Repetitive crosscuts for a box with matched grain

Hi,
I've been trying to figure out how to setup a table saw for cutting the sides of a small box that has the grain matched on 3 sides. If I didn't care about the grain then I'd use stop blocks on the rip fence or for more accuracy a crosscut sled and just cut the front/back then the two sides. But when matching the grain I would need to cut a long side (8"), then a short side (3") etc. Anyone have a good trick for setting this up without using two crosscut sleds? I suppose I could use two stop blocks attached to the rip fence (on the right of the blade) and run the miter gauge on the left of the blade, but it may not be accurate enough. Any other suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks, Chris
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Chris wrote:

With a tuned saw, set to a verified 45 degree tilt...
1.) Make sure the edges of the stock are perfectly parallel. 2.) Cut out the front without stop blocks on the sled. Do this by cutting one miter, then flipping the board and cutting the other. 3.) Re-cut the front miter on each end part. Before you do this the miter will go the wrong way. 4.) Install stop blocks and cut the rear miter on each end part. 5.) Use the completed front to set your stop blocks to cut the back.
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1. Cut a scrap block equal to the DIFFERENCE between the long side and short side. 2. Set the stop on your saw for the length of the long side. 3. Cut the long side. 4. Put your scrap block between the stop and your board to be cut. 5. Cut the short side. 6. Repeat steps 3 through 5 for the second long and second short sides.
DonkeyHody "In theory, theory and practice are the same, but in practice they are not."
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Chris wrote:

Crosscut sled with two stops, one on either side?
Have you considered doing a four-side grain match using the resaw-and-turn-inside-out method?
Chris
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Chris wrote:

Well, before you start straining to set up the table saw, do you have either a radial arm saw or a sliding compound miter saw? What you're trying to do is _real_ easy on an RAS and should be about the same on an SCMS.
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Thanks for all the suggestions. I hadn't thought of the sled with two stops so I think I'll try that. With stop blocks on the rip fence you risk the piece moving after passing the stop blocks. I bought a gauge to set he blade at 45 degrees so with that setup I think I can get an accurate cut.
I have a bootstrap shop - no bandsaw, no miter saw, no radial arm saw - so the four sided match and some other suggestions aren't easy for me. The table saw is a old Rockwell saw handed down from my dad - probably 25 years old by now. It works very well though.
Now, time to make the crosscut sled...
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If you don't want to stop to build a sled just yet, you can just attach a good straight board to your miter gage.
DonkeyHody The Optimist says the glass is half full. The Pessimist says the glass is half empty. The Accountant says the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
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DonkeyHody wrote:

That'll probably work, but I'd encourage making that sled.
I went for a while not even knowing what one was, then went for a while longer trying to figure out how to make a "perfect" sled. In the end, I cobbled something together and kicked myself for waiting so long to have one. I use it most days, and curse it cause it's too big, too heavy, too awkward to store in a small shop and still couldn't imagine being in any shop without one.
Tanus
http://www.home.mycybernet.net/~waugh/shop /
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Use a compound miter saw. Keep a stop block on one side, and swivel the saw back and forth - it works fine for me.... keep the inside of the box facing you shen you cut.
you can use a second stop block set against the first for the different lenghts you need.
shelly
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