Restoring old shop equipment

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I inherited some old mostly craftsman workshop equipment, all about 55 yrs old and unused for the past 10-15. I plan on starting cleaning them up this long weekend and would like some input on the best methods. besides blowing out dust, etc, the main thing i have to do is remove rust:
work and fence surfaces have a fine covering of rust, no pitting. appears pretty minor but covers the entire area - whats the best polishing or rust removal solution and method to use? jointer blades feel sharp, but the rotor base and the blades are rusty. is there any real reason to clean them as long as they perform well?
stands and casing is all metal, cast iron i assume. there are areas of rust on these surfaces as well, but not as widespread. if i spot treat the rust i will need to repaint - is there a prefered type and brand of paint best suited for this?
a poster in a previous post about motors suggested looking for oil ports on the motor shafts, i will be looking at these as well.
thanks in advance.
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On Sep 4, 9:54 am, snipped-for-privacy@nono.com wrote:

I've had good results with WD40 and a Scotch-Brite pad to remove rust from cast iron. Wipes up easily when you are done but wear old clothes because the slurry stains are impossible to get out.
I would clean the rust on all bare metal to keep things from getting worse.
As far as the painted areas that need work I've heard rustoleum is the best but have not tried anything else.
Have fun!
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In article

Most everyone seems to be mostly concerned with the cosmetics. If the equipment is 50 plus old and has not been used in 10 to 15 I would check out the motors and arbor bearings. Just because they may turn over doesn't mean they are properly lubricated. I have seen oil turn to glue and freeze moving parts. Ideally the bearings should be taken out, cleaned, and re-lubed. Sealed bearings in an ideal world should be replaced.
Chuck P.
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i have never serviced an electric motor, is this worth paying a shop to do?
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Probably less expensive to buy a new one if it is a fractional HP.
Lew
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Now is the time to learn! If you are going to buy a new motor, why not try to refurbish the old one? You might learn something. If you have to buy a new one there is nothing lost if you were going to buy a new one in the first place.
Chuck P.
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snipped-for-privacy@nono.com wrote:

Yes! It is an easy task to carefully take a motor apart and clean the sawdust and wood chips from the area of the electrical connections. In some motors this can be done by remove a cover.
If you do take it to a shop, comparison shop. I found the small independent shops were more reasonable and less strict in their pricing structure.
At one point I thought my table saw motor had died, but when I took it to a small independent shop the guy basically blew it out and charged me a couple of dollars to take it apart and clean it. (Wood chips had gotten into the electrical contacts and would not allow them to close.)
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On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:16:01 +0000, nospamanobama wrote:

Depends on its age. The older the better :-). I've got a 1940s vintage 1hp motor that weights a ton. That thing has torque you wouldn't believe. I've been warned to never, never get rid of it.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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snipped-for-privacy@nono.com wrote:

and zerk (grease) fittings..
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On Sep 4, 8:54 am, snipped-for-privacy@nono.com wrote:

I've used T-9 Rust Free, sold by Woodcraft on cast iron and steel surfaces with a scotch brite pad. It gets rid of it in a hurry. I tried Wd-40 and it was way too much work.
Bob
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On of the magazines did a test of the rust removal/prevention products. http://www.boeshield.com/rust_prevention/stoprust.pdf
The best product for removal was actually Empire Top Saver.
It's the only one that rated "excellent" for removal. Funny that Boeshield would have the test on their site, showing how their products came in second after a competitor.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Gotta hand it to Boeshield for the impartial endorsement... Tom
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snipped-for-privacy@nono.com wrote:

I don't know if this is the acceptable method, but my Craftsman table saw is 40 years old. Over the years when it has not been used for a while it picks up a little rust. To remove the rust I have used either steel wool or extremely fine sand paper. You don't want to sand enough to cup the surface.
After I get the rust off I use auto polishing compound and then a good grade of car wax on the table.
If you have rust on the table of the saw, you may not get it completely off the first time, just get the table so that it is smooth enough so as not to catch the wood when you cut wood. The more sawdust you make the shinier the surface becomes. Sawdust makes a great polishing compound.
I have a piece of plywood that fits the top of the saw that is always on the saw when ever it is not in use. This seems to prevent rust.
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I thought car wax near woodworking was baaaaadddddd. Silicone in the car type waxes interferes with finishing products.
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On Sat, 05 Sep 2009 05:20:21 -0700, DLB wrote:

Since most folks are either sanding or planing after cutting, the dangers of silicone on saw tops is greatly exaggerated.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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DLB wrote:

I don't apply the wax on a regular basis, about once or twice per year. So there is no significant build up of wax. I have not had a problem with the wax interfering with the finishes. I have tried to keep wax in the pores in the surface but not on the surface.
HOWEVER, my principal wood working projects are picture frames where I alway keep the shinny side up, for the sake of the mitered corners.
Larry wrote: > > I have a piece of plywood that fits the top of the saw that is always on > > the saw when ever it is not in use. This seems to prevent rust
>I'd be leery of that. Depending on local humidity, moisture could get >trapped under the plywood and make the situation worse instead of >better.
I have been doing this for years, and always assumed it worked since it keeps the humid air from coming in contact with the cool surface of the table, therefore preventing condensation and any moisture build up.
HOWEVER: My shop is in an unheated attached garage where the furnace for the house is located.
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On Fri, 04 Sep 2009 15:04:39 -0400, Keith Nuttle wrote:

I'd be leery of that. Depending on local humidity, moisture could get trapped under the plywood and make the situation worse instead of better.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On Sat, 05 Sep 2009 11:26:40 -0500, Larry Blanchard

I use a beach towel (gotta get SWMBO to make a slot for the spreader). The thought being that it would protect the surface from any condensation but still let air at the surface.
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Put a post over on Old Wood Working Machines forum www.owwm.com That's were the experts on this subject lurk.
On Sep 4, 6:54 am, snipped-for-privacy@nono.com wrote:

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If your beloved sews - have them make covers - like pillow sacks that fit over - not tight - just to keep dust and moisture off.
It is amazing how well as a shop cloth keeps rust off. Not plastic - let it breath and wick as needed.
A lot of shops have dew drops at sunrise or such. Cold moist nights and then the temp rises and moisture dews out.
And the saw blades are just fine as is.
Martin
snipped-for-privacy@nono.com wrote:

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