Refurbished Unisaws

Page 4 of 4  


When I was looking at cabinet saws about 6 years ago I compared a Unisaw and a Jet side by side. The salesman walked over and told me not to try to raise or tilt the blade on the Unisaw. The trunion was broken. That was the first time I had heard of that problem but have 8 or 9 times since. Delta blamed the trucking companies and yet Grizzly, Jet, Powermatic, and others were not having this problem. I suppose you could say the truckers were targeting Unisaws. LOL. I think 2 or 3 years ago Delta finally admitted that the trunions were not being properly torqued during assembly at the factory.

That is the way I under stand it. The trip was just too hard on the Unisaws.

Absolutely, Unfortunately the Deltas were not being treated that badly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg G. Wrote: > Leon said:

> service

> The

> admitted

> would

> why

> would

> to

My Unisaw arrived with a large pink label on the box instructing me to check the contents for possible damage. There was a pierce in the box near the bottom. Looked like a sloppy forklift operator didnt have the blades set at the right height and smacked into the saw box. Sure enough, the cabinet base was bashed in. I called Woodworkers Supply and told them, they called Delta, and a new base was sent out that day. When the base arrived I called WW Supply again and asked how to swap bases. DO NOT LEAN THE SAW OVER a very stern voice instructed me. IT WILL BREAK THE TRUNNION.
And there you have it. Unisaw trunnions do break in shipping if they are tilted...of if you lay your Unisaw over to swap bases. The solution is a tilt meter on the shipping carton. It your saw box arrives with a silver meter you are good to go. If it arrives with a red meter, dont even let them take it off the truck. This I was told when I purchased my saw, to check the meter before the saw is unloaded. So yes, the SHIPPERS are not keeping the saws upright, so I guess you can say the shippers are the ones breaking the trunnions. But you could also argue it should be possible to design a saw that can be tipped on its side without damage.
Unless your Unisaw is tilted you're not likely to have any trunnion trouble. Don't know how far over you can tip it before the weight of the stuff on the trunnion causes a problem for it.
Edit: I wont tell you how I single-handedly swapped bases on a 300lb saw without tilting it. However, I claim to have a much better understanding of how the pyramids were built.
--
joe2


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I would imagine simply leaning the saw over wouldn't break a cast iron part.
Dropping the tool into that position, or transporting it that way might. It sounds as if the retailer was being a bit melodramatic.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 12 Nov 2005 02:11:33 GMT, Ba r r y

Maybe the weight of the saw against one side of the unit causes some flex on that side, changing the inner dimensions of the casting and the stress gets focused at the mounting point of the trunion attachments. I have not heard of people breaking them however. Joe Brophy CountryTech Computer email: snipped-for-privacy@spiretech.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 13:18:42 GMT, "Leon"

Leon,
I have a great deal of respect for you through reading your posts but in this case you have been mislead by someone. I've read the threads on this before and there has been much misinformation.
There has never been a problem with the torque setting at the factory on the trunion bracket bolts or any other improper assembly methods. This comment has been posted a number of times and regardless of the original source, it is not true.
The package design has been ISTA tested with the appropriate inclined plane, straight drop and vibrations tests at an independent lab. It holds a transit tested rating. Even so, trunions would ocasionally break in shipment even when the package looked fine on arrival.
In testing to try to find out why they were breaking the only way the trunions could be broken was to tip the unit over and have it land solidly on the front table edge. When this happened there was no packaging damage, the internal damage was concealed. You can't imagine how many sets I've observed broken during that testing process. It is kind of sickening to keep tipping a saw over just to see if you could get a statistical read on what would break.
Changes made a number of years ago were to specifically address this issue. The red motor strap was removed, not to save money but because it was creating another problem. freight dock drivers would drive up on a running pickup and slam fork lift masts into the relatively unprotected end bell of the motor, breaking the end bell and sometimes the motor bracket. The change was to drop the motor down as far into the cabinet as possible, supporting it on the dust chute, to protect it and also to lower the center of gravity to make tip overs less likely.
A device called a tilt watch was added to the package alerting a distributor to not accept the package from the freight carrier if the device had been activated. The only way it could be activated is if the freight dock person had tipped it over.
The only design change on the trunion brackets and trunions was to increase the cross sections where there was breakage and to increase any radii to eliminate the notch effect on impact. There has been no reduction in the specifications for chemical or mechanical properties of the iron as was suggested in some old threads.
There were a number of other changes to the pack to improve the shippability. And after any change the unit was transit tested again by an independent lab.
A broken internal component is a small percentage of returns. Most are minor (cosmetic) freight damage or internal warehouse damage or distributor resets. Many come in and the refurb diagnosis indicates no apparent reason. However, the refurb process is outstanding. You will get a good saw if you buy refurb. My everyday use unisaw is a reconditioned unit.
Why post now? It was/is a company policy not to respond to posts on unmoderated news groups. I no longer work for the company and I do not represent them with this post. It is, however, the truth.
Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank Boettcher said:

Frank,
This was a very informative rundown on the problems associated with the trunnions and as I suspected all along - improper handling by shippers was the cause. I have never heard of one breaking in use. I HAVE, however, see dock crews in action - and it is appalling. I have worked at several large electronics distributors and the damage caused by idiots on fork lifts was a source of considerable loss within each company. I've seen them exceed clearly marked stacking heights, run into equipment with fork lifts at top speed, and tip equipment off the raised lifts.
My only real fear of a refurb saw is the same reason I work on my own cars - stripped threads and fasteners. (Used to be a Mercedes mechanic.) Scratches and dents I can live with. Stripped threads will keep me up at night. I would hope that, like most production facilities, you use torque limited air tools in the plant, but I have no idea.
It is quite interesting to me to hear "war stories" concerning the plant you managed and the tools I purchase. Feel free to pass along any more you feel are interesting. For that matter, a tour of the plant would be a blast. I've toured Ford, GM, and various electronics plants - but never a stationary machine plant.
It is probably a mistake for management not to participate in this forum, as long as it doesn't turn into a P.R. affair. After all, these guys are your primary customers and their ideas are often quite excellent.
Thanks,
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am a happy owner of a Grizzly 1023SL.
Still, for $1299 for a Unisaw that you can get locally, that might be a better deal. First, if you get a Grizzly with a 50" fence, it will raise the price; add shipping and I guess you would be right at $1299.
Then there is the benefit of a local vendor. Grizzly does a great job of after sales support, but it is long distance. If you need a replacement part, it will take a few days to arrive.
Either way, I believe you will get a fine deal.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.