Removing *some of* the paint from a wooden door, smoothing the surface for new paint

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Not exactly woodworking, but ...
Two custom-built wooden exterior doors have developed cracks in the paint, mostly where the original pieces of wood were joined. The paint has flaked off to bare wood in those areas, leaving maybe 1" exposed, but the rest of the paint is in reasonable shape.
We're having a guy come paint the door (this is a commercial building, not my house), but he's a handyman at best (I didn't pick the workman). We'll have to guide him.
After scraping away the cracked paint, what can we do to smooth the edges that are left, and prep the door for (primer and) paint? Do we sand down the edges? Or "putty up" the low spots? Hand sanding? Sander? Grinder with flap disk? Something else?
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On 5/16/2016 9:29 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Bondo wood filler, applied, sanded and painted, is usually what my painters use to repair those type areas in doors.
Robert might have some other tricks up his sleeve, so hope he'll chime in.
YMMV ...
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TM58R79VL98
[note to self; never ever trust any of this clowns repair advice]
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Mr. 2 Cents wrote:

Hear that Karl? Apparently you're a clown...
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On Monday, May 16, 2016 at 2:15:34 PM UTC-4, Mike Marlow wrote:

Nah, it's Mr. Non-Cents that's the clown.
His video response is an apples-to-crocodiles comparison.
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On Mon, 16 May 2016 11:33:25 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Be MUCH better to prime the bare wood and sand the solid paint down to match the level of the primer, then repaint to match. Polyester filler is not designed for use on wood.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Even better would be to sand the bad areas down to feather edges, then prime the bare wood to build up a primer layer, which may take a couple of coats of primer. Then sand this primer area down to flat with the existing paint, and finish paint. Just feathering out the damaged area will most likely result in the repair showing.
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On Mon, 16 May 2016 16:11:37 -0400, Mike Marlow

My experience is feathering paint to bare wood generally doesn.t work too well. Prime the wood, - several coats if necessary, then feather the repair - then paint.
This way you do not have a "raw" paint edge to work with - the paint is always "sealead" to the wood when you are sanding and painting.so the edges won't lift, cut, or curl.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca says...

Then why does the manufacturer call it "wood filler"?
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Perhaps for the same reason TB III claims to be water proof.
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On Tue, 17 May 2016 07:10:49 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Because he found he could sell it as such because people were using their auto-body filler on wood. Doesn;t change the fact it's not really designed for wood.
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On 5/17/2016 11:41 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That is like saying that Honda's are not designed to keep the driver dry in a rain storm since they originally built motorcycles.
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Someone didn't clean the wood down to solid wood. They covered over the weathered cracking window and painted over. The hot sun simply steamed moisture from behind and did the 2-step on the fix.
Epoxy resin is used as a wood preservative. But the wood is cleaned up and bad taken off then it is poured on.
That was like putting on a bandage on a wet wound and the glue doesn't stick.
Martin
On 5/17/2016 5:09 PM, Leon wrote:

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On 5/16/2016 12:43 PM, Mr. 2 Cents wrote:

Even though Bondo wood repair did not last long, it did last longer that what you suggested.
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wrote:

The poster and video people were shills for "Better to use Abatron."
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

And if you look at their bad example of Bondo, it's pretty clear that it's really a bad example of surface prep.
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J. Clarke wrote:

That and the fact that it was used so extensively. Bondo works well for smallish areas but over large areas it will eventually fail. It fails because the wood expands and contracts differentially to the Bondo. The epoxy material material they promote will do the same thing, just slower; it is slower because epoxy has a stronger bond than does the polyester resin used in Bondo.
The exception is plywood and it is an exception because ply doesn't respond to weather/humidity changes as much as solid wood.
Time was that many home built boats, usually trimarans, were built with plywood which was then covered with layers of fiberglass all of which were adhered with polyester resin. In fact, I have a pram I built eleven years ago in that manner; it is still good as gold. Numerous commercial boats were built in the same manner; the Newport 40 ketch was one.
Other than just replacing the rotted wood in the video, the guy would have done better by cutting it out to good wood, then building it up with plywood.
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On Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 9:37:37 AM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

Absolutely true.



it


Great post. All true; Bondo has its place, although not literally as a scu lpting material as seen in the video. I have seen it used extensively as a filler before painting where it worked well. But like any product, extens ive repairs require some familiarity with the product to get maximum perfor mance. The lack of surface prep was really obvious in the video when they peeled back the hunks of Bondo and you could see the rotted wood the covere d. You could also see further deferred maintenance on all the surfaces as well. It looked like an abandoned warehouse to me, so no telling when the work was actually done on those windows, or if it was just another idiot's repair.
Robert
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On Tue, 17 May 2016 09:02:15 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Since polyester filler is not waterproof the wood can rot under the filler as well.
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On Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 11:47:32 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

the product to get maximum performance. The lack of surface prep was reall y obvious in the video when they peeled back the hunks of Bondo and you cou ld see the rotted wood the covered. You could also see further deferred ma intenance on all the surfaces as well. It looked like an abandoned warehou se to me, so no telling when the work was actually done on those windows, o r if it was just another idiot's repair.

Note that as pointed out numerous times in this thread that lack of prepara tion is a great deal of the problem in the video.
What filler is completely waterproof? Solid epoxy finishes are for some ti me, but they break down eventually.
In context of this post, water proof fillers for wood(none of which I know actually are)the fillers are nearly irrelevant except for their ability to hold a sealer and retain elasticity.
In the specific case of this thread, it was stipulated that the door (and i ts fillers) would be painted, so whether or not the filler provides a super ior water proofing on its own as a stand alone product is irrelevant.
You guys make this stuff waaaaay to hard.
Robert
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