Replacing a closet pole


If it were simple, I wouldn't be asking.
Since I had expected to be hanging some very heavy clothing on the pole in my bedroom closets (don't ask), I decided to skip the traditional cup-type pole supports and instead drilled pole-diameter holes in two of the upper shelf supports (1x6). The poles were cut to the exact width of the closet and the poles inserted into the holes before the double-width "furring strips" were nailed to the wall.
So ... some twenty years later I'd like to replace the poles without destroying the closet. Yes, I could rip out the shelving and side supports and install new stuff but that seems an extreme solution to the problem -- though the only one I've come up with so far that preserves the entire length of the pole which plugging the holes and replacing them with cup-type supports doesn't.
Suggestions?
TIA Norm
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Cut a vertical slot above one hole so that the pole can be lifted or lowered into position. Use a router, or spade bit and chisel to cut the slot. Cut the existing pole to give you access to make the modification.
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On Fri, 25 Aug 2006 14:36:53 GMT, "Leon"

That's exactly how I did mine in the laundry closet. It's still going strong after 14 years, but it can be easily replaced using the vertical slot on one end if need be.
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Good idea. But if that won't work for you, make a scarf joint in the new pole. (24" long). I did this 10 years ago, and the 7' long pole is still holding up some heavy sutff with little sag. Dave
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Norm Dresner wrote:

Cut the pole in half and take it out. Use 2 pieces of pipe (you said the clothes are heavy) and a "joiner thingy", one of those things you use to join 2 pieces of pipe together to make a longer one . Join the two pieces of pipe together with the joiner, put one end in the hole, line up the other one and unscrew it from the joiner until it is tight in the other hole.
-Jim
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The problem with that is the typical 1 piece "Joiner" to make 2 pieces of pipe into a longer run, makes the total length shorter as you screw the pieces together. The pipe would likely fall out of one or the other after the "joiner" was properly fitted on to pipe ends.
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Ok, sorry, I reread what you suggested and agree in principal that your suggestion "Might" work but then another problem comes up. Because pipe threads are tapered the fit becomes loose and sloppy as you loosen the fitting. If you loosen the "joiner" the joint will start to and loose strength and probably bend under its own weight. These threads are not like the typical nut and bolt threads and or do not work like a turn buckle
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That would be a Cup Ling.
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Norm Dresner wrote:

it broke then just un-do what you did 14 years ago and then re-do it again that way. Whats the big deal? Could have been done by the time you posted to this group.
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First just cut the pole in two with a saw and remove it.
Second, cut a new pole to the desired length using the old pole as a guide.
Third, use a spade or Forstner bit the same diameter of the existing holes to drill one of the existing holes about 7/8" deeper. (assumes 3/4" thick stock with some wiggle room). You might very well just drill through drywall... which is fine. Or you might hit a stud... which is also fine. If one end is in an exterior wall drill into the interior wall to preserve your vapor barrier (assuming you have one!).
Forth, stick the new pole in the newly deepened hole, line up the other end and shift the pole sideways into the original hole.
Fifth, drive a 4d finish nail through the support and pole to keep it from shifting.
John
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Why are you replacing the pole?
If it is drooping then add a center support. If it not drooping then why are you considering the change?
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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In my broom closet, I added a closet pole made from steel pipe cut to distance between the shelf supports. On each end, I cut a square piece of garden edging, then welded a piece of garden edging to each end of the pipe. Each endplate has 4 holes drilled to allow screws to secure to the shelf supports. Used a rubber hammer to force it into place.
wrote:

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