Replacing fascia boards

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I own a 2000 manufactured home. I need to replace the rotting fascia boards. What is the best wood to use?
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I would use a p.t. pre-primed trim board. They sell those, and they are very good and already primed. They have a treatment that avoid mildew, wrot, and fungus growth. Coming in a 2x6, 1x6 1x4 etc. 2x4 on and on....It is wise to pre-prime ends and cuts prior to installation. john I use the same treated boards in door jambs Here it is called Aura Last.... (or something like that)
"janice" wrote in message
I own a 2000 manufactured home. I need to replace the rotting fascia boards. What is the best wood to use?
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On 11/18/2014 7:44 PM, janice wrote:

How many feet ? Can you use Cypress or or like ? cost is higher, but the wood lasts longer than pine. Just the cost.
Martin
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On 11/18/2014 11:08 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote:

She really needs to find out why it rotted and correct it and be sure the new wood is not affected. . There are wood buildings 250 years old with protected wood still in good condition This was not properly built or maintained if it rotted out in 14 years.
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On 11/18/2014 10:35 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The old buildings were build out of oak and chestnut and other hardwoods. They were clearing land and any tree was available. Some last the longest. Oaks are good.
Cypress has oils that keeps some bugs and rot out. Used in the deep south in place of Redwood of the west. Better than Cedar for most things.
Martin
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On Tue, 18 Nov 2014 22:08:54 -0600, Martin Eastburn

I was going to say cedar, but painting it can be a bit fussy - depending on the cedar.
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By "manufactured home" are we talking a trailer, a double-wide, a prefab like a Viceroy, or what?? I know a lot of the "trailer" type "manufactured homes" are JUNK.
There are a lot (well quite a few anyway) of wooden buildings that have never had any paint or chemical protection that have lasted close to 100 years.
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On 11/18/14, 10:35 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I agree. Use *any* material but make sure you have a drip edge that extends into the gutters.
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-MIKE-

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On 11/18/2014 7:44 PM, janice wrote:

Forget wood, go with fiber cement fascia.
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"Leon" wrote in message
On 11/18/2014 7:44 PM, janice wrote:

I did that for the weather surface but had it backed up with pine so there was a continuous nailing surface for the vented fiber cement soffit... perhaps overkill but I was straightening out the results of 50 years of settling/sagging so I had nice flat and true surfaces.
Solid PVC could be another option.
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I have a '95 and 95% of my facia is fine. I have 2-3 spots trying to start rotting. I plan to either replace or repair in spring depending on closer evalution and condition then. I am hoping the dark spots I see are nothing more than surface crud I can clean.
I'm not certain what type of material mine are made of but I suspect some type of pressed treated material from what I can see. I'll appreciate the suggestions here myself.
`Casper
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"John Grossbohlin" wrote \
Solid PVC could be another option. ************* I am really starting to like that stuff for places you can not get out of the weather. I have replaced several door frames with it now, and it works great. I recently make a new window frame out of the stuff, in a place the window gets splashed whenever we get one of those North Carolina frog strangler rains where it rains at the rate of 4 or more inches per hour. No gutter in a valley can contain all of that.
-- Jim in NC
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On 11/19/2014 10:24 PM, Morgans wrote:

Almost all paint grade spec'ed shoe molding I use in wet areas these days is pvc; and there are an increasing number of profiles available in pvc for other trim elements.
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"Swingman" wrote in message

I've got a project coming up to retrim the interior of my house as part of a room by room gut job. I'm going to run my own moldings/casings and the trim in the bathroom, kitchen sink, and mudroom areas will be PVC... I've got a 3 HP Shaper and a Molding machine and will use both depending upon the specific profile. I figure if I run the PVC while set up to do the wood (probably poplar) that it will take no special effort but will give me a good looking product for longer in the areas that get wet.
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On 11/20/2014 9:48 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Might even consider using 'wood hardener' that is soaked into the surface and makes a hard surface. Kinda plastic. Might keep out the stuff that eats up the wood.
Martin
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On 11/20/14, 5:51 AM, Swingman wrote:

I've used a ton of the stuff. It has its pros an cons, mostly pros. The ends split as bad as wood and the "sawdust" is so clingy from static that it's a real PITA to clean up.
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"John Grossbohlin" wrote

I've got a project coming up to retrim the interior of my house as part of a room by room gut job. I'm going to run my own moldings/casings and the trim in the bathroom, kitchen sink, and mudroom areas will be PVC... I've got a 3 HP Shaper and a Molding machine and will use both depending upon the specific profile. I figure if I run the PVC while set up to do the wood (probably poplar) that it will take no special effort but will give me a good looking product for longer in the areas that get wet. ******************* That may not work as well as you would wish.
The PVC looks grainy when milled, planned and you will probably not like the result.
I found that the parts that touched the extruder have all the grain so to speak, filled in and is more dense with finer particles. It is smooth, but not the material being planned.
It may smooth up if and when it could be flame polished.
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On Thu, 20 Nov 2014 23:30:45 -0500, "Morgans"

A couple coats of paint and a bit of sanding fills the pores and makes it as smooth as paint grade lumber.Particularly if you use a primer/surfaces as the first coat (sandable primer or fast build primer)
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wrote in message wrote: >>I found that the parts that touched the extruder have all the grain so to

This is my expectation.... it is all to be painted and I anticipated sanding, priming and sanding prior to the finish coats of paint...
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"John Grossbohlin" wrote
This is my expectation.... it is all to be painted and I anticipated sanding, priming and sanding prior to the finish coats of paint...
********** I would try lightweight spackling compound and sanding sealer for a coat or two before paint.
-- Jim in NC
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