repairing "egg-beater" style drill chuck

No, not a power drill, the old fashioned "egg-beater" type. My problem is that the three whatchamcalits in the chuck that grasp the drill bit shaft are loose. I can get them in place, I can even use the drill to make holes. Only they are flopping around in there when not "in use" (i.e. when the chuck is not tightened up).
Any hints as to what I need to do to fix it?
/Par
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Par snipped-for-privacy@hunter-gatherer.org
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I think there are supposed to be springs that keep the jaws spread apart (against the inside of the chuck). There should be small recesses in the sides of each jaw piece where the spring sits. You should have three small springs if you have three jaw pieces.
BruceT

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Ahh, pretty much what I guessed then. No springs; the jaw pieces were in a tin next to the drill in the flea market, got all of it for $3 or so (SKR20) on the theory that it might be fixable. Small springs should be obtainable...
/Par
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Par snipped-for-privacy@hunter-gatherer.org
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Mon, Nov 13, 2006, 6:25pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@hunter-gatherer.org (Par) doth sayeth: Ahh, pretty much what I guessed then. No springs; the jaw pieces were in a tin next to the drill in the flea market, got all of it for $3 or so (SKR20) on the theory that it might be fixable. Small springs should be obtainable...
Yep, that's probably it. If you can't find springs anywhere else, I think ballpoint pen springs are about the right size, but you'd probably have to shorten them a bit if so.
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Par wrote:

I don't know but George will know. Search his site.
http://www.georgesbasement.com /
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I'd pick up either an entire replacement, if you can find the spindle thread, or one of the "keyless" types of the same capacity used on work arbors. They have springs and tapered jaws that close as the originals.
Still have one oddball compression spring in one for my lathe, so you might be able to find one in the proper section at Menards or another borg. Next time sweep the floor before you dismantle it, George....
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Most of those old hand drills have a simple chuck that just uses a spring to open the jaws. It's not a positive movement design like a jacobs chuck. If it's the type that threads onto the shaft to controll the opening, try unscrewing it completely and removing it from the drill. The lower portion, i.e. the threaded end, will unscrew from the shell of the chuck. I can't remember if it's LH or RH thread, and I wouldn't count on them all being the same anyway. After you get it open you may find a broken spring or maybe just dirt & corrosion is binding it up. It would probably be worthwhile giving it a good spritz of some kind of aerosol cleaner, like automotive type brake cleaner, letting it dry, and oiling it before taking it apart.
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I had one of these that needed springs. What I used was the little springs that fit against the tumblers of a lock cylinder.
HB
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