Removing *some of* the paint from a wooden door, smoothing the surface for new paint

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says... >> Wood exterior doors are not code approved in Florida (in

LOL. Glass is allowed, as long as it's impact glass (which is a laminate, similar to automobile safety glass, about 3/8 inch thick).
John
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snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com says...

Can you say "whoosh"?
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On Sun, 22 May 2016 03:33:47 -0000 (UTC), John McCoy

Or Jersey Glass
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On Sunday, May 22, 2016 at 9:47:27 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

or Jersey Barriers
Hard to see through, but it sure would protect the occupants of the house. ;-)
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Probably so but epoxy wasn't all that common back then.
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wrote:

But it is now.
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Well, to be accurate epoxy wasn't all that common back in the 50's and 60's when polyester was widely used, before the problems with blistering became widely recognized.
If you built a boat with polyester in this century you made a mistake (albeit without bad consequences, apparently). Epoxy has been the norm since the 80's; when I started boatbuilding in the 90's it was accepted that epoxy was the only way to go. (the arguement then became whether to use West System, System Three, or Mas epoxy).
John
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On 5/17/2016 9:37 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Absolutely, as will most any product. If something requires a patch, it has arguably started down that road. ;)
The ultimate, usually most desirable remedy is replacement with new.
The question: do you want to spend $X to patch something you can replace for $X +/-; knowing that any "patch" will likely require some future maintenance regardless of the product used to patch?
Recently finished an interior remodel. Previous inhabitant had been confined to a wheel chair. There was not a door jamb in the house that was not scarred, scraped, dinged and gouged by being rammed repeatedly with a wheelchair.
Nothing structural, all cosmetic ... just like the OP's post in this thread, before a trolling idiot introduced a rabbit trail, which we all followed like sheeple. ;)
The client originally wanted to replace all door jambs, but given the replacement cost (demo, cost of material, trim out labor, prime and paint); versus patching options; the client decided to patch.
The painter, as I knew he would, wanted to use Bondo for the patching.
I was fine with that for this job, knowing from past experience that its ubiquitous availability, price, and the time involved from application to ready-to-paint, would give the client the bang for the buck he was looking for in his particular situation.
And, also confident in knowing that this particular painter's success is due in large part to his believe that preparation is the key to an excellent patch/paint job, often in spite of the product being used.
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On Monday, May 16, 2016 at 12:43:17 PM UTC-5, Mr. 2 Cents wrote:

Moron.
I wouldn't want to guess just how stupid you could be as that well probably has no bottom. But how you could compare filling a few cracks and low spo ts to someone that attempted to literally replace entire rotted areas and r ebuild rotted boards is beyond me.
So you found a video by some other nitwit (no doubt of your same intellectu al caliber) that had no idea what he was looking at and decided to compare it to a dissimilar situation. The Bondo was not only the wrong stuff, but it had no reinforcement nor was it anchored properly.
Idiot.
Anyway... Greg when I try to read the whole post and match the repair to th e capability of the repair guy. You have a some good thoughts, so this is only my personal way of handling the repairs you are talking about.
Sand the whole door to make sure there is no other loose paint, no scale, n o damage you didn't see (if it cracks where you are describing, there is mo vement in the joints so what you see won't be all of it until you have fini shed the prep)and determine if there needs to be actual repair work instead of just fill and paint.
The danger of putting new paint over old paint is that the paint holds well enough to hang onto the surface, but the new paint can loosen the previous coats, even if it is oil based.
That's why I power wash the exterior surfaces, then prep. If the paint is going to come off it will come off when sprayed. Then sand. Then examine the damage.
So for an exterior wood door (I am keeping in mind that you are talking abo ut an handyman doing these repairs) I wash and sand, and if there are repai rs needed I do them at that time. If the rails and stiles have separated, t hen I scrape out the rotten or soft wood on the joints, fill them with wood glue (I usually open them a bit more) and clamp. Then I use an 7" gutter screw (or something similar from Fastenal) driven at a 45 degree angle from the stile into the rail. Try to find a screw that is threaded the entire length if you can. These aren't, but work fine.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_122295-205-33047PK_0__?productId284360&Ntt If I find the screws with a head less than 1/2" diameter, I use a washer, t oo. Counter sink the head of the screw, and fill with acrylic caulk after the screw is in place. Do both sides and as well as the top and bottom of the door. I like gutter screws because they come with some kind of epoxy b ased powder coat on them so they won't rust over the long haul.
Now the door is more stabilized. BTW, most doors fail because of wood move ment, and that is usually caused by the painters not painting the door top and bottom. They wick water and start to fail immediately due to the absor ption of water causing swelling/movement.
Rock Hard is great for filling holes, some deep scratches, leveling out a s urface, etc. It is not good for small cracks as it needs to have more mass to hold together than you can get with a small crack. I usually do a two step process on a door that I am picturing as you described.
Fill all the holes and dents with Rock Hard. I use an 1/8" to 1/4" bit to drill into the center of the dents and holes to give the Rock Hard better b ite. With a bunch of holes in a damaged area, you can lay that stuff on pr etty thick and sand it smooth. Be aware that Rock Hard has almost not weat her resistance; if you start the job using that product plan on working it to finish. You can also get it pretty thin too, (think feathered edges) as long as you paint as soon as possible.
For cracks along the joints I use a good acrylic caulk. For cracks in face s, if they are fine cracks I use the same thing. I apply it as close as po ssible with a tool, then smooth it a bit with a wet paper towel.
I use caulk because it penetrates the rough surface of the joints and seals them against further deterioration. As noted above, most likely these cra cks will come back, but if the raw edges are sealed up with caulk it will s low down the process quite a bit. I use caulk on the joinery because doors always flex at the joints. Maybe not a lot, but always, and with all that I have repaired that is almost always "the scene of the crime". Rock Hard will break apart after a while due to this flexing and it offers no protec tion to the surface it is attached to. It isn't made to do that; it is a f iller.
Prime and paint!
Now... if the handyman of choice can't do that, skip the repairs, and apply Rock Hard and caulk, then paint.
Robert
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On 5/16/2016 10:35 AM, Swingman wrote:

Rock Hard makes a great wood filler that can be painted.
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wrote:

Mixes with water no nasty fumes.
+2
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Leon wrote:

You can save some money by buying a bag of setting dry wall compound. It is gypsum - like Rock Hard - too.
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On 5/16/2016 11:35 AM, Swingman wrote:

Wow. Really more answers than I could have hoped for. But the job has been in progress since yesterday and the results are looking acceptable, I think. He's using the Bondo.
Thanks to all.
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On 5/18/2016 10:49 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Gasp! OOOFUUUCCCKKINGGMMMMGGGG, we're done for.
NOT Bondo!!! ... puppies will die, and gigantic holes will be ripped in the space-time continuum.
Say isn't so ...
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Swingman wrote:

Hey - you can't comment Karl. Don't you remember - you were deemed to be a "clown". (by some clown on google groups - who must know what he's talking about 'cause he posted a link...)
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On Wednesday, May 18, 2016 at 11:08:38 AM UTC-5, Mike Marlow wrote:

I am not sure I would trust a post from Karl at this point either unless he attaches a link to an unrelated video uploaded by an idiot shill to further their own agenda. I just wouldn't make sense.
Of course if Karl tells me he is now a member of The Flat Earth Society and he includes a video on making raspberry scones as his proof, I'll take it!
;^)
Robert
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On 5/18/2016 12:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

What's a "scone"??
Is there a Cajun word for that? Got a link?
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On Wednesday, May 18, 2016 at 2:26:38 PM UTC-4, Swingman wrote:

Here you go...
Savoury (Tomato Cajun) Scone
https://mybakingcottage.wordpress.com/2015/07/10/savoury-tomato-cajun-scone/
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On 5/18/2016 1:59 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Merci, mon ami ...
Thought I was the only one who spread little coonies to England.
"Cajun powder"??
Don't think the "d", belongs, cher. lol
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On 5/18/2016 11:08 AM, Mike Marlow wrote:

What is "giggle groups"? ;~)
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