Ridgid TS modification Question

I have a Ridgid TS 2424 in my shop. This year for Christmas SWMBO is getting me a 40" Biesemey fence and side table for it (meep meep). In addition I am giving my dad the current side table that I have in return for one of his side wings from a newer TS3650. the 3650 wing is solid cast iron as opposed to open cast iron. The one other difference is that the 3650 wing has a beveled front edge. My saw however does not have the bevel. I am wondering if there is a way that I can add the bevel to the front edge of the saw? I was thinking that I could rough the bevel with a hand grinder and files and then sand it smooth with a die grinder. Does anyone know if this will work, or if there is another way? Or is this just a bad idea that could lead to a messed up saw. Any advice or suggestions would be appreciated.
--
-Rob Ritch
snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcast.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob Ritch wrote:

I wouldn't bother. On most table saws that I have seen, the bevel doesn't match on the wings and the table anyway. If you have been getting by without the bevel, why do you need it now? Do you ever start the workpiece from in front of the table?
If you really want to bevel it, you might want to have it machined for you.
My two cents, (.0245763 CAD)
Eric T
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't really know whether the bevel is necessary or not. I've got a bevel on my JET contractors saw, and a slightly different bevel on the some-other-brand added-on-later wing. I've never noticed sleds or the miter gauge hanging up on the edge, but then I don't remember any hanging up on my old saw that AFAIR didn't have a bevel. But it should be easy to do. I saw on somebody's web page the following technique: Scribe a line on the unbevelled table top and another line on the table front that match the bevel on the wing. Grind most of the material off with an angle grinder. Sneak up on the scribed line by drawfiling, and smooth (if necessary) with fine paper on a block. Lewis
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My first inclination Rob would be to suggest you stay away from the grinder/die grinder approach unless you're really, really good with those tools. They really aren't tools designed to cut like that and most folks would not find it easy to keep a decent line doing what you're describing. Maybe you're capable of it so I can't say just don't do it, but I'm not sure I'd try it this way. I guess I'm not sure I understand why you need the bevel in the first place. But... if you feel you need it and you're committed to using the grinder, then I'd mark a line and stay a bit shy of it with the grinder and then bring it home with a belt sander.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 02:50:01 GMT, "Mike Marlow"

for sure... side grinders and die grinders are not what I'd consider "precision" tools..
If it was me, I'd as a local machine shop.. probably charge 10 or 20 bucks to do it in their off time, with precision equipment.. YMMV
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

But it looks so easy on "Monster Garage". <G>
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Using a grinder is a good idea. Just make sure that you always move it along in a long stroke. That would reduce uneven grinding a bit. Die grinder, um, could chatter a bit.
In granite countertop fabrication, they use a diamond disk on a grinder to make the bevel. They then use sandpaper on the a grinder's disk for polishing.
I have a 6-8 flutes countersink bit from HD that would seems to cut metal well. Use it in a router to clean up the bevel?
Rob Ritch wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.