"Ripping" baseboard on a router table?

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Your only "mistake" in this whole deal was in your wording .. .. if you had said "I need to remove 1/4" of material .. is jointing on a router table, using split fences a good option ??", I thin you would have gotten more favorable responses. As soon as you called it a "ripping" operation, folks got all weird on you.
Use your router table with the offset fences .. use the largest bit you can swing .. use featherboards or at least guide blocks .. use reasonable caution .. all should be well.

--------------030208020700010905000107 Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> <title></title> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#990000"> Your only "mistake" in this whole deal was in your wording .. .. if you had said "I need to remove 1/4" of material .. is jointing on a router table, using split fences a good option ??", I thin you would have gotten more favorable responses.&nbsp;&nbsp; As soon as you called it a "ripping" operation, folks got all weird on you.<br> <br> Use your router table with the offset fences .. use the largest bit you can swing .. use featherboards or at least guide blocks .. use reasonable caution .. all should be well.<br> <br> <br> &nbsp;<br> <blockquote cite="mid:4bffa16f$0$6528$ snipped-for-privacy@news.astraweb.com" type="cite"> <blockquote type="cite">I need to "rip" some 3" high baseboard down by about 1/4". This is <br> your basic home-center baseboard. <br> <br> I don't have a portable table saw, but I do have a router table with 2 <br> fences. I figure I can run the baseboard along a straight bit and <br> remove the ~1/4". <br> </blockquote> <br> </blockquote> </body> </html>
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On 5/28/10 10:38 AM, "<<<__ Bøb __>>>" wrote:

Let's say you have a 1x6 that is 5-1/2" wide and you need it to be 5-1/4, so you decide to use the table saw to do it. The thick blade's kerf is going to remove the material with no cut-off left behind.
Is that not still a rip cut?
(not arguing)
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On 5/28/2010 10:56 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

On my table saw it would indeed be a rip cut, and I would have a 1/8" strip left for the scrap bin ...
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-MIKE- wrote:

...
That's some thick TS blade (like a dado set w/ a 1/4" width)... :)
Even a standard kerf would leave sliver.
The difference imo is that a 1/4" is quite a hogging operation w/ any router leading to the possibility of splitting ahead of the cut if try it in a single pass or requiring at least two passes whereas a sawing operation does it in one. If there's only a piece or two to do, no real problem; if talking about a whole houseful of baseboard, that gets to be a sizable amount of effort...
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On 5/28/10 2:05 PM, dpb wrote:

Substitute 1/8" if it gets you past the metal block. :-)

Using a good, sharp bit and a strong router, going in the proper direction (downhill grain), shouldn't even make you think twice about taking off 1/4".
I see guys at the woodworking shows, demonstrating their panel bits, who run the entire profile at once and the cut is clean as a whistle.
I suppose if you're using a little $99 router and a 5 bucks straight bit, you'd have to sneak up on a 1/4."
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-MIKE- wrote: ...

In this case, he's no control over grain; he's got to take it off the bottom edge and run in direction of feed. Only alternative is to have two setups to feed from opposite bit sides which adds even more pita factor the operation.
Sure, it _CAN_ be done; I just don't think it's the best/easiest by far unless it's only a few pieces...
$0.02, imo, ymmv, etc., etc., etc., ...
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On 5/28/10 7:21 PM, dpb wrote:

I guess I was thinking if the grain is running up hill when sitting wall-side down, flip the trim piece end to end so it's sitting wall-side up and the grain will be running downhill.
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wrote the following:

I just did that but there was a small offcut. And that was with a full-width januwine HF chiwanese carbide blade, too! My Freud Diablo came yesterday and I'm going to install it and try it out over the weekend. It's a thin-kerf job.

Yes, it's a rip.
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On 5/28/10 2:19 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Yeah, I guess I used too big a number in my haste. But, you know what I'm saying.

Exactly. My only point was that the guy's original wording shouldn't have puzzled any of the experienced guys in here.
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On 5/28/2010 11:56 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

No more a "rip" cut than if you removed 1/4" on a jointer .. .. just semantics.
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On 5/28/10 4:18 PM, "<<<__ Bøb __>>>" wrote:

So there has to be a cut-off (waste) piece in order for it to be a rip?
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Did I ever say that ?? ?? ?? I don't think so !! !! !!
From WIKIPEDIA : In woodworking <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodworking>, a *rip cut* is a cut made parallel to the wood grain <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood_grain>. Rip cuts are commonly made with a table saw <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_saw>, but other types of saws can also be used, including hand <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hand_saw> rip saws <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rip_saw>, radial arm saws <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radial_arm_saw> and band saws <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Band_saw>.
Kinda implies that we're talking about types of saws when referring to a rip cut .. not routers or jointers. In other words .. you can certainly NARROW a board using a jointer or router .. but it doesn't meet the criteria for calling it a "rip". I mean .. if someone gave you a piece of lumber and asked you to rip it in half .. would you head to the router table or the table saw ?? I don't think a rip operation mandates a piece of waste .. I think a rip operation implies it will be done with some type of saw as stated in the WIKI definition. Heck .. I don't care if you get a trained beaver to chew it off .. it will result in a narrower piece of stock, but it wouldn't have been ripped to get there.
--------------000004010306080608000703 Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#990000"> <br> <blockquote cite="mid:htpcc6$uff$ snipped-for-privacy@news.eternal-september.org" type="cite"> <blockquote type="cite">No more a "rip" cut than if you removed 1/4" on a jointer .. .. just <br> semantics. <br> </blockquote> <br> So there has to be a cut-off (waste) piece in order for it to be a rip? <br> <br> <br> </blockquote> Did I ever say that ?? ?? ??&nbsp;&nbsp; I don't think so !! !! !!<br> <br> From WIKIPEDIA : In <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodworking" title="Woodworking">woodworking</a>, a <b>rip cut</b> is a cut made parallel to the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood_grain" title="Wood grain">wood grain</a>. Rip cuts are commonly made with a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_saw" title="Table saw">table saw</a>, but other types of saws can also be used, including <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hand_saw" title="Hand saw">hand</a> <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rip_saw" title="Rip saw">rip saws</a>,
<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radial_arm_saw" title="Radial arm saw">radial arm saws</a> and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Band_saw" title="Band saw" class="mw-redirect">band saws</a>.<br> <br> Kinda implies that we're talking about types of saws when referring to a rip cut .. not routers or jointers.&nbsp;&nbsp; In other words .. you can certainly NARROW a board using a jointer or router .. but it doesn't meet the criteria for calling it a "rip".&nbsp;&nbsp; I mean .. if someone gave you a piece of lumber and asked you to rip it in half .. would you head to the router table or the table saw ??&nbsp;&nbsp; I don't think a rip operation mandates a piece of waste .. I think a rip operation implies it will be done with some type of saw as stated in the WIKI definition.&nbsp;&nbsp; Heck .. I don't care if you get a trained beaver to chew it off .. it will result in a narrower piece of stock, but it wouldn't have been ripped to get there.<br> <br> <br> </body> </html>
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On 5/28/10 4:51 PM, "<<<__ Bøb __>>>" wrote:

I know that... and apparently you know that....and any experienced woodworker knows that. But you gave the guy a hard time for using the wrong words.... when we all knew what he was talking about from his description.
So I would think the only confusion would be from inexperienced woodworkers, whose advice one probably wouldn't want. Nor from people who would get "weird" on someone asking for advice but not use the exact terminology you prefer.
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Man, have you ever misinterpreted what I wrote !! !! !!
I wasn't giving the OP a hard time at all .. .. I was kinda being apologetic for all the silly controversy he got as responses. I mean .. kickbacks & finger-removing problems .. gimme' a break already.
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On 5/28/10 5:47 PM, "<<<__ Bøb __>>>" wrote:

Relax, man. I said in the first post I wasn't arguing. Sorry if it's coming across that way. I'm not the one using exclamation points. :-p
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re: "I wasn't giving the OP a hard time at all"
BTW...I took it like you meant it. We're good! :-)
You'll also noticed I put the words "rip" in quotes cuz I knew it wasn't really a "rip".
Of all the tools I have, a jointer is not amongst the group, so asking about using a router as a jointer wasn't something that came to mind.
Anyway, as I was loading up the tools to come to Dad's house, I remembered that I still have my old Hirsch Saw Table from 20(?) years ago buried in the back of the shed. Long ago I put a piece of plywood on top and have used it as a portable work bench on occasion.
I threw it in the van, but I'm not sure if the mounting plate is intact or if my PC left-hand circular saw will mount to it. I was going to clamp the router table to it, but maybe I'll take the plywood off and see if I can make it work as a table saw.
PS It's only about 15 feet worth.
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Equal Time Post: 15 feet is easily within hand tool range! Working to a line, a rip saw, bench plane, draw knife, or even a spoke shave would take care of that!
JAG ;~)
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On Sat, 29 May 2010 08:28:31 -0400, "John Grossbohlin"

Setting up a plane for use as a/on a shooting board, _and_ performing the work, wouldn't have taken as long to set up than his posting has so far. ;)
http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan7.htm #51-52
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Bookmarked!
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On 05/29/2010 11:22 PM, Steve wrote:

Absolutely. It's one of the longest-lived bookmarks in my browser, and I still refer to it all the time. Patrick really should turn this site into a bona-fide book.
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