
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Assuming you are really talking about cutting bevel cuts rather than miter cuts, your safer bet is to have the fence on the right side of the left tilt blade when the blade is tilted.
If the wood climbs up on the blade but is not trapped it has little chance of coming back at you with any force. Your real concern as you have mentioned is when a piece of wood becomes trapped between the blade and a stationary surface.
If the wood is not perfectly flat or straight making a bevel cut is more difficult. A feather board even with, but not past the very front of the cutting edge of the blade will help, but never put the feather board farther back than the front of the blade where it comes up from the table surface. Farther back increases the chance of a kick back.
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Use a longer, shoe-type push _board_ that sits on top of the workpiece instead of a stick that just holds down the trailing end. Run a piece of friction tape along the bottom to prevent sideways slipping.
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wrote:

Now that makes sense - DUH!
Thanx!
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