resawing problems

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I own a grizzly "ultimate" 14" bandsaw, and have tried on a few ocassions to resaw with terrible success. I've tried with and without fence. Last night I tried to resaw a 5 1/2 wide piece of Walnut. Like the other times, the blade winds up bowing pretty dramatically during the cut giving me two cupped boards of varying thicknesses that are virtually useless. Does this seem to be a matter of technique or setup??? (I'm using a 3/8 bladeabout 10TPI I guess)
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On Sat, 09 Dec 2006 05:17:40 -0800, Doug wrote:

Sounds like insufficient tension. If you're using a 3/8" blade set the tension to the mark for 1/2" as a starting point. If it's the factory blade consider spending the 30 bucks for a half-inch woodslicer <http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID 93>. Don't force it, let it go at its own pace--try for a steady rate instead of fast.
If you don't have "The Bandsaw Book" by Lonnie Bird or "Band Saw Handbook" by Mark Duginske you might want to pick up one or the other or both. Both have good sections on resawing and on picking blades for the purpose.
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I'll second the suggestion for a Woodslicer -- HEARTILY! I was having trouble resawing oak (that I felled in my own backyard) with my Delta 14" BS with the blade it came with. I switched to a Woodslicer and it performed BEAUTIFULLY!
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wrote:

I've been using Timberwolf blades. How do they compare with Woodslicers?
I seem to recall that Timberwolf blades claim to be properly tensioned with less tension than indicated with the scale on the bandsaw.
However it happens, for me, my resaws all run beautifully with a 1/2" 3 tpi Timberwolf blade on my Delta 14" bandsaw.
It always comes down to a good blade with sharp teeth.
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On Sun, 10 Dec 2006 02:50:15 +0000, George Max wrote:

Don't really know. I'm still waiting for the Olsens that I got with my saw to wear out <grin>. They're working fine but when I wear out the half inch I'll probably go for a Woodslicer. If it works better than the Olsen it has to be phenomenal.

Yep. And properly tensioned--was going to cut three slices out of a piece of cebil tonight and only got one the thickness I needed because I forgot to set the tension.
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wrote:

With a bandsaw - true. Very true.
But I also meant table and miter saw blades too. May as well include all hand tools too! :)
Sharp matters.
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wrote:

IME: Timberwolf is a mediocre blade at an above-mediocre price. Woodslicer is an outstanding blade at a premium price Olsen is a very good blade at a reasonable price.
Olsen is the blade I use from day to day. Woodslicer is the blade that use when I need a really perfect resaw. Timberwolf is a blade I won't bother buying again.
(I have a 14" Delta BS)
As always, YMMV
To reply by e-mail, use jcarlson631 at yahoo dot com
John
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wrote:

I bought one Timberwolf blade. I will never buy another. If a company can't even get the welded ends aligned properly, there is no point in continuing. I should just throw the blade away as I doubt I will ever use it.
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wrote:

Interesting. What, specifically, has led to your conclusions? Quality of the cut? Visual appearance of the blade? Length of time until it became dull?
I'm interested. Please elaborate.
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I had an old FWW out yesterday and there was an article that applied. Specifically, the bandsaw resaw blade test (M/A '04) Woodslicer came out on top with a 3-4 tpi hook blade. It was the *only* blade that scored an excellent in the smoothness test. The value blade was BC saw at $10. The Olson MVP was right behind the Woodslicer. FWIW, YMMV, etc, etc, etc....
jc
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Doug wrote:

The latter, mostly. Need wider blade and more tension for resawing. Larger is better, also skip-tooth designed for resaw will help. The larger blade will also minimize the need for really high tension.
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Don't you mean that the larger blade will allow/tolerate more tension?
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Stoutman wrote:

That's true, but what I was driving at was that the need to over-tension a narrower blade is alleviated by the heavier/wider blade since they're stiffer.
I noted while in the libarary ( :) ) after the previous post the Grizzly catalog rates the 14" guy as able to handle a 3/4" blade -- whether it has the strength as some other poster noted to adequately tension it or not, I don't know as don't have a Grizzly, but would _assume_ so as Grizzly gear typically will do what they say it will...as a compromise, the 1/2" skip-tooth would probably be good place to start...
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On Sat, 09 Dec 2006 09:16:50 -0800, dpb wrote:

They all _say_ that they'll take a 3/4" blade. Don't bet on many of 'em actually _doing_ it.
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My Jet will take a 3/4" blade, but it is a push adjusting it to where nothing is rubbing that shouldn't be rubbing. I normally use a 1/2" blade.
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J. Clarke wrote:

My HF 14" with a riser kit has had a 3/4" blade on it since the day I got the riser kit installed.
If a HF saw will handle it, it seems likely that just about any other would. After all, they almost all cost more than the HF saw.
Bill
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Sounds like a set-up problem. Beam strength on a 3/8ths blade may be an issue, and you might try different tooth profiles. I get good results with a 1/2 inch hook-type blade with around 5-6 TPI. Check your blade guides and bearings for proper positioning, and blade tension, also. Tom Doug wrote:

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Does this seem to be a matter of technique or

I would say setup. I have a similar 14" Grizzly and it has worked well for oak and pine, but I have used a resaw blade (grizzly's 1/2" 3TPI). Generally wider and fewer teeth for resawing but our 14" saws probably can't tension a blade wider than 1/2". Get Lonnie Bird's Bandsaw book if you need more details. He recommends 6-12 teeth in the material (5.5" * 10 TPI = 55 teeth in your setup) and says that bowing is most likely a result of too little tension. Get the right blade and go slow and I'll bet you'll be happy with the results!
My blade: http://www.grizzly.com/products/H8644
Don't forget to wear a dust mask!
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Doug wrote:

Try a blade few fewer TPI. Also note that some brand blades perform better than others. I had the same problem when I first got my Grizzly G1019 (with the riser kit). Originally I was using Grizzly's 1/2" - 3 TPI blade. Dumping the Grizzly blade and using a Suffolk Timberwolf 1/2" - 3 TPI blade solved my problem.
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Nova wrote:

Agree totally - 1/2" - 3 tpi - SHARP, clean blade (a blade with gunk on it or dull is ok I guess for rough cutting - but just barely ) - tensioned properly (tTry the "flutter method" for tensioning. Expose as much of the blade as you can. Tension as you normally have done. Turn on the saw. If the blade is fluttering - add tension 'til it stops fluttering. If it isn't fluttering - reduce tension 'til it starts to flutter then add just enough tension to stop the flutter. Keep your body parts well away from the exposed blade!) - hook tooth -deeper gullet for sawdust space while in the wood - proper feed rate, erring on the side of slower rather than faster - guides set within a dollar bill's thickness of blade - a fence that is square to the table and adjusted for blade "drift/lead" (you can try and follow a line on the board but even with a "single point of contact guide", you're apt to wander. Decent fence will eliminate or greatly reduce one source of error)
My bet on the source of the problem - not enough blade tension - too many tpi - gullets not deep enough to hold the sawdust "out of the way"
charlie b
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