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wrote:

Bingo.
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On Tue, 18 Oct 2011 12:38:20 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

I can't help it if you're net illiterate, as well.
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On 10/17/2011 7:52 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Well while I agree that 500% is pretty darn high, it is not unheard of of providing we are talking about GP vs net. Although profit margins are generally focused on GP and not net.
Clothing is one that comes to mind. For example a Columbia Sportswear Outlet store near me sell shirts for $11.99. I have seen the exact same brand and style shirt on their web site and at sporting goods stores for $65.00. While the $11.99 is a marked down price the store is making a profit. Guess where I buy these shirts from?
Valve stems for you vehicle tires. When I was in the tire business the stems cost me 10 cents each, sold them for $1 each.
Rockler brand accessories, sacrificial fence clamps, cost <50 cents per pair, retail >$15.
Drugs
Labor
Insurance
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Impossibly high. Profit margin is defined as NetIncome/Revenue. It's pretty hard to get that ratio above unity (100%).
http://www.investopedia.com/terms/p/profitmargin.asp#axzz1b960uVoR

Could be an overrun, sold at a loss. But it doesn't change the arithmetic.

So, what's $.90/$1?

That's 97%, excluding other costs of the sale.
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On 10/18/2011 10:06 AM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Understood from an investors point of view. Having always worked with GP and net profit with in a company and net profit margins not being a consideration for the employees the GP margin was always the one that came to mind.

Very well could be but a majority of the items in that store are at greatly reduced prices. And since we actually talking about net I am sure that this is not the norm for the company as a whole.

90%.. Sorry!!! Misread everything. I was thinking mark up percentage.
As long as there is a cost involved a GP margin above 99.9% is all but impossible.
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Many people don't understand the difference between % margin and % markup. Margin of profit on selling price vs profit mark up from cost price. Margin (ofter called points) : I buy for $3.00 and sell for $ 6.00, make 50% margin. Mark-up : I buy for $ 3.00 and sell for $ 6.00, make 100% markup. ( sell for 9 bucks, I make 200% mark up... and so on.)
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On Tue, 18 Oct 2011 11:25:01 -0500, Leon wrote:

If I buy an item for $1 and sell it for $2, that's a 100% *markup*. If I sell it for $10 that's a 1000% markup, and if I sell it for $100 that's a 10,000% markup.
Even if my overhead is fifty cents, I'm still doing quite well at a $10.00 price.
This may not be a profit percentage, but it's what most folks would consider a profit.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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That's because you just didn't like to make change. ;)
"How much for the tire?" "$25. "Here ya go." "Oh, three tens...I meant $30."
R
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On 10/18/2011 12:08 AM, m II wrote:

If he wasn't the code author, then hardly fair to blame him for being the author of whatever, is it?
You're just nuts...
--
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Try to follow the thread.
You clearly haven't followed the posts.
--------------
"dpb" wrote in message
On 10/18/2011 12:08 AM, m II wrote:

If he wasn't the code author, then hardly fair to blame him for being the author of whatever, is it?
You're just nuts...
--


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An aside, but FWIW, the '286 had a full set of protection mechanisms-- what it lacked was the ability to virtualize itself and run code written for a machine with protections disabled in a protected virtual machine. Unix System V ran fine on the 80286 with all the protections in place, but there wasn't a way to run a DOS box under Unix other than by switching the CPU to unprotected mode and back. And there was a bug in the hardware that caused problems with that switch--Novell, AT&T, and others managed to work around the bug, but somehow Digital Research never did and lost a lot of momentum as a result.
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For sheer simplicity, and elegance, the CDC 6600 was hard to beat.
Five(5!!) opcode mnemonics accounted for over _half_ the hardware instruction set. you didn't need a 'cheat sheet' (aka "green card", "yellow card", or whatever) to keep track of the instruction set. If you had any experience with any assembler language, you could learn assembler for the 6600 in a single afternoon. The *entire* language -- well enough to start writing real applications.
Now, the closer to the 'bare metal' you got, the 'stranger' the hardware got, but it _had_ it's endearing characteristics. *MUCH* to the annoyance of the pure computer-science types, and for any data set* up to the size of main memory, a carefully hand-coded one-key _bubble-sort_ would out-perform _any_ other sorting algorithm.
Oh yeah, 'self-modifying code' was an integral part of the architecture. At the _hardware_ level. You could _not_ do significant programming on the machine without using self-modifying code.
And to add to the fun "CPU HALT" was a legitimate _user_mode_ (i.e. 'unprotected') instruction. In fact, it was the 'preferred' way for a user program to exit. *great* fun. <grin>
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