Repainting WW'ing machinery

I've got a couple of machines that I'm restoring, and I'd like to fully repaint them. When I went to the local paint store the guy started hemming and hawing about new regulations when I asked about thinning it for my gun. I guess I'm just looking for general information about refinishing old machines.
My plan as of now is to sandblast them, prime them and paint them. Any suggestions on what type of paint and primer? I like the look of the Original Saw Co. machines - hammered black I think it is. Any way to duplicate this with an hvlp system?
I'm off to owwm.com and google. Thanks. K{
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On Sun, 3 Feb 2008 14:05:47 -0800 (PST), Jay Pique

That's what I was going to suggest! <G>
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On Feb 3, 6:28 pm, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

I would certainly go there first.
For a floor machine/bench, I would look at the industrial grade alkyd enamels, especially the ones from Coronado Paints. I use them on metal doors, metal handrails, etc., and they are easy to spray and dry really hard. They are abrasion resistant, and stand up to cleaning.
You might want to check this product out too:
http://tinyurl.com/yp2pqs
I haven't used it in my sprayer, but I have used the rattle cans. It works great, sticks to everything and and dries hard. The coloration looks like the old tools. I am thinking of refinishing my Jet mini lathe with this stuff in the hammered black/silver. It would look great.
Robert
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RE: Subject
Sand or glass bead blast back to bare metal, then apply a couple of coats of epoxy high build primer uused by boat builders.
Allow to cure out 2-3 days then shoot with some color of choice Hammerite paint in an aerosol can.
The epoxy primer hardens like a bull"s tool at mounting time providing a great base coat and can be applied with a disposable chip brush.
The Hammerite is also a rust preventitive and is available in various hammertone colors.
Have fun.
Lew .
Lew
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I don't know if you will get any traditional colors, but I have had great success with Seymour paints.
http://www.seymourpaint.com /
I use the MRO industrial lines to paint and repair gym equipment and many quick and dirty metal projects. It is the best rattle can stuff I have found. I got turned onto to it by an industrial engineer who specialized in prolonging the life of old iron.
It is more expensive than the hardware store rattle can paints, but these can contain far more paint solids and are actually cheaper in terms of coverage.
This is their industrial line.
http://www.seymourpaint.com/index.cfm/ind
This is the stuff recommended to me and that I use.
http://www.seymourpaint.com/index.cfm/products/?id
I used top use rustoleum, but that stuff takes forever to dry. I often had to paint over eight days to get one coat of primer and paint on the metal item. I was complaining about this in a group that dealt with gym equipment when this rcommendation came to me.
The name of this paint is MRO Bulk High Solids Industrial Coating.
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wrote:

That's exactly why I switched to Hammerite. You don't really need to prime, and it dries hard in a couple of days from start to finish.

Thanks for the link. I am always ready to pick up on something new in finishing, but bad news. I called them directly and they don't have a distributor anywhere in our area. They suggested I order online, but that means I had to buy 18 cans of product, the pay the shipping on that as well.
I just wanted to try a can on a mailbox to see how well it held up. No dice. 24 cans or nothing.
Robert
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I haven't bought any in years but used to go in on a batch order with a friend or two. This worked out because we were using it in enough volume to buy it in case quantities. I did not know that there was such a large minimum order. I don't think they used to do it this way. The only other folks I knew who used it worked for large companies.
Oh well...
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In the previous discussion I had with the industrial (and chemical) engineers, they said that rustoleum actually put things into the paint to make it take days to dry. That there was no real reason to do this except for marketing reasons. Which seemed very strange to me.
Is having the slowest drying paint on the market good from a marketing point of view? I guess it is like Wendy's touting how greasy (juicy) their hamburgers are.
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wrote:

Yikes. I can't imagine what that would be. In the old days, slower curing resins often meant harder end products or finishes, but not so much anymore.

LMAO. I couldn't agree more.
Robert
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ACCCKKK...GAAAKKKK....UUUUUGGGGG... Sacrilege!!! Spraying a Jet Tool black/silver will surely bring down the wrath of the woodworking gods.
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On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 14:55:48 -0800, bookman wrote:

Why is this exactly? I have a 90's Jet bandsaw that is black and silver from the factory.
--
Steve Hall [ digitect dancingpaper com ]

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Beats me. My only guess is that some are proud enough of their tools they want to keep them in their original colors. I guess it is an identity thing, but don't know.
I saw a large lathe (I believe it was a Stubby) that was painted in that black configuration and it was gorgeous. Jet is such a far cry from Stubby that it cannot be seen with the naked eye, but coloring my lathe may be as close as I get to a $7000 lathe.
Besides, I actually saw this Hammerite on a small horizontal metal mill/lathe and it looked really sharp.
My poor old Jet lathe has so much discoloration from tree bark, wood dust, drips/drops of finishes, etc. that it looks like I ran it around behind truck. Green walnut I got from a friend turned that nice off white to a brownish purple color in some places. Works great and is really clean, just ugly. I brush it down an blow it out after every use, but after ten years on station brushing and blowing the dirt/dust just doesn't get it anymore.
Robert
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bookman wrote:

Powermatic paints some Jet tools gold. <G>
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LMAO!!
How true is that?
Nice shot.
Robert
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