Repair a stripped wooden pull


I have an oak pull from an antique dresser. It was mounted from the inside of the drawer with a brass screw. The screw has pulled out of the pull.
I want to keep all the hardware, so I don't want to use a different bigger screw
So the first thought was to drill out the pull, glue in a piece of dowel, and retap. This would probably be the best solution, but the pull is round and I am having great difficulty in holding it firmly enough without the fear of damage to it or me (it would need a 3/8" dowel at least..its really stripped out and made a big hole). And because the pull is round I fear that as I drill it will get away from me. The pull is round and there is no way to get it square.
So the next option would be to fill the cavity in the pull with some hard filler, or epoxy or something like that, then drill a new tap with a 1/8" drill for the existing screw. This I feel comfortable doing since the hole is much smaller.
But I cannot locate any appropriate filler at Lowes or Home Depot that can be drilled shaped etc and will hold the screw. No help from the store staff either.
You help is appreciated.
Jerry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 08:18:47 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@pioneer.com wrote:

Match sticks(the larger wooden ones) work very well actually, or any sliver of wood that will fill the hole in the pull. It also is reversible.
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 08:36:45 -0500, Markem

You can also do it with super glue. Fill the hole almost full and quickly pop a toothpick in and out. This will coat the inside of the hole, giving your screw threads something to grab on to, and leave you with a small "pilot hole". Give the glue a minute to harden up and you're ready to reattach your pull with the original screw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark So then you'd use wood glue to hold the wood fragments inthere? Jerry
On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 08:36:45 -0500, Markem

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 08:55:01 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@pioneer.com wrote:

Depends if it as antique of high value, I would not use a glue at all. Just the wood. Mid value antique, I would also be reluctant to use glue. Run of the mill antique, I would probably use a forstner bit to drill the same size hole as the narrow point of the pulls diameter in 1/2 inch plywood scrap, split it in half, clamp the pull in that with scrap wood the same depth as the pull depth, then drill the stripped out hole on a drill press and fill with a dowel. the redrill the screw hole.
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd use tooth picks. Match sticks are pretty soft wood, and they don't hold much.
And I'd put in a little glue to hold them. Wax on the screw threads would keep the glue from adhering to the screw.
Walt Cheever
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Depends if you want to preseve, do nothing you can not reverse. Value of the item as to original condition can be affected greatly. A match stick or two has parrafin on it and will come out easily.
Mark

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Not sure what the brand name is in the US but I have used 2 part epoxy putties with success to do this job. They are usually a strip which you knead together and get ~5mins working time. There are a number of different types for different materials so check the directions for the best one for wood. Easy to push into odd shape holes and set rock hard. Use excess and sand flat. Then drill and put a screw in first to "tap" the hole. Then put it back on the draw.
Cheers,
Rod.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No need to drill and tap. Get any two part epoxy that will set up hard. JB Weld and Poly Poxy come to mind. Fill hole with same. Dip screw in vaseline or oil, wipe off most and insert in hole. When the epoxy sets up you'll be able to remove the screw and have built in threads. The only hard part might be keeping the screw centered and vertical until the epoxy sets up but that is easily accomplished with a piece of masking tape. Much better than tooth picks. Obviously, you could also forget inserting the screw and just drill and tap.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@pioneer.com wrote:

Way to much thought went into your ideas. Keep it simple. All you do is add some wood to the hole in the pull, e.g., a match stick (old striker kind) or tooth picks. You don't even need to glue them in, but glue them in if you want to. No glue will more likely let the screw center better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use bamboo skewers instead of toothpicks. Feel they have harder stuff.
On Tue, 02 Aug 2005 03:07:55 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well people it worked. I had some slivers of oak that I jammed in the pulls hole and then tightened the screw. Worked great.
But I see a continuing problem.
Since this is an old piece of furniture, there are no door glides..so the drawer (a big one) makes significant contact with the cabinet and so theres a lot of friction against pulling the drawer open. Would a rubbing of beeswax be the safest and most effective means to slicken these drawers?
Thanks Jerry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Jerome Ranch" wrote in message

Absolutely ... drawers have been working that way for hundreds of years. Any wax/paste wax suitable for use on wood , including plain ol' canning paraffin from the super market, will do wonders for reducing the friction of wood on wood.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/07/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Any
of
Ditto. Although, it is probably more important to get any wax in there than the right wax, beeswax is both expensive and relatively soft so it would be my last choice. If you're not a canner, rub a candle in there annually and you'd be all set. If I'm not mistaken, generic white candles are basically paraffin.
-Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.