Review, Harbor Freight Oscillating Multifunction Tool

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snipped-for-privacy@mikedrumsDOT.com says...

Perhaps he has the multifunction tools conflated with something else. I notice that a _lot_ of people think that they are some variant of an angle grinder.
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Nice example of a use for the tool. I wonder how many Fein owners would feel comfortable taking their $300+ tool up a ladder to do the same?
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Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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If it interests you, some people sharpen their blades. Apparently, a sanding/cutoff wheel in a Dremel can be used to cut new teeth in the multifunction tool blade. I've never heard of a set being put on the teeth and doubt it's necessary as long as your blades aren't getting stuck. Just ensure that new teeth are clean and flat.
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Add your comment to the HF review website. http://hfreviews.com/ I do not believe the site is owned by HF.
Mike in Ohio
On 11/07/2010 11:17 AM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

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Ivan Vegvary wrote:

I had almost the exact same project except my holes for soffit vents were 8 inches by four feet. I tried several of the same tools you did.
What finally worked best for me was a branch-trimming chain saw!
Oh the edges of the resulting hole were not, er, "neat," but they were being covered by a home-made screen, so the irregularities did not show.
And, as another responder said, you CAN "sharpen" a worn-out blade by using a rotary Dremel to cut as many 1/8" slots in the blade as you can muster.
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On 11/7/2010 10:17 AM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

for a door latch. The new one was larger than the old one and I had to enlarge the mortise to set it in, and the hole behind the catch hole. The MF worked great, a few seconds each cut and there it was.
Bill
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Snip
QUESTION: The teeth on the cutter don't have any 'set'. Would this work better with 'set' teeth? Is 'set' simply to allow saw dust to get out of the way? Of course, having no 'set' is probably the reason that the tool does not 'grab' and cut into the template as you slide it along.
Ivan Vegvary
Very doubtful if it blade would work better with set in the teeth. Teeth are often set to create a wider kerf so that the work does not pinch the back side of the blade.
Because the tooth travel is greatly limited you need to still use the tool as if using a hand saw to clear the dust out of the teeth. Fein instructed me to work the tool back and forth as if slicing a loaf of bread. FWIW there are blades that do have a set and that do work with these type tools, I have found that they do not perform better as a rule and leave a jagged cut.
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Considered skill saw, saber saw, roto-zip and oscillating tool.

I used my router for this job - I guess akin to your roto-zip. I tacked the template to the wood and routed out the opening nicely, clean and with little difficulty (well, I was working upside down on a ladder with a fear of heights).
I was only adding extra ventilation so only did ten or so openings.
Did you use the cheap model or the more expensive variable speed unit?
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