Resawing on a tablesaw

Is this a good idea? bad idea? I've never tried it, but I have some 1" oak, and I need some 1/4" oak. It cannot be plywood, and I dont have a bandsaw to rewsaw the stock. I could rip the saw down to say.. 3" thick, and resaw it on the tablesaw. Anyone see any problems with this?
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You could rip it to 6" and do the same thing. Make one pass and then flip it over and make the second. You'll lose more to the kerf than you would with a bandsaw but it's done on a tablesaw all the time.
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It can be done... but the risk of kickback is fairly high. You're better off with a bandsaw if at all possible.
If you don't know anyone with a bandsaw you can use, then this project is the perfect excuse for buying one. If the major obstacle to buying one is your SWMBO, just shuffle the order of your projects a bit: find something to make *for her* that you just *gotta* have a bandsaw for. Do that first, then resaw your oak. :-)
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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I can visulaize a tall fence and pushstick that extends over the length of the board helped by push jigs keeping the board against the fence. I made a tall fence for vertical router panel bit and put several coats of gloss PSL on it to avoid any impediment while pushing a slab through.
On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 17:01:18 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

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I'd do it. But only with a featherboard, a zero-clearance and a 3 hp UNISAW or equal. And I would use a 1/8" kerf blade so that it doesn't flex. Only thing that bothers me is that you have 1" oak that you want to saw down to 3". I think you are saying that you have some 1x4's? Is this true?And if you don't have a splitter/pawls, I would be finding another way to do it. A 3" thick board coming back at you is not pretty.
On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 16:54:26 GMT, "js"

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(js) wrote: Group: rec.woodworking Date: Wed, Aug 20, 2003, 4:54pm (EDT+4) From: snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (js) Is this a good idea? bad idea? I've never tried it, but I have some 1" oak, and I need some 1/4" oak. It cannot be plywood, and I dont have a bandsaw to rewsaw the stock. I could rip the saw down to say.. 3" thick, and resaw it on the tablesaw. Anyone see any problems with this? ****************************************************** You can resaw safely on your TS if you are careful and follow certain guidelines. First, do not raise the blade more that an inch at a time, i.e., do not try to make a full cut in one pass. Second, when you get slightly past the center point of the width of the board, turn it end for end, lower the saw blade and repeat the process. This way the blade teeth are never exposed. You can do it ! Peace~ Sir Edgar
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I did the same sort of thing with 1" maple on my POS 1.5hp table saw, and it did work. You have to be extremely careful, but it can be done.
steve
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js wrote:

I've done it (and thicker) on my TS (and it does NOT require 3HP). A zero-clearance insert is helpful - as is a variety of hold-down/ hold-side devices to keep everything where it is supposed to be.
Depending on your blade and feed rate, you may want to make multiple passes to lessen the load on the saw. For 3" stock, you could take two 1 1/2" passes.
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Try to leave a thin center, i.e. don't cut completely through the board on the second side, and use a "cordless handsaw" to finish the through cut. Tom js wrote:>From: "js" snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com

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I've done this in the past, but don't like it. At this point, I've got a bandsaw for the task. But, back the in the days I used the TS, I resawed by ripping a little less than 1/2 way through the width of the board (within the limits of the TS depth of cut) and then flipping the board end over end and resawing the same way through the other edge. This left what looks like a pair of thinner boards joined with a thin rib between them. I could easily separate them with a handsaw, or if lucky, just snap them apart. If you snap them apart, the wood fibers *might* tear into one or the other boards.
This helps avoid kickback.
On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 16:54:26 GMT, "js"

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I do this quite often with Ipe. I advise you to cut no more in depth than your saw is capable of doing easily. Resawing with the blade not clearing the top of the wood requires more power than if the blade clears the top of the board. Cut to just short of half the thickness on both edges. Remember to flip the board end for end on each pass. And remember to not cut past half way. You want there to be some stock left over in the center This piece in the center helps to keep the pieces together through out the operation.
COMPLETE the separation of the halves with a hand saw or reciprocating saw.

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Leon wrote:

I've always cut about an inch into it, flipped & repeated on the opposite edge, flipped again & raised the blade, made the 2nd pass, etc. until all of the way through without problem. BUT I just had a thought..if using a WWII, with a 1/8" kerf: slip some 1/8" shims into the kerf after the next to last pass & clamping them in place. Raise the blade enough to make the final cut. I haven't tried this yet but it sounds like it would be very stable. What do you think?
Scott
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On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 16:54:26 GMT, "js"

I don't - I'm wondering if I'm missing something here ?
If all you're doing is 3" wide, then to me that's just ripping a thin strip. I do it regularly, in one pass.
I'd set the saw up with the good sharp blade (a CMT thin-kerf, until I swap to a bigger motor) and the half-fence. This is a simple MDF false fence that reaches from the front to just short of the the rear of the blade. The thin fence supports the narrow strip while it's cut, then allows it room to spring away from the blade at the back. Being European, the riving knife and guard are already in place.
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