Removing white stains from oak furniture

Hey, does anyone out there know how to remove white water and heat stains from oak furniture?? At one time I knew how to easily do this, but I seem to have forgotten. I would appreciate it if anyone can clue me in, short of refinishing the entire thing. Thanx, Dennis
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Depends a bit on what the finish is.
If it's laquer or poly you can rub with rubbing alcohol and sometimes it will evaoprate it out. Not good if it is shellac.
Alternatively, you can rub with mineral oil and try to displace the water with oil on any finish.
On Apr 6, 10:56 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Dennis Obrien) wrote:

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I know this sounds like an old wives tale but try mayonnaise. I picked this up from somewhere (probably the internet) several years ago but it worked to remove a white cup stain from a piece of production-built office furniture (suspect the finish is lacquer). Apply the mayo to the spot using your fingertips and continue to rub in circles, keeping the stain wet. It took two attempts to get the stain to pretty much disappear.
On the other hand, the effect was less favorable on a piece that I am certain was finished with poly. Helped but didn't fix. The Mayo oil probably had more of a problem penetrating.
RonB
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

With any household wonder-fix, be it true or an old wives' tale, it helps to look at the ingredients and determine what is actually doing the work in the fix.
For years, people have suggested peanut butter for all kinds of stuff, commonly for getting gum out of hair and removing stickers from dishes or cookware. I think most of us could make an educated guess that it's the peanut-oil doing the work. One could save the peanut butter for sandwiches by using cooking oil or mineral oil instead.
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Probably the oil in the mayo. I read up on this somewhere authoratative, can't recall the source, but it was evap or replace ie alcohol or oil. Goes to the peanut butter concept too.
On Apr 6, 12:45 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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My favorite is to take one good cigar, smoke it and save the ashes. Take the ash and rub the ring/spot with it. Even if it doesn't get the ring.spot out it is worth trying. I have use pipe ash to do this and it worked, cig ash didn't.
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sweet sawdust wrote:

Well any excuse to smoke a good cigar works for me, who cares if it can remove white stains or not.
basilisk
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basilisk wrote:

Is there a chance that Irish Whiskey will remove white stains?
basilisk
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Hello,
For white water rings you can:
- apply an oily substance like mayonnaise, peanut butter, or furniture polish. This hides the stain rather than remove it but it doesn't hurt the finish.
- carefully wipe the stain with an alcohol dampened cloth. It is wiped quickly and carefully just enough to leave a vapor trail on the finish. It is best to do this in a low humidity environment so you don't cause a bigger problem. It works immediately but if you over do it, you will be removing the finish. This does not work on varnish or polyurethane.
- mist on some blush eliminator if you have a lacquer finish.
- abrade the surface with things like cigar ash, pumice, rottenstone, or MicroMesh. I am not very big on this technique since it removes the finish.
Except for the first method, you will need to adjust the sheen after you use them.
Heat damage may look the same as a water ring but can be much deeper in the finish. Sometimes leaving it alone for some time works but you could try any of the above methods.
Good Luck.
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