Removing accumulated wax / polish

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On Thursday, January 2, 2014 9:32:54 AM UTC-6, Doug wrote:

It was a toss up, Doug. Excellent gumbo and excellent company. Hard to tell which was better. A great time had by all fueled by great food. Doesn't get any better than that.
Robert
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Great food and great friends - absolutely cannot beat that!
Doug

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What methods / products are suggested for removing accumulated wax / polish from furniture? Item in question is an early 60s console stereo cabinet, believe the finish to be lacquer.
Thanks.
Doug
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"Doug" wrote:

Guess it depends on what the person you hire to repair the damaged spots first wants to use.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Doug, why don't you try the repair on a piece of furniture that you don't care about. Maybe pick up something at Goodwill, if necessary?
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Thanks to everyone for their suggestions - naphtha it is!
Please excuse my delayed reply. After several days of trying to find out why my initial message header would not download - along with all replies - tried a suggestion provided by Arthur T. posted on alt.usenet.offline-reader.forte-agent, to turn off filters and sample a range of headers that would cover the date range that was missing. Although I had checked all filters several times - once turned off several new headers downloaded. Good news, however do not know what filter blocked my message.
Now for the rest of the story - I had previously solicited input from the group regarding recommendations for repair of impact damage to the top of a 60s vintage stereo cabinet. The near unanimous guidance was hire a pro furniture repair person.
Was contacted by a gentleman that has a large collection of vintage Magnavox stereos and TVs. He strongly suggested not attempting to refinish the cabinet as the likelihood of a desirable matching result would be slim to none.
He suggested the following - as has been his practice with his collection:
********** 1. Be sure the cabinet is clean. 2. Use a Mohawk touch-up pen that is the same color as your finish...these pens look just like a magic-marker and come in Maple, Cherry, Mahogany, etc., etc. 3. Light scratches will virtually disappear with the Mohawk pen, and deep scratches can be filled with the correct colored furniture stick...which is like a big crayon...you rub it perpendicular to the scratch and it fills it...excess is removed by GENTLY going over the area with 0000 or even 00000 steel wool 4. Get the correct-finish color HOWARD's "restore a finish" liquid...comes in a can. Use 0000/00000 steel wool with the HOWARD's product applied and go over the entire cabinet with the grain...always moving the steel wool gently (i.e. very little pressure). The Howard's product is NOT a harsh chemical that dries like a lacquer, instead, it's very gentle and "feeds" the wood and wipes off easily and does NO harm to the original finish. 5. Wipe off the entire cabinet with a clean cloth towel/cloth. 6. Repeat as necessary if the cabinet still has a bad spot or two.
Unless you really are experienced, DO NOT:
1. Sand or remove the original finish 2. Spray or brush any lacquer or other permanent (i.e. those that dry like paint) restoration chemicals...you will very likely ruin the cabinet beyond the repair of anyone but a real expert. *************
Although the large impact damage cannot be properly addressed with the Mohawk Fil-Stik, I wanted to try it out on the smaller nicks / dings.
I got the best matching Fil-Stik and tried it out - color match was near perfect. Problem was when I went to wipe the excess with either a soft cloth or 0000 steel wool, all material was removed - even that in the depression.
The store manager where I purchased the Fil-Stik was quite knowledgeable about the use / application of this item and suggested that excess wax / polish was likely preventing good adhesion.
He also provided contact information for a pro furniture repair guy for the large impact damage. He commented these guys can take the worst scratch, gouge, etc. and make it appear as if it was never there. Just what I need!
Look forward to trying the Fil-Stik again after cleaning with naphtha and better results.
Being able to fix dings, scratches big / small, and other damage is a worthwhile endeavor - will find a piece that if / when botched up is of no consequence to practice on with shellac / burn in sticks.
Thanks again to all for the benefit of your collective experiences!
Doug

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Hello All,
I'm jumping on this late but, hopefully, with a positive contribution.
I am a member of a woodworking club on Long Island and we are very fortunat e to have a finishing expert among our members. Mac Simmons has graciously shared a wealth of knowledge among our members and has a website where oth ers can access his expertise. I encourage you to go to: http://www.macsimmons.com/ and check it out.
I am to be grouped with those that don't give enough pre-thought and planni ng for the finishing process and find I'm rushing the finishing so I can be , well, finished. I need to allow more time. It is, I hope, a skill to be developed further in 2014. I also need to read posts more carefully to se e who is posting experience and who is repeating what they read elsewhere. Both are valuable but, of course, the former more so.
Happy 2014 to our REC family.
Bill
On Saturday, December 14, 2013 9:06:10 AM UTC-5, Doug wrote:

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On 1/3/2014 12:46 PM, Bill Leonhardt wrote:

of an important step, one not to be rushed.
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Thanks Bill.
Look forward to seeing Mac Simmons' website.
Essence of what I have benefited from others on rec.woodworking regarding finishing is that there are a myriad of ways to botch a finish - from not selecting the proper materials for the wood, to application techniques.
Being remanded to the belt sander for lack of proper planning is to be avoided at all cost.
Doug

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On Friday, January 3, 2014 12:46:36 PM UTC-6, Bill Leonhardt wrote:

ly shared a wealth of knowledge among our members and has a website where o thers can access his expertise. I encourage you to go to:

Bill, there are some nuggets there worth mining, but you should let folks k now that the site heavily promotes his book/CD (absolutely nothing wrong wi th that) and that some of the links to processes redirect you to different sites than his (not good) without warning.
Heads up to the boys, here.
Robert
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