Ripping 1x4 to 1x3

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I need to rip about 10 1x4 (10 ft long) to 1x3. I have a mitre saw and circular saw/skil saw but no table saw. I don't have the space or much future anticipated use for table saw so did not want to invest in one.
I was planning to clamp on one of the 1x4s as a guide and use my circular saw to do the ripping. Will this work and end product be acceptable to use as trim on outside of a playhouse? Or is the cut going to be so crooked as to look ugly?
Any other suggestions on how I can accomplish this job with tools at hand?
Thanks
AK
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I've done that many time on panels too large for my table saw. It has always been fine for a non-critical application; which I presume a playhouse is.
I guess you don't have a jointer, but a pass through one would make better.
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"A" pass? That's one hell of a pass, turning a 1x4 into a 1x3. Sixteen passes, maybe...
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forgive me but I can not resist the temptation...NO SHIT SHERLOCK!!! I am sure that he meant using the jointer after he ripped the pieces with the hand saw!
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I'd go with the rip guide that fits your circular saw. A very handy accessory.
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You got it. Circular saw should be fine and as good as a table saw doing it this way. If your CS comes with the "T-square" edge guide you could use that too. Good side down.
Or is the cut

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Fred wrote:

If you don't have the t- square thing you can screw or clamp a 1x2 a foot or two long to the plateen of your saw, parallel to the blade, and use that as an edge guide. The longer it is the more it will even out the bumps and hollows of the edge the guide rides against. Sam
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You could also turn your circle saw into a table saw in about 10 minutes. Drill some holes in the plateen. Plunge cut the saw through a piece of plywood. Unplug the saw. Screw the saw to the ply with 1 5/8 - 2" sheetrock screws. Wire or tape the saw trigger closed. Turn the works over and screw or clamp to some sawhorses. Break off the protruding sheetrock screws. Lay a straight edge, a 4' level works good, lightly against the sawblade and mark both ends on the plywood table, which will be 0". Measure from the marks whatever width cut you want, clamp a straight edge on the marks, a 4' level works good, plug in the saw and cut. Sam
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Sure, no problem, though you want to make sure your 1X4 guide is as straight as possible. If the CS blade is sharp, you can get a real clean cut with nothing fancier. You may have the play around figuring out how to clamp the guide to the 4" width, but it can be done.
BTW, is you're using plywood for the house, ripping a strip off the 8' length and using the machine cut edge as a straight edge guide works great. You can cut this piece into smaller needed hunks later. Just cut about 6'. stop, move the guide and cut the rest of the 10 footer.
Regards.
On 30 Aug 2005 11:57:34 -0700, ak snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 15:42:03 -0500, Tom Banes

I missed the OP, but around here we can buy 1x3s already made.
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ak snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It will work fine except you have to clamp the 1 x 4 down to something while ripping it, and the clamps will interfere with the platen on the saw. You can nail or screw the stock down instead of clamping if you don't mind the holes.

You can buy 1 x 3 furring strips, assuming that by 1 x 3 you mean 2 1/2" wide.
--

FF


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Easiest solution is find someone with a tablesaw, should be able to do this for you in about 5minutes (or less) - most neighbors would probably do this for you for a sixpack or maybe even for a pizza
John
On 30 Aug 2005 11:57:34 -0700, ak snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Get the ripgiude, or make one...you should have it anyway. Wilson

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Or use what house framers use. Their finger.
WARNING DANGEROUS USE CAUTION
Back in my framing days I remember using a finger to rip the corner moldings. Surprising accurate with practice. Right hand on the saw left hand and index finger up against the edge of the board whilst holding the saw base. Oh ya on a worm drive to boot. :)
Funny how you see no miter boxes, table saws or levels in a framers truck, yet they still get the job done.
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And it shows.

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"CW" wrote in message

truck,
... but it's amazing what you can do with skill and a roofing square.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/29/05
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Actually if memory serves me correctly.
Miter box - way to slow and most cuts are faster and just as accurate with a skilled person, and a Skill-saw and a speed square.
Level - Does not belong on a job-site for a framer until the interior walls come in. Or as an old boss told me if doing a home for the owner, when the owner shows up take the level out of the truck and put it somewhere where it can be seen. The level, as I learned, is the one tool you do not want to see a framer using. Strings and measuring are more accurate.
Table-Saw. Ya it would be nice for those plywood cuts. But heck it is going to be covered up by siding or singles anyways. :)
Chris
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<...snipped...>

I'm thinking about the quality of the typical framing job here, and yeah, that would explain it...

--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Here?
I think it would be safe to say across the board. All framers = speed not quality.
Worse jobs we ever had was switching from framing to finish work. Something that would actually be seen.
I am now in a 2400sqft manufactured home. You could never tell from the outside. Almost 20 years old now. Not a squeak in the floor, crack in the drywall, everything plumb and level, and I could go on. Thing is as tight as a drum to boot. I use no heat upstairs (this is New England). In the summer I have a house fan running on hot days. With the fan running it is hard as heck to get the outside doors closed.
Comparing that to the 3000sqft super home done the street is a joke. 8 years newer with more squeaks and cracks. His heating bill is 6 times mine (I do burn wood though). He also has a hutch that is flush with the baseboard and leans 2" away from the wall at the top.
Factory homes have my approval. I have heard now that a factory home can fetch up to 7% more at appraisal time.
Chris
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Not around here. They classify them as mobile homes, same as a trailer. Factory built, on site assembled houses are inherently superior quality but the builders around here have lobbied hard to have them classified as second rate.

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