Replacing a load bearing wall with an I beam

Can anyone point me to a web site that describes how to do this? Thanks Wayne Jones in Ottawa, Ontario
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You might be better off posting in alt.home.repair or in a newsgroup dedicated to building construction.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Maybe I should elaborate. I have a 2 story house. I want to remove an 11 foot interior wall on the first floor. At one end is at an exterior wall and the other end is against an interior wall by a stairway. I am content to have an archway ie place the i-beam under the second story floor joists. My concerns are a) is there anything special that must be done to support the i-beam at both ends and b) the proper method for supporting the ceiling while putting the i-beam in place.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are you sure that it's a load-bearing wall? If not, you won't need to prop it with any beam.

Yes
Post in another newsgroup for a better answer - alt.home.repair for example.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ooops, didn't pick up on your reference to it being load bearing in the title. Sorry
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the responses. I looked for an appropriate NS by searching for renovations and found none. I figured someone on this NS would point me in the right direction. Thanks again Wayne
wrote:

end
a
prop
support
example.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne Jones wrote:

search on building or construction
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne Jones wrote:

Consider using a 2 x header with a flitch plate if it is strong enough, it will simplify the job somewhat. Usually an adjacent temporary wall (or two) is built under the ceiling for support (don't forget to make sure that the temp wall is well supported from below).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 05 Feb 2004 18:27:39 GMT, "Wayne Jones"

First, are you sure this is a load-bearing wall? If not, ignore all that follows.
It's simple, yet complicated. You will need to temporarily support the ceiling above by building temporary 2x6 walls on both sides about four feet back from the wall you are removing. You should jack these into place so that you raise the floor joists above about 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch. Then put your beam into place, and remove the temporary support walls -- gradually, every second stud at a time.
The complicated part is in calculating the size of beam you'll need and how it must be supported. If you live in Ottawa, you probably have a basement. Remember that the new loads you've created must be supported below. That may mean a tele post and new footing by the stair way.
I do this kind of thing for a living, and in your place, I would hire a structural engineer to do the calculations and simple drawings, and to come back and sign off on what you've done. . I doubt it would cost more than five hundred dollars ... and his stamped signature is cheap insurance.
Ken
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne Jones wrote:

In the last year Fine Homebuilding ran an article on this.
UA100
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
We did a major renovation on our house last year. Our contractor, who has been doing this for many years, insisted on engaging a structural engineer, who determined both the size of the steel beam needed, and the size of the footings necessary. The contractor had already poured one of the footings. After the calculations, he had to destroy it and enlarge the hole and pour it again.
You may want to get a structural engineer involved.
Good luck.
--
Ernie M. Eden

"Wayne Jones" < snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 05 Feb 2004 17:43:38 GMT, "Wayne Jones"

Bad things can happen fast with this kind of project.
I'd get an engineer to calculate load points, spans and structural iron specs.
The actual doing of the project involves building temporary walls to carry the load while you remove the bearing wall. It's a simple enough thing to do if you have the experience but what you don't know could get you killed.
Check with a local iron guy and get a price before you go ahead. You may find that his cost is pretty low compared to the costs of failure.
Thomas J. Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) (Real Email is tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article <ehvUb.3437$UMB.2162
says...

No, but you will need to shore up the load on either side of the wall, a bit higher (1/4 +) than final height. Set your beam (sized for the load) on its bearing posts/pocket, and lower away. . .Hopefully, the new beam is not at forehead height! ;~)
Kim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
For this sort of work you likely will require a building permit.
If the wall is a load bearing wall it is entirely possible that you may need to submit engineering drawings in support of your permit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm all for trying new things and doing things yourself, but am I the only one who hears this and thinks, "if you have to ask, you probably shouldn't do it"?
If you're dead set on it, please take the advice of others and get a structural engineer involved. At least in my hamlet, I can't imagine that this would not require pulling a permit.
todd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
todd wrote:

i'm right with ya on that one buddy! this is not as easy as they make it look on tv.
i've done dozens of these and i'm here to tell you that the list of things that can go wrong is lengthy.
a few thoughts...
1.) absolutely going to have to have an engineer figure loads. no way around that. take prints of your house to any lumber yard. someone there will either do the calculations, or call their engineer for you. don't forget that depending on the load and size of the opening, you may need more jack studs under each end of the beam and will likely have to pour footing(s) and add column(s) in the basements under those two points.
2.) if you want to follow the book, definitely have to pull a permit for this job.
3.) take a close look at that wall before you start busting your house up. the walls, in a two story house especially, have alot of crap in them running to the second floor. heat supplies, CA returns, plumbing, electrical, etc.
4.) you have to build temp walls on both sides of the wall you are taking out lest ye intend to put the second floor on the first floor.
5.) unless you live in an old house, there will certainly be, at the very least, some electrical in 11' of wall. somtimes it's pretty straight forward to relocate, sometimes it is a project in itself. if you are not experienced with electricity, plan on hiring that out.
6.) why is everyone talking about steel? i much prefer LVL's. they are not expensive, easier to work with (especially for a homeowner), lighter, and stronger. they can be cut by anyone with a circ saw, lifted into place with two people (be careful, just because it is possible, does not mean it is advisable. no lawsuits please), and you can hang the old joist from it if you want to bury the beam in the ceiling . also you can screw new wallboard right to it - try that with steel.
just a few thoughts. best recommedation - hire somebody to do it.
good luck
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.