Repairing concrete floor in shop

One more time. (accidentally posted this in a.b.p.w)
My gar^H^H^Hshop has several areas where the surface of the concrete is failing. I'd like to repair it, if for no other reason than it makes rolling tools around a pain. After Googling around, there appear to be dozens of products that claim to repair a concrete surface. What I'd like to know is if anyone has actually used a product for this purpose that they were either happy or unhappy with?
todd
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I haven't Todd, but you might also try the alt.home.repair newsgroup.
--
Larry C in Auburn, WA

"Todd Fatheree" < snipped-for-privacy@NOcomcastSPAM.net> wrote in message
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Todd Fatheree wrote:

I have used some stuff in the distant past called "Concrete Patch" IIRC. That seemed to work pretty well. I think it's some mix of sand, cement, and concrete glue. Be sure to deepen the hole to at least an inch throughout, and brush/blow/vacuum all the crud out. Have fun.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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I helped my son-in-law put a self-leveling concrete floor on his basement. The old concrete had many holes but it did not have major fractures. The self-leveling concrete made a layer about 1/2 inch thick over the old floor. It was a bear to install as one had to work really fast in mixing, applying, and distributing the mixture.
He subsequently put down vinyl flooring and it all looks great. This was about six years ago. It seems to stand the test of time.
Dick

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Hi Todd,
I'm a Highway Construction Inspector with the Ontario Ministry of Transportation. Often in bridge construction and rehab, after removing all scale and loose material, contractors use a product called "M Bed". It's a quick set grout for exterior application (i.e. weathered areas). Do all the prep work (chipping, sweeping, etc.) before you mix the grout. Dampen the surface you are applying the grout to. It will start to set within 5 to 10 minutes. Dump it out of the mixing pan or bucket and spread with a trowel until smooth. The last step if you want a rough surface is to lightly sweep with a corn/shop broom or a damp sponge. Let cure for 24 to 48 hours.
Regards,
Christopher Lang Technical Support Technician Ministry of Transportation of Ontario

they
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You can also use a self leveling concrete from Mapei. The product I use is called UltraPlan1. It will fill up any space, cracks, holes, slopes, etc and will self level. It worked great for me. My concrete slab wasn't broken but had a bad slope that made moving the tools around a pain.
Just make sure you work fast and you don't let it set too long... Each bag cost 40$ CAN so if you have a lot to do, it may add up fast.
Link: http://www.mapei.com/MapeiAmericas/en/products_line3.htm http://www.mapei.it/referenze/Multimedia/Ultraplan1_TD_EA.pdf
Good luck.
Wally
On Tue, 1 Jun 2004 14:11:13 -0500, "Todd Fatheree"

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First enlarge the hole so that all parts of it are at least 1 inch deep. Vacuum out the hole if possible etch the old concrete with diluted muriatic acid. Rinse thoroughly and apply a liquid silicon bonding agent before filling the hole with new cement.
--
Chipper Wood

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What is a silicon bonding agent?
RB
Chipper Wood wrote:

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Look out when using muriatic acid around your cast iron tools in your shop. It will rust the hell out of everything it comes near !

muriatic
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If this means silicone, it certainly is not a material that I would reccommend. There is almost nothing that will stick to silicone. The self leveling concrete will make strong bonds to old concrete.
Dick

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Ask at your local concrete supply outlet.
Bonding Agent A substance applied to an existing surface to create a bond between it and a succeeding layer, as between a bonded overlay and existing concrete pavement.
Concrete has a high silicon content.
POLYMERIC BONDING (AGENTS FOR NEW TO OLD CONCRETE)
* POLYDEE BOND-RES---- BONDING CEMENTICIOUS BONDING AGENT.
* POLYCRYL-PS- CEMENTICIOUS BONDING AGENT
DRIPSEAL-BA-34 (Bonding Agent) It is an Epoxy based formulation specially designed for bonding old concrete and new concrete/ plaster providing monolithic surface. Normally cement slurry is used in such conditions, which does not perform to the satisfaction and shrinkage crack is developed at the junction of old concrete and new concrete. This crack becomes the source of leakage. DRIPSEAL-BA-34 has excellent bonding with almost all types of construction material, so hacking or chipping of old surface is not desired. DRIPSEAL-BA-34 is available in liquid form and two pack system. Both parts are to be mixed and applied on old concrete. Fresh concrete/plaster is laid when the coating is little touch dry.
DRIPSEAL-BA-34 provides excellent bond when used for :- Bonding old concrete and new concrete of slab, and column etc. Bonding old concrete and new concrete in case of repair of pot holes. It can also be used as adhesive for bonding metals, glass, wood, similar and dissimilar materials.
Thorobond Liquid Bonding Agent for Plaster and Portland Cement
--
Chipper Wood

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