Resawing small logs...

Hi All,
I just got a deal on 5-6 juniper trees, very dead from a fire years ago, and still standing. I took one home yesterday. They are each about 30 feet long, 15 inch diameter at the base. I kept 4 inch and larger, and generally about 4 feet long between the major branches, or sharp bends.
I cut one 4 inch diameter by 36 inch piece into 1/2 inch slabs by jointing two adjacent sides, then the band saw, then touch up one side on the jointer, and finally the planer. Not to a perfect finish, just enough to get the size, color, and any defects. I will smooth after I decide what to build.
Well, that's what I did, but... having no experience in working with actual logs, I'm curious what people with actual experience do when they get a salvaged log. BTW, my band saw does 6 inches max, so I plan to use my chain saw to make the larger logs in half or quarters as needed to fit the band saw.
Any comments will be appreciated!
Rich.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article <0c35295a-bcd4-4688-a71d-

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=&p 127&cat=1,41131,41139
Been looking at these off and on for awhile because I often want to mill something out of a log and have a relatively flat surface when I'm done.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mitch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you are going to do a lot of log ripping with a chainsaw, you need a special chain, otherwise you may burn up your saw. An option, if you use a standard chain, is to saw half way down the log (4' of an 8' log), then allow your saw to rest about an hour, before continuing to saw.
Different kind of sawdust, too. Keep the chain clear of the stringy "sawdust" or the saw could 1) jam and 2) if the bar screws aren't tightened properly, the chain could jump the sprocket (toothed gear at the motor) and screw up your sprocket alignment, .
**Long ago family joke: "Don't play with your sprocket." Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I did a fair amount of this chainsaw lumbermaking. Here's some info and pictures:
http://bullfire.net/Lumber/Lumber.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep, Mr. phorbin's right. Chainsaw mill with a ripping blade on the bar. That cheap one with the integral level would probably do just as well as the expensive one. Maybe invest in a metal detector, if you haven't already? And this is probably the best excuse to upgrade the bandsaw, too, considering all the money you've saved on the lumber. I built a jig that'll hold about a three foot log section (which can get pretty heavy, depending on the species) that travels in the miter groove of the bandsaw. This saves material when compared to the chainsaw's kerf. Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks to all. I did 3 smaller logs yesterday and got some nice 1x4's for later use. Also a stack of 1/2 inch foot long pieces. But that LV guide looks like just the thing for the larger pieces. Most of the logs are 4-5 feet long since the wood is very "knarly" and I cut the sections between bends, and major branch locations. Wish I could split some logs!
Rich.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tom wrote:

I scored some 2-foot diameter red cedar logs a couple of years back. Sawed them in half for benches for my fire pit. Used my little Stihl 025C and let me tell you, it was an ordeal. I didn't have a ripping chain and the long chips were like a rat's nest. Had to clean out the drive gear area about every 30 seconds.
But the benches are great! Almost like the benches in the redwood parks in California from when I was a kid. However, those had backs because they were cut from 4-foot diameter logs!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

on a line at intervals along the length can split it pretty clean.
I used this method to deal with some seven and eight foot by 20 inch logs a few years ago. ...Maple. No way I was going to even try to rip it with a chainsaw.
It's pretty quick and you have to drive the wedges more or less evenly into the log and listen. It's something you can't rush. It doesn't take long and it's pure magic when it works perfectly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.