Resin that comes from pine

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I recently built a Pine wardrobe but i am plagued by the sticky resin that is exuding from the knots ,what should I do to stop this
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On Fri, 16 Sep 2005 06:25:37 -0700, javea5 wrote:

Coat of dewaxed shellac.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad scientist com
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Australopithecus scobis wrote:

Not always. At least one thing I built of pine has the pitch come through several coats of shellac. It came from a batch of pine that is *extremely* pitchy. Sometimes you just gotta put it in the burn bin ....
PK
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Did you stain or paint the wardrobe? How long ago did you apply the finish?
I try to avoid areas where pine has a depression with pitch sitting right in it. But I have been able to remove the resin with turps and then fill depression with wood filler and that is that.
If you want to stain the pine, you have to pick your pieces very carefully. The knots have to be attached to the surrounding wood entirely, then you can even stain the piece you are working on and then seal with shellac - more than one coat, say 3 or 4. Then apply whatever finish you want. I have pine pieces done like this where the knots are 2x4" ovals and the finish is intact after 30 years. If a pine knot drops out and you still insist on staining then clean up the area with turps, get rid of any remaining brown areas and patch with wood filler. When the filler is completely dry and sanded level you can use acrylic paint to paint wood grain onto the wood filler, and finish as desired.
If you are painting the wardrobe you still have to clean up any resin you see and any area you think will leak resin with turps and then shellac the area with 3-4 coats and then paint as you wish. Some of the guys said they used wood filler to make a raised area over the shellac - adding a layer of wood filler - and then sanding the "hill" almost flat. I can't make that look good but I thought I'd mention it.
Kilz should do a good job of sealing up pine knots. I'd clean with turps carefully first and then use the oil based Kilz and use a couple or three coats, too.
Josie
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He nailed it; Shellac.
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On 16 Sep 2005 06:25:37 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@msn.com quickly quoth:

This one is TOO easy! The answer is: Don't use pine.
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modern world, is often so overladen with excrescences and irrelevancies
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quickly quoth:

Or, to paraphrase my grandpa, get used to the smell of pine! (or pine pitch)
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Larry Jaques wrote:

You don't have to be that inclusive. Just don't use pine with pitch pockets. I've used pine for lots of stuff, never had any pitch problems.
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quickly quoth:

Agreed. The hardwood only snobs look down their noses at pine, but a lot of very nice furniture has been build out of pine. If one can get over the false notion that pine is junk, one can turn out some beautiful and very long lasting stuff out of pine.
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-Mike-
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Mike Marlow wrote:

but, but, but, Mike? Isn't pine SOFT? Is that a desirable trait for "long lasting stuff"?
Dave
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quickly quoth:

lot of

Ummmmmm... yup - but look around, you'll see tons of that soft stuff that's lasted 100 years. I'm not suggesting it's the same as a nice hardwood, but it sure shouldn't take the knock it gets.
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-Mike-
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Southern Yellow Pine is pretty darn hard and dense. Some pine is soft and some pine is hard. There are plenty of hardwoods that are softer than SYP. I am not sure if SYP is technically a species or if Longleaf Pine and Loblolly Pine are some of the heavy and hard.
Jim B.
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Pine does show it's age but not as bad as you might believe. I have a pine end table and coffee table that my father built in 1975. We lived in Japan then. It has been shipped to eastern Washington, used there for a few years, put into a storage unit for a number of years, brought out and trucked to western Washington were it is now. Still looks pretty good, all things considered.

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David wrote:

Yeah it can be soft, depend on the species of pine. But how else to you get that battered antique look. It's a real bitch beating the hell out of some hardwoods!
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Long before I ever did any woodworking, we bought a Bennington Pine dining room set in 1976. Added the kitchen table and chairs in 1981. Sure, it has a few marks from daily use, but is still in great shape. Quality furniture that is well made. We got the Admiral's chairs too. Sort of like the popular Captains chairs, only larger and more comfortable. I suspect this can last another 100 years or more.
Don't ever let anyone tell you that pine is cheap or not a good material. I've made plenty of stuff from it too.
--
Ed
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On Fri, 16 Sep 2005 20:04:03 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm,

Can if I want. </neener>

Yeah, remember JOAT's pine cone turkey URL last year? Gawdjus!
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quickly quoth:

of
Groan... and I'd almost forgotten until you had to remind us. Curses on you Larry.
--

-Mike-
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"Mike Marlow" wrote

I'm pleased with my latest pine project: http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/ snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net/album?.dirEb2&.src=ph&store=&prodid=&.done=http%3a//photos.sbc.yahoo.com/ph//my_photos
Max
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As you should be. Nice.

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On Fri, 16 Sep 2005 20:04:03 -0400, "Mike Marlow"
There certainly is pine that's not junk, but most of the pine that's available today is barely construction grade, not furniture grade. And most of it isn't pine ayway, but hemlock or spruce (in the UK at least).
I'd select the boards more carefully. I wouldn't necessarily throw resiny pine out as firewood, but I wouldn't use it for wardrobes either.
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