Reswaing on TS is possible

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Don't yet have a bandsaw but I do have a nice piece of 3/4" Maple that I wanted to split so I tried it on the TS. I have a Jet contractor saw with a Freud Diablo 50T combination blade. I had taken the time to align everything and have minimal runout so I decided to try it on the TS.
I cut the 1x6 to 20" long and set the blade height just under half the width of the board. Then I installed the auxiliary fence that is 5" high and grabbed a push stick. Thought about running a test board of Pine or Poplar first but decided not to since they are not even close to Maple's hardness. Started running the board through and it went surprisingly easy. Flipped it end for end to keep the same side against the fence and made the second cut. No problems.
My original plan was to finish up the sliver left in the middle with a handsaw but all I have is an aggressive tooth saw that was biting too hard. So I stood the board up and took a chisel to the end and it split right in half. The results were of course not as good as you would get with a bandsaw because of the 1/8" kerf but still looked great.
If you want to try this yourself: Make sure your saw is aligned properly - parallel and at 90deg Have a sharp, clean blade installed Use a push stick -
http://www.woodzone.com/images/tips/rectpushstick.jpg
"...The most important safety tool of all, safety glasses" Use high fence Stand to the side in case of kickback
Be safe!
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Actually you can easily cut all the way through a 1x6 in 2 passes with out having to split the pieces. For several years I was resawing 1x6 Ipe, Ipe is 2.5 times harder than Oak. At first I did the 2 shallower passes and finished up with a recip saw but after resawing literally 100's of linear feet of 1x6 Ipe I found that this could be done easier by going deep enough to complete the cut on the second pass. Nothing exciting happens as long as you are careful and take proper precautions.
I do advise using a splitter and feather boards on the front side of the cut.
As with any sawing operation, don't do what you are not confident in doing.

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Leon said:

And be careful, especially when you are.
Greg G.
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"Greg G." wrote

doing.
Well said on both counts ...
False confidence, such as that brought about by actions like "repetitive" tasks, has a tendency to bite you sooner or later.
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Swingman said:

Exactly. In the segmented stuff I make (for some unknown reason), a piece can include hundreds of pieces - with twice as many runs through the saw blade. After a while, and especially with a jig and sled, it gets pretty monotonous and your attention can meander. I have included all the usual lumps and guards against casual contact with the blade on the jig, but you still have to keep your wits about you when dealing with a 50 tooth, carbide tipped, 3200 RPM meat cutter.
And another thing, when something in the back of your mind says "that's stupid", pay attention to that voice. The last "event" I had was crosscutting a piece in a crosscut sled. I a hurry, I had marked the edge of one side of the board with a mark, put the piece in the sled with the mark towards the blade. There was a slight (1/16") concave dip in the edge against the sled fence and I said to myself, "That's going to pinch the blade" - right before I shoved it through. It did, and although it wasn't too dramatic, it did make the sled jump back and scare the hell out of me at the same time. DOH!
Greg G.
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Great information folks. I find the resawing process one of the most scary on a table saw, so I pay a lot of attention. It is handy to have a knee switch on your table saw so you can hit it if your hands are tied up controlling the wood. I had to "knee" off my saw recently when resawing a large piece. I am a bit of a safety nut. I wear apron, hearing protection, safety glasses and mechanics gloves.
I did make the error of working when I shouldn't have and paid for it. I was recovering from cancer surgery and going nuts. I decided to work on a project in my shop. I did not realize how little stamina I had. The result was a dizzy spell and two finger in the table saw blade! Fortunately I did not lose either, but it was a painful experiance and one I don't plan to repeat. Dave G.
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I'm with you on the safety but rarely wear gloves when working with power tools. My thinking is I'd rather take the cuts & scrapes then chance my whole hand being pulled in by the fabric or leather.
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I'm with you on the safety but rarely wear gloves when working with power tools. My thinking is I'd rather take the cuts & scrapes then chance my whole hand being pulled in by the fabric or leather.
FIY, fabric/leather gloves are typically not ever in a danger of being pulled in. That is a popular misunderstanding. Those type gloves can however get caught and pulled in on machines that do not have sharp cutting edges when running such as the lathe and or a drill bit on a drill press. For machines like the table saw the blade will simply cut through the material and that will be that providing the incident does not scare you and you jerk or flinch your hand into the blade.
The fabric is much softer and easier to cut than wood therefore it simply cuts much like wood. This was discussed several years ago and to prove this point I took a canvas/leather glove and deliberately pushed it into the spinning blade on my TS. The blade simply cut through the leather/canvas and left a clean 1/8" wide kerf. The glove sat still with the blade spinning in the kerf after I stopped pushing.
I say this simply to point out that the glove will be cut and not be pulled in. I agree with you however that the glove should not be worn as it may introduce other problems such as the blade touching a part of the glove and causing you to flinch. Additionally if you become accustomed to wearing gloves around jointers, table saws and other machinery with sharp spinning blades you may use the glove at the drill press and or lathe and that would be an instance where the fabric would pull you in as it is not being cut but simply being wrapped around an object that is not cutting.
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I wear gloves when operationg most of my power tools, except my drill press. I wear them to protect my hands from minor cuts and splinters. In addition they help reduce the vibration from sanders and provide a bitter grip. I am a bit of a safety nut so I do pay attention to when I should and should not be wearing them. Personally, I would rather have them and take them off then not have them.
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Snip
.
I wear gloves when operationg most of my power tools, except my drill press. I wear them to protect my hands from minor cuts and splinters. In addition they help reduce the vibration from sanders and provide a bitter grip. I am a bit of a safety nut so I do pay attention to when I should and should not be wearing them. Personally, I would rather have them and take them off then not have them.
The key is to remember to take them off when you should, never letting the inconvenience of doing so stop you from doing so, never forgetting, never saying to yourself that you won't to this one time, never forgetting to do so if in doubt, and remembering all of this every single time for the rest of your life when working with power tools.
I have forgotten things in the past and will probably will again, I don't wear gloves.
BTY, in 1989 after being a serious wood worker for 10+ years I thought I was a safety nut and practiced safe procedures until I cut half of my thumb off after turning the table saw OFF and was no longer cutting wood. Some times the tool will get you when you are not actually using it to cut wood.
IMHO NO ONE knows all the safety procedures that should be taken but should practice all of those that he or she does know. You simply cannot be careful enough as we are only human, we make mistakes. Recognizing that fact will go a long way to "help" prevent an accident.
NEVER let your guard down.
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"Leon" wrote

times
Boy Howdy, that fer damn sure, cher!
You've seen the scar from the 13 stitches on my almost "decapitated", nicely "filleted" right thumb ... and there wasn't even a blade in the damn table saw when it happened!
And it was still listed as a "Table Saw" accident for statistical purposes at the ER.
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I guess we just have to be older to realize that we ain't invincible and ANYTHING can happen.
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"Leon" wrote

Yep ... was recently, and recreationally, reading the county tax code on property tax exemptions/deferrals that might just be available to the aged, mentally deficient, sick lame and lazy, crippled and crazy, and, according to that descriptive bit of bureaucratese, I _am_ officially f%^&%ing "ELDERLY" this year.
Be careful, it could happen to you ...
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I think I may be quickly approaching aged, the grocery girl no longer wants to card me for wine. Crazy, the grocery girl laughs when I try to make her "card me" when I buy wine. Crippled, the TS own one battle.
I still think I have yet to become sick, lame, or lazy.
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"Leon" wrote

Just remember, "Canasta keeps you flit and mentally asquirt."
... or something like that. :)
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I am starting to forget how that game goes.... When is the Queen going to pay a visit?
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LOL -- I just came home from the grocery an hour or so ago with two bottles of wine. My receipt says "Age verification bypassed".
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Leon,
I have much respect for your knowledge & experience in ww as I have been reading your posts on the rec' for many years. However, I disagree with your assessment of the safety of using gloves when operation the TS. All the recommendations I have seen by the manufacturers, OSHA, and various other sources all strongly advise that gloves NOT be worn, period. I have seen your descripton of pushing the the glove into the spinning blade. Sure, it will probably just be cut by the saw tooth 99% of the time, but why take chances? How about trying your experiment with a deep-gullet rip blade, and pushing the glove sideways into the blade? Are you still so sure that it will be cut before it is pulled? I posting this because I strongly feel that gloves should simply NOT BE WORN when operating the table saw, and I don't believe in giving anyone some sort of rationalization why it is OK to use them.
--
Make it as simple as possible, but no simpler.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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Larry I apparently did not make my self totally clear. Thank you for pointing that out. I wanted to simply say that the glove will cut like wood. Past that statement all kinds of things can enter the equation that can cause an accident that may be the fault of wearing gloves. The #1 problem with gloves is probably a false sense of security. While there are 100's of ways the glove can be caught in any given operation, I would say that is still highly unlikely that the fabric would be pulled and not cut or torn by a hook/tooth traveling at over 100 mph. Additionally the chances of being pulled in would increase with my method as nothing was holding the glove to provide any resistance. A glove being held by a hand would provide more resistance and be less likely of not being cut.
Having said that I agree, why take the chance? And to RayV, please don't take my comment about the gloves as being contrary to using your head. I meant to point out that the glove is more likely to get you into trouble in other ways than being caught and pulled in by the blade.
Larry, I respect you views and thoughts and agree that gloves should not be worn when working with woodworking machinery.
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RayV said:

The only time I wear gloves is when handling fibreglass, shingles, or picking up strange women in bars.
Greg G.
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