Restoring Wooden Windows

Hello
I'm new to this forum so I hope that I have come to the right place Frankly, I don't know where else to ask.
We have a 1930s semi with original wooden bay and oriel windows wit pretty stained glass leaded lights. I am loathed to change them to uPV double glazing as most of our street has done, besides we can't affor it anyway.
I'd love to restore them but am unsure who to ask or if it's somethin I can do myself. The wood on the large bays is still pretty sound bu needs attention soon (this year). The wood on the small oriel window i rotten on the bottom part (sill?)
I haven't done anything like this before but as far as I have been abl to gather, I need to burn the paint off, apply some sort of woo hardener and then protect with coats of paint.
I am very much doubtful if I can do the work myself, but I'd like t know what needs to be done and who would be able to do the work so tha I can check that the right steps are being taken when the work i carried out.
Sorry for the long post and thanks in advance for any replies. Elis
-- Elise
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Sounds like you've got the basic idea down. I have a 1927 built bungalow with some very nice wooden double hung sash windows. We've taken just about all of them out and restored/repainted them. You'll want to take care of any rotten wood with some sort of epoxy filler and as you mentioned,a hardener.
Make sure the painter uses a good quality primer as well as a good quality exterior paint. There's a reason why paint at Home Depot and the like is cheaply priced, it's thinner than premium quality paint sold thru paint dealers. The extra cost is minimal compared to the cost of repainting again in a year or two.
You'll want the glazing compound replaced while you're at it.
John Emmons

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John Emmons wrote:

I, too have an old '30's house with double hung windows. If wood is rotten at the bottoms, you can make new bottoms, (requiring the window to be dis-asembled. Most have nails in them & not just glue) or simply cut off the rotted wood and add new - don't forget the bevel-(unless the whole bottom is rotted). If the botoms are only loose & the window is coming apart, you can drill holes in the sides or bottoms & glue in dowels.(titebondII works well for this) While you have the windows out, you may as well replace the sash ropes-- sash cord is still sold-- found some at Lowes & also Foxworth Galbrith in N Texas. Put a drop or two of oil on the sash rope bearing that is in the window casing-- WD 40 will work if you cannot get your oil can spout into the opening. Try not to spray the part where the rope rides inside the pully-- Not sure what effect the oil or WD will have on the rope. Make sure you use a good quality primer & good quality paint. also prime & paint the new window putty after a couple of days as it says on the can. I wouldn't recommend caulk, as it's the devil to remove if you ever have a piece of glass to replace.
Phil
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Well, just be very thankful that you only have to restore Wooden Windows instead of Windows XP or Windows 2000.
Mullets are ever so much easier (and nicer) to deal with than .<whatever-crap-MegaSloth-came-up-with-this-week>! At least you can caulk a minor "goof" and paint over and know that the whole danged Window System will still be up and running a year from now > :-) <
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-- it might well be the only chance you get :-)
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You just had to throw in a wise ass remark about a Microsoft operating system, didn't you. Like there ain't enough going on in another supposedly "woodworking" thread. Why do people have to pick on anybody else's O/S, whatever it is??? It works for the person using it, let it be!

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Soooorrrrry, Moooose. I do apologize to you --- but .... Well, actually No.
I threw in a "wise ass remark" about two (2) MegaSloth NON-Operating Systems. (I figure I'm entitled since I taught college courses about those abysmal things for far too many years -- from the Unix-ripoff DOS all the way through Whinnnnnnney-Dozzzzzzzze 9xxxxxxxxxx and N(o)T.)
If you can't handle the PUNishment, well, then ... shucks. I guess it's SO WHAT ??????????????? Grant me the space to make the pun or save yourself a lot of re-boot time and limp to linux (and GREP this !) -- or Move to Mac.
Now mind you, I Really AM sorry, but both of those OSs actually Work: Whinnnnnnney-Dozzzzzzzze Doesn't (work as well).
No-Doze (on the other hand) does.
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Enjoy life and *do* well by it
-- it might well be the only chance you get :-)
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Hi John,
I just wanted to say thank you for taking the time to reply. I'll tak heed and hopefully the job will get done properly. :)
Elis
-- Elise
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Elise wrote:

If the wood disintegration is not real bad (and it can look pretty bad but still have a good amount of strength) the wood hardeners for "punky" places and the two-part epoxies are a definite possibility. With moderate damage, these can be done by a moderately handy individual w/ a modicum of care and patience. The product I have used is ...oh, phoo, I can't think of the actual brand name just now...oh, here it comes -- PC Woody is the brand. They have a full line of restoration products you can find on the web or perhaps locally (at least some Ace Hardware outlets are distributors in at least small quantities).
I've used it for a several on the old barn restoration and they're holding up well after several years...
To make new pieces is also doable but will almost certainly require some help. One difficulty w/ many older windows w/ current window sash router bit combo sets is that they (the old windows) use a full length tenon rather than the stub tenon these sets are only capable of cutting--the one set I do know of is one from CMT if you want to try that route.
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This thread has made me giggle.
I only understood about 25% of it, but that's fine. It's the 25% I nee to know.
I didn't make it clear in my original post, but the windows aren't sas unfortunately.. just bog standard single glazed wooden bow bay windows.
I think I'll practice on the lean-to at the back of the house... if i goes well I'll give it a go at the front. :)
Thanks for the product rec Duane - I'll certainly have a look. Elis
-- Elise
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Also Minwax makes a system, and I've heard good things about something called "Git-Rot" though I haven't used it.
I've been doing this on some basement storms. Some of them, I had to cut off a strip on the bottom, then glue and screw a replacement on.
Read up on lead-based paint before you torch anything. I do it, but I know what risks I'm taking. If it's adhering well, just scuff it and paint over it.
Regards, Allen
--
Allen Windhorn (507) 345-2782 FAX (507) 345-2805
Kato Engineering (Though I do not speak for Kato)
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Allen Windhorn wrote: ...

I got taken on that...it's simply Bondo at 10x the price...
But, the fiberglass-free Bondo's do seem to work pretty well and are much less expensive. The major problem w/ them is there is a <very> short open time before they set up whereas the epoxies can be sculpted, etc., for a while before they get too firm...

Don't know that one...

For glue (for OP, use either the new "Type III" or a urethane waterproof glue. I'd recommend the Type III as it dries more quickly and doesn't have the foaming qualities. ...
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Perhaps before you even look to repair the windows you should do some detective work to determine the cause of the deterioration so that your repairs don't end up the same way. Most wood problems are moisture caused - either direct contact with outside moisture that does not run off properly or condensation accumulating on the inside of the pane and collecting at the bottom. Either way you really need to address this aspect of the repair in conjunction with the replacement of deteriorated materials.
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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"Sure we'll have fascism in America, but it'll come disguised
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Fly-by-Night CC wrote:

Good point to raise, but w/ a 70 year old house, it's probably just age related owing to neglect primarily over the years...but never hurts to look for problems...
BTW, Abatron is another supplier of restoration materials...more pricey than the PC Woody brand which bottom line why I went w/ it...
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