Repost basement shop question (some problem with post)

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I am in a newly built home in Western New York. I just bought the new Rigid table saw from Home Depot - not a Powermatic but good enough for me. I have two questions:
STUD PLATE: I need to wire a small shop. I have single outlet at the panel. I will need walls to attach wires (see errata below for reasons). I want to glue the P.T. stud plate. I saw a message thread that talked about gluing the stud plate to the floor rather than nailing it(I have used a Hilti gun and it obliterates the concrete). How much and what type of glue is needed. I am also planning to paint the floor before affixing stud plate.
OUTLET TYPE: Should I use box outlets or should I use a strip?
ERRATA: As per code here - I have an insulated vapor barrier down 75% of the wall. It extends out approximately three inches from the wall. I also have a floating slab meaning there is a two inch gap between the wall and the slab that allows for drainage all flowing into the sump. The shop has the sump - bummer. I like the idea of a 4x4 notched plate.
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STUD PLATE... I would never glue a plate to a floor and I can appreciate what you encounter by firing a Hilt i into concrete. I have 100 % success with affixing plates to concrete with a simple lag screw and matching molly. Some 15 years ago I attached a long hand rail in the middle of a wide corridor to a terrazzo floor in a middle school no less... using 3/8" x 3" lag screws and the long hand rail is still in place as solid as the day I installed it.
Besides, once you paint your floor any glue will have to stick to the paint successfully and the paint to the floor successfully. I would opt for the lag screw idea... I've installed many, many feet [ miles ! ] of plates to floors over the course of my life and I have tried virtually every means of attaching plates to concrete... nothing works as well as a lag screw with matching molly.
OUTLET TYPE... as long as you use the 3 prong strip type with the grounding socket you will do well, I would say. In other words, there is ( or was ) a cheezy variety of outlet strip... surface mounted... with just a hot strip and a neutral strip... impossible to plug in a 3 pronged machine. Anyway, there's a lot less wiring to do with a long strip as opposed to putting in a number of individual outlet boxes... make it easy on yourself...yet safe for yourself.
ETCETERA... sounds like a ' French Drain ' application in your basement. If the sump pump comes above the floor then get a submersible pump and put a suitable cover over it so someone wont fall into the hole. ( Nothing in this world is easy ! ) I'm quessing you anticipate a water problem in the interior of the basement whereas water needs to be channeled to the basement walls then to the sump. The basement floor should have been ' crowned ' when first built so water would be diverted towards the walls / sump. But you're putting up some wall and want the water to get past the plates to the space between the slab and the basement walls. I hope I'm understanding you post correctly.... if so, I would say this : you are calculating diverting water past the plates because you want to glue your plates to the floor thus sealing you in... but water will get under the plate idea I gave you... the lag screw / molly idea. Use treated lumber where wood meets concrete because of dampness. You can cut a notch to the bottoms of your plates to act as a ' spill way ' for water to pass unobstructed if you think that will get you through. If your basement has a water problem then don't let any sheetrock go below the waterline since it acts like a siphon.
On 23 Dec 2003 19:09:32 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Keith Bozek) wrote:

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Thanks for the response:
The lag molly--> What length and dimension would you suggest and what type of molly - plastic or metal? I am also assuming that I should rent or obtain a hammer drill with a carbide bit? Also, any lessons learned or suggestions for common issues that I might run into would be great too.
I am going to use 2x4 P.T. stock and I think drilling some space holes is also a good idea in the event of a catasrophic flow.
I have no grass yet just a little seepage. Code here requires floating slab and sump. Being near one of the great lakes (Ontario) there is lot of soil differences thanks to glacial till.... It varies greatly in the town I live in. My soil is more of a silty loam while not far down the road it is clay.
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