Replacing a hot water heater. Efficiency?

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Jay Pique wrote:

Marathon.
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You may want to check out: http://www.waterheaterrescue.com/pages/WHRpages/English/Longevity/the-right-hot-water-heater.html
Of course they're trying to sell their product, but it appears they offer some decent advice. I too am thinking I'll be replacing soon so found this website. Cheers, cc
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HERE'S SOME PROS & CONS OF TANKLESS W/HEATERS:
http://www.chilipepperapp.com/tankless.htm
#################################################### James "Cubby" Culbertson wrote:

http://www.waterheaterrescue.com/pages/WHRpages/English/Longevity/the-right-hot-water-heater.html
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here in buffalo ny: natural gas is cheaper fuel. we had 9 days no electric after the freak october 13, 2006 22-inch wet snowstorm that knocked 1/3 of a million people off the electrical power grid with downed branches. we had no interruption in hot water. [i once wished i bought the ebay showerhead with a generator light in it.] note here a 40,000 BTUH with standing pilot light gas water heater has around a 61 gallon delivery in the first hour. note gas is usually twice the recovery rate with gas at 40 gallons per hour and electric at 20 gallons per hour on the lower priced conventional household units. and winter water to shower water temp is more than a 90 degree rise requirement in this climate. see various manufacturers websites but GRAINGER has excellent comparison specifications information on their website: http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/productIndex.shtml also see extensive choosing and add-ons and troubleshooting of your next water heater: http://www.waterheaterrescue.com/pages/WHRpages/English/Troubleshooting/troubleshooting.html
Jay Pique wrote:

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note that in a cold weather area the heater is generally indoors, so the standby losses help heat the home, thus they really arent lost except in the summer
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I just built a new house 3 years ago and did the finish plumbing and would like to comment on recirculation water. I had a 48' run from the water heater to the shower on the other end of the house and thought it would be wise to put a pump in a loop back to the water heater. I also purchased a motion sensor switch that I put in the bathroom to turn the pump on when the room was entered that also had a manual switch on it so it could be turned off and the pump turned on manually. These are available at Lowes. I insulated the supply and return runs to the water heater. In the end I found the pump and my switch set up were un-necessary since the water would re-circulate by natural convection. I don't know what the situation would have been if I would have wanted to do it to an upstairs floor. I would have had to insulate the pipes going to upstairs walls before covering and so on. My situation was water heater in basement and shower on the opposite end of the house worked out fine. Bill T
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Sun, Oct 22, 2006, 3:09pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (JayPique) doth query here: <snip> I've seen some articles on retrofit recirculating systems, aswell as "on-demand" hot water, <snip>
Dunno, got 'lectric myself, but my younger son does refrigeration, and he says on-demand's the smart way to go, with gas, not electric. I've used 'em oversea and was impressed, "very" nice to be able to have hot water for as long as you want to shower. Those units were a little larger than a lunch box.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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(Jay Pique) doth query here: <snip> I've seen some articles on retrofit recirculating systems, aswell as "on-demand" hot water, <snip>
Dunno, got 'lectric myself, but my younger son does refrigeration, and he says on-demand's the smart way to go, with gas, not electric. I've used 'em oversea and was impressed, "very" nice to be able to have hot water for as long as you want to shower. Those units were a little larger than a lunch box.
I did not see the original post, it must have been x-posted and got snipped. But I've read that you don't really save any (many) dollars with the On-Demand, as the lost heat from the tank ends up heating the house anyway. Not such a good thing in the summer I suppose. But I HATE the lack of hot water in the mornings. So in 30 years when the tank dies, I definitely won't care.
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I hope you guys talking about hot water heaters don't jinx me. I'm home right now having a furnace replaced. I have no idea how old the water heater is. I had an on demand water heater when I was in Japan. I hope that they have gotten better. The best that one would do is give you a luke warm shower. The slower you had the water running, the warmer it would get (more time in the heater). Problem was, if you turned it down to low, the flame would go out but a small amount of gas would continue to flow. This would continue until the gas cloud got to the pilot light and then it would ignite with a ball of flame and sound like a bomb, violently shaking the bathroom wall. Never even considered one of those after that.

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Bill Stock wrote:

From what I've read the "pay back" on the on-demand heaters is about 25 years which usually exceeds the life of the heater. The only way I'd buy one is if my hot water usage required the instant recovery.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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I replaced mine 2 years ago with a top of the line electric Whirlpool from Lowe's. Since I pay about 14 cents per kilowatt hour I have been monitoring my electricity usage for 15 plus years. I paid about $325 for the water heater and know for certain that it has paid for itself in energy savings already.
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As an aside, I've seen people replace water heaters when they stopped heating water, with the cause simply because the heating element(s) quit. I've replaced my heating element 2-3 times over the years, new heating element is about $10. Takes about an hour total, you've got to drain the tank first, which needs a length of garden hose. No biggie. It does call for a special wrench, which cost somewhere over $5. Pus a screwdriver.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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Don't leave out the possibility of the thermostat also. That part is relatively inexpensicd and easy to change out also. If you have hard water/lots of sediment in your water, draining the tank yearly can extend the life of the bottom element and increase the efficacy of the water heater.
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On Mon, 23 Oct 2006 11:33:38 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

I'm sure it's easy enough, but it brings to mind a funny story. When we first bought the house, I figured I'd turn the water heater down a little to save some electricity. The wife had been crowing about how she had worked for an HVAC place at some point, and she knew all about them. So I had her double-check me before I made the adjustment to make sure I was doing the right thing with it. She took the screwdriver out of my hands and started poking inside the case with it- after about 1 second of that, she got a nice jolt of 220. Guess she didn't know as much about it as she said she did...
Yes, the adjustment got made- by me. She's no longer allowed to *fix* any of the major appliances (or paint, but that's another story.)
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Mon, Oct 23, 2006, 3:26pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@business.org (Prometheus) doth sayeth: I'm sure it's easy enough, but it brings to mind a funny story. When we first bought the house, I figured I'd turn the water heater down a little to save some electricity. <snip>
Yep, plenty easy - but make sure you turn the juice off first. LOL
I turned my heater down too, but wasn't thinking about saving on electric. My kids were small then and I wanted it down low enough so even if they turned the hot water all the way up they wouldn't get scalded. It's got a dial with a slot for a screwdriver right at the base of the pointer - don't even need to poke around. LOL
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) writes:

Or the thermocouple for the pilot cracks. An easy USD7 repair.
scott
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Sounds inefficient to me.
Hot water doesn't need to be heated.
--

FF


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