Resorcinol resin adhesive?

I am having a problem in finding a local supplier in the Dallas/Ft Worth area of resorcinol resin adhesive use in making up bent laminations from thin stock. As I recall, it was once used in making aircraft propellers from laminated stock, obviously a high-tech application. One dealer said resorcinol is now "obsolete". Any comments? If it is fact obsolete, what is the current choice for high-tech/high-stress applications? He claimed polyurethane (Gorilla glue). Thanks, Dave
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"David Anderson"writes:

Absolute bull crap.
Resorcinol is alive and well.
Try an industrial lumber wholesaler.
They may not sell directly to you but should be able to point you in the right direction.
BTW, unless these are white oak laminations, you might be able to use epoxy.
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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Unibond 800? Used by folks I trust...
Patriarch
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On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 17:11:52 GMT, "David Anderson"

I don't thing I'd trust gorilla glue for a high vibration high stress critical application like propellers. GG has the disadvantage of hiding voids without strengthening them, and at it's best it doesn't seem (to my unscientifically tested gut feeling) to be anywhere as strong or to have as good adhesion.
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David Anderson wrote:

Most "high tech" applications these days don't use wood for anything but decor, so adhesives used in those applications wouldn't necessarily be particularly good for bonding of wood.
The most accessible brand is probably Weldwood Resorcinol Glue--if you froogle that you'll get several hits. I note that Aircraft Spruce <http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/wppages/resorcinol.php and Wicks Aircraft <http://www.wicksaircraft.com/catalog/product_cat.php/subid8/index.html have it for 15 bucks a pint, about a third less than Jamestown. I find that interesting--Jamestown caters to the boatbuilding market, while Wicks and Aircraft Spruce cater to the homebuilt aircraft market--I'd expect them to be higher. Wicks and Aircraft Spruce are both old, established companies--you're safe ordering from either.
Resorcinol glue is hardly obsolete, just specialized.
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--John
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Tue, Jun 22, 2004, 5:11pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net (DavidAnderson) says: I am having a problem in finding <snip>
Google. That doesn't work, local telephone book. And, a telephone.
But, I find it interesting you don't actually say what you want it for. Just, "making up bent laminations from thin stock". I'd say regular wood glue'd probably do. If it's cold-moulding a boat, or a bathtub, I might go for epoxy. If it's for an airplane propellor, I don't like flying anymore, so I wouldn't be making one in the first place.
JOAT Use your brain - it's the small things that count. - Bazooka Joe
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To reply to JT's post, my intended purpose is to make continuous bow-back and arms for Windsor chair construction. That requires bending in two planes, and because of the generally small, graceful proportions, the sections are correspondingly light - say around 11/16 x 1 inch. After allowing for 7/16-inch drilling to pass the spindles, there is not much left for error. In the past, I've made them from solid green hickory just like the 18th century chairmakers did, but green hickory is hard to find around here. Even two hours in my steam chamber at 15 psi if the white oak is air dried is not enough to bend without failures. Lamination works fine, but the glue joints have got to be high quality. Resorcinol resin meets MIL spex, but few hobby dealers or Home Depot types will stock it because of the high price. Boat builders will have it, so I guess it is a mail-order task for me. But, thanks for the discussion. Dave
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David,
The preferred wood for steam-bending applications like windsor chair backs - in UK, at least - is ash. The greener, the better.
Apropos the original question, I recently used resorcinol to build up a laminated tiller for a yachtsman friend (English Oak & Teak laminations)
Cheers
Frank

spindles,
hickory
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David Anderson wrote:

I'm a little puzzled as to why you need a glue that will stand several hours immersed in boiling water for a chair.
And Resorcinol doesn't "meet MIL spex", it meets a certain specific mil-spec that was created around its properties. There are epoxies, urethanes, cyanoacrylates, anaerobics, and silicones that meet various MIL specs as well. I would be very surprised if there was not a military specification for white glue considering how commonly it is used.

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....snip

hours
No, no way, hell no! The two hour's in the steam chamber was for solid wood prior to bending attempts. Glued up lamination is a substitute for solid wood..
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David Anderson wrote:

In that case you don't need resorcinol glue--its major advantage over epoxy is that it holds up in boiling water.
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--John
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"J. Clarke" writes:

epoxy
For me the biggest advantage is increased open time.
BTW, forget epoxy with white oak.
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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Tue, Jun 22, 2004, 10:07pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net (DavidAnderson) says: <snip> Lamination works fine, but the glue joints have got to be high quality. <snip>
Which would mean about any wood glue. I understand the rescorcinal leaves purple glue lines. Purty.
I'm thinking you did a real faux pas, when you apparently didn't do any looking. I got a bit curious, so did a quick google. In less than 2 minutes I was deeply involved. Loads of options, rather than just rescorcinal. Plus plenty of information on laminating, bending, glue jig illustrations and information, types of wood, etc. I was way involved for well over 20 minutes, and was only in about the first two-three hits on the first google page. I got a load of information I can use, and wasn't even looking for anything for myself originally. I've saved the google search and will be back in it later.
Anyway, you tried a regular wood glue? I laminate a fair amount of small pieces and works for me. Titebond II is my glue of choice.
JOAT Use your brain - it's the small things that count. - Bazooka Joe
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Great glue, have you checked Elmer's? That's what my brand is.
David Anderson wrote:

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Others have told you where to find it. You do know that it leave purplish glue lines?

what
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