Regluing old table

Page 1 of 2  

I have to rebuild a table that has become loose at the joints/dowels. Not sure what sort of glue was used previously but suspect it may have been hot hide glue. What is the best way of treating the reassembly? Use hide glue again? Clean up all parts and use modern glue? should I remove the dowels that are NOT loose? It is not a masterpiece table, and has been used for holding an overhead projector which has been too much load for it and it has become 'wobbly. I am going to not only reglue, but also add some reinforcing at the corners etc. to make it better able to stand the load. Peter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

hot
I would disassemble the table as best you can and remove all old glue possible with something like an old hacksaw blade .dowels that are still tight leave them alone replace loose ones . reglue with a yellow glue such as tightbond /elmers carpenters glue underpressure with clamps and leave for 24 hours....mjh
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you can clean it up and re-glue wood to wood then use yellow glue. If the old glue is not easily removable then use epoxy.
I would remove all dowels and maybe ream the holes out to the next larger sized dowel.
I think it was FWW magazine that had a whole article on re-gluing last month. I could be wrong, I've read a few other rags lately too.
BW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
After cleaning up joints, they probably will be loose so use an epoxy glue to fill the space.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Frank J. Vitale" wrote:

Do <not> use an epoxy...it won't fill the space w/ an effective joint that will hold and will make any future repair nearly impossible...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Duane Bozarth wrote:

That's why micro balloons are needed to thicken the epoxy; however, straight epoxy will still blow ther sox of any other adhesive you try to use.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank J. Vitale wrote:

You will get a much better bond with epoxy if you add some micro balloons to create a thickened mixture, say about like mayo.
A word of caution:
Microballoons turn the epoxy mixture white unless you are using VERY expensive ($300/lb) pheonilic balloons, so don't use an excessive amount to form a joint unless you want a miserable clean up job.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Microballoons don't really add strength; they're mostly used to create a low-density, easy to shape/sand mixture for fairing, where strength is not important. There are much better fillers if you're after gap filling and bonding strength.
See http://www.westsystem.com/webpages/productinfo/guide/Filler_select.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Roy Smith wrote:

Cab-O-Sil, Aer-O-Sil, etc (colloidal silica) thicken the resin, help with the vertical hang time, and definitely make sanding a bitch when cured.
I have found they do little for me when trying to glue things together.
OTOH, micro balloons tend to form a very gooey glop of adhesive.
As far as redoing a furniture joint is concerned, a flying red horse at 1,000 ft won't be able to see the difference between either approach.
LEW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett says...

Use wood flour or very fine sawdust. Cheap or free.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hax Planx wrote:

Pure garbage IMHO.
Why waste good epoxy when good fillers are so inexpensive?
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett says...

Whatever. System 3 sells wood flour for the very purpose of thickening their epoxy. There is a detailed pamphlet that goes with their epoxy that gives an overview of a variety of fillers. They all have their uses according to the manufacturer. The wood flour gives it a color about the same as hide glue. It didn't waste the epoxy when I used it, whatever you meant by that. The things I glued with it are holding just fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hax Planx wrote:

Wood flour provides a color match, but it does nothing to add strength.
As the old saying goes, "different horses for different courses".
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The one time I needed to thicken epoxy I used fine sawdust and it worked just fine. I don't know where you buy epoxy, but the amount needed to reglue a table doesn't cost very much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
toller wrote:

Sawdust will thicken the epoxy, but does nothing to add strength.
Epoxy is so much better as an adhesive than other glues available for furniture that it probably doesn't make any difference.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

glue
Sorry Lew but after repairing many more chairs than I care to count I agree with Duane. If epoxy is so good why bother with dowels at all...mjh
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mike hide wrote:

Not sure I understand that one.
The epoxy serves as an adhesive while the dowel serves as a structrual member, not exactly the same thing.
Now if you want to make fiberglass dowels held in place with epoxy.............. Naw, don't go there.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

But that's an insane quantity ! They're microballoons - the whole point is they're ultralight.
My tub of phenolic balloons (West System) cost me a "few bucks", I use them for almost all my filled epoxy, and I'm nowhere near using the tub up yet. For a boat with faired mouldings then maybe they're expensive, but for thickening glue then I spent more on shoeleather going to the shop then I did on buying them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy Dingley wrote:

There is ultralight and then there is really ultralight<G>.
The phenolic balloons I referred to were the really ultra light kind used on race boats for the Americas Cup for instance.
Those people are completely anal rentitive about weight.
I use the low cost stuff (7-1/2 lbs/ft3), but you are right, the average woodworker won't use enough microballoons in a year to get concerned about it.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've used a heat-gun an a lot of wiggling to get loose by inseparable hide glue joints apart. The remaining hide glue can be cleaned up with hot vinegar. Use this to clean up the entire joint before re-gluing.
If the dowels are loose then a thin shaving, made with a plane, can be wrapped and glued around the dowel to make it fit tighter.
Since its not a "masterpiece" yellow glue can be used to reassemble.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.