Refurbished Unisaws

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I bought a refurbished Unisaw in 2002. The serial number indicated that it was built in 1999. I would have thought it was brand new if I didn't know it was a refurb.
In my case, it included the magnetic switch that usually costs several hundred extra on a new one.
The 1999 models still had the metal cover over the motor.
The quality of the fit and finish is very good. I like to support made in the USA when possible and it makes sense. (I'll buy the $3 chinese tool for a one-time project instead of the USA made one that costs $12.)
Brian Elfert
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If it helps, the Grizzly is made in Taiwan, the Unisaw is now partly made in Taiwan. The Unisaw still uses traditional non-metric hardware, dont know about the Grizzly.
The cost of a NEW Unisaw 10-in, 3hp, with a 50-in Biesemeyer commercial fence system is only $100 to $200 (s/h included) more than the refirbd unit mentioned above. I opted for the Delta product (new) because of the Biesemeyer fence, an upgraded Grizzly fence meant paying extra for a 2nd fence and getting stuck with one I didnt want or need. Didnt/dont have a clue what Im doing, made the decision on the Biesemeyer fence based on numerous reviews and user comments. Maybe Ill feel differently about the Biesemeyer commercial fence later down the road, but for now Im still tickled pink.
--
joe2

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joe2 said:

Almost everything cast-iron comes from China these days. :-\ Metric/Imperial, who cares - as long as they're not mixed up on the same machine (damned Fords).

I don't know where you are getting your prices, but I've never seen a Unisaw w/50" Beis and tableboard for less than $1699 w/ local pickup. These are going for $1249. Where are you getting that price in 2005 dollars?
Greg G.
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Greg G. Wrote:

I hope we are talking about the same saw I just got my Unisaw last month, model 36-L3B. It is 10-in, 3hp, extended table, Biesemeyer 50-in commercial fence, Deltas mobile base, $1499. Actually, delivery wasnt totally free because there was a $13.00 booking fee.
I just looked at the website, price has jumped $50 ($1549), maybe adjustments for changing fuel costs?!?
http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPRES.exe?PARTNUM6-830A
I'm new to the Unisaw. Are we on the same page with these Unisaws?
--
joe2

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joe2 said:

Well, based on the model numbers, those are old models - Not that it matters to anyone but the marketing department... Pretty good prices, however, even if they are old stock. Newer ain't necessarily better...
Greg G.
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Greg G. Wrote: >

I called Delta about the saw (36-L3B) before I bought it; they said it is current Unisaw product, (1) 36-953 saw, (2) BC50(W?) Biesemeyer Comm Fence w/extd table, (3) 50-284 mobile base. A local retailer told me Delta renumbered their products not long ago and it has everyone confused. Sound right?!?
That website shows inventory on hand, dont believe it. They sell out the Unisaw faster than they can get them in. They sell a lot of Unisaws, even while in transit to ship from 1 of 3 distribution points in the US. When I bought my Unisaw it showed 4 available, down from 10 the day before. When I called to order it, they said only 4 saws actually on a truck in route from Delta/Tenn to distribution in New Mex were still available. The saw arrive at my home a week after I ordered it, literally moved off one truck and onto another.
Edit: anyways, my original point was that a brand new Unisaw + Bies comm fence w/ext table + mobile base can be delivered to you for (now) $250 more than one of those referbd saws.
--
joe2


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Joe: I really am not trying to pull your chain. However, I have seen comments and confusion over the years regarding the need to replace the 1023S fence with the upgraded Shop Fox or a Bies. The 1023S comes standard with the Shop Fox Classic fence which is a pretty close Biesmemeyer knock-off. I have this saw/fence combination on my 1023S. When I purchased my machine Griz was also touting the 1023Z and variants that had the Shop Fox "Precision" fence. In my opinion, and apparently others, the "Precision" fence isn't necessarily a step up - even though it costs more. When we visited the Springfield store just prior to my purchase (four years ago) I mentioned some reports I had read regarding some "Precision" problems to our sales rep. He diplomatically said that his machine had the "Classic" fence and he would certainly buy it again. The "Precision" fence was truly as smooth as glass in the store; but apparently it has several moving parts and I have seen reports of clearance and adjustment issues (which might be corrected by now).
The old "Classic" is built like a fire plug (or a Bies) and has required very little adjustment over the years. I believe Griz is marketing an aluminum version of the Classic now but I know nothing about it. My old iron fence is heavy, smooth, accurate and easy to use.
RonB
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RonB Wrote:

That would be me...confused / ignorant.
Ron-
Not a problem. Thanks for the input. Im new to the world of quality table saws. All I had to go on were reviews, reports, forum threads; mostly stuff I guess should be considered opinions. That I would/could get something wrong is something I expected. Ironically, the neighbor across the street bought a Grizzly a couple weeks before me and didnt say anything at the time. Now being able to see and compare a Griz and a Uni, Id have no problem at all with owning either of them. Without doing a microscopic comparison, my initial impression is the Griz might be a better value, from a consumers perspective. Nonetheless, I still get tool-tingle from that Biesemeyer frence! :)
--
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Greg, I bought a factory reconditioned Unisaw a couple of years ago from Redmond Machinery in Atlanta. My story is long and I won't repeat it here. If you want to read it, cut & past this: http://groups.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/browse_thread/thread/f1c910e450248873/2453276751add9d8?q=donkeyhody+unisaw+saga&rnum=1#2453276751add9d8
Bottom line is that I've been very pleased with my saw, and the way Redmond Machinery took care of me. I have found NOTHING different from a brand-new never-used saw. I'd buy a factory reconditioned saw again in a heartbeat.
DonkeyHody "Even an old blind hog finds an acorn every now and then."
Greg G. wrote:

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DonkeyHody said:

That's the dealer that is local to me... ;-) Thanks for the info - I've only bought some small things from them, and wandered around their scrap yard a bit. It's an interesting place if you like wood and metal working machinery from the early 1900s.
Greg G.
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That would be the way to do it, if you had the time. Get a bargain on a vintage unisaw, have the top flatground, buy a modern motor and link belts and off you go. The first thing I was disapointed with when I received my unisaw a couple of years ago was the thickness, or thiness, of the base sheetmetal. I haven't looked at older unisaws, but they must be thicker.
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rickluce said:

It would be, if you could FIND one. In these parts, I can't find much of anything other than used, broken Ryobi and B & D tools. And the price Redmond gets for a "vintage" Unisaw is pretty steep. Here is an example - $750 - ouch!
http://www.redmond-machinery.com/images/Delta/P1010020.JPG
Whole lot-o-work to get this usable...
I'm not really into restoring old machinery at this point, although I did restore old cars in my youth. And the stories of the widow selling off the "old saw" in the basement for $300 just ain't happening - at least not for me.
Greg G.
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Well Delta has had a problem with Unisaws in the last 7 or 8 years. The factory was blaming the shippers and apparently they have finally admitted to improper assembly methods. Trunions have been breaking at what I would call an alarming rate. If the saw looks like new you have ask yourself why it had to be refurbished as it should have lasted many many years. I would say it is a good bet that the trunion had to be replaced. Something to thhink about.
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Leon said:

I have heard the same thing. When I asked the salesman about it, he denied there was a problem and then stalked off in a huff...
Apparently, however, if you do get an unbroken one, it doesn't subsequently break in service. But it IS worrysome... Is there a crack lurking in there - cast iron is funny like that...
I would say, however, that dropping the saw on it's side - with a huge motor attached - would constitute undue and abnormal stress.
Greg G.
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"Greg G." wrote in message

Old news (there's a contradiction in terms for you) ... IIRC, that problem, not all that prevalent in the first place considering the number of units sold, was addressed/solved at last two or three years ago.
Certainly not something to kill a deal unless one is looking for an excuse, IMO.
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Swingman said:

This was last year - the last time I was caught drooling over a new saw...
Being a local dealer, however, I would think the problem of subsequent shipping damage would rest squarely on the purchasers shoulders.

My problem at this point would be how to get the darned thing off my truck with only two helpers - one of them being a large, but wimpy, friend and the other being SWMBO. Partial disassembly on the pallet would help - but I'm not sure. They claim a weight of ~450 pounds, but from the horror stories I've read concerning moving heavy saws...
I AM lucky to have a drive the runs right up to the door, however. No 250' treks across a wet lawn, down a hill, and around a curving staircase.
Greg G.
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problem,
excuse,
When I bought my 5HP Left Tilt Uni (500+ pounds) several years ago - I brought it home on my utility trailer behind my van - Woodcraft warned me to be careful and not drop it or bounce in the trailer (hit bumps on the road et al ) as it could damage the trunion (when I unpacked it and set it up there was a large very firm block of foam that the motor was resting on - I kept this in case I ever have to move it) - When I got home I made a ramp of 2x10 and slid it down to a moving dolly and then into the garage - the key is taking it slow and easy - don't rush and you could even unload it by yourself - I had a couple of piano movers take a full size upright down a set of steep stairs by themselves and it weighs more than the Uni - remember your physics class and use the correct items to make it easier and safer.
BB
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"BB" wrote in message

remember
A few years ago I had a piano picked up after a flood by a restorer and his smallish 16 year old daughter (a sad story in itself as I found out later, as her mother had died when she was three and it had been her dad and her against the world ever since).
In any event, these two moved that piano down four steps, out to the curb and loaded it into the back of a pickup with a camper on it, by themselves, without breaking a sweat, and in less time than it takes to tell ... it was one of the most magnificent displays of choreographed physics I've ever witnessed. Archimedes would have been proud.
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Swingman wrote:

Back around '71, I was living in a second floor apartment in Albany, NY. Brownstone. Up to the stoop, which was about 8 or 9 stairs. Then up a full, narrow flight with a sharp turn at the very top...first floor ceilings were at least 10' tall, so lots of steps. We bought a new refrigerator. One guy delivered it. I just looked at him, from my 6'2" and 185 pounds (them days are gone forever). He was maybe 5'9 and about 140 pounds, my father's size and weight. I figured I was going to have to help, but he lowered the box off the truck by himself with two straps. He then pulled the cardboard off, slipped a line around it, and hooked that to a tump line around his forehead and slowly walked that 300+ pound icebox up those two flights, walked through the hall and set it in place in the kitchen.
I stood there with my mouth open, during which period he leveled it and plugged it in and took the 10 buck tip I handed him.
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Swingman said:

OK - you all have convinced me. It's not that big of a problem. If one old man and a young lady can move piano - all I have to do is think positive and use the laws of physics to my advantage.
I used to occasionally deliver (1980s) Big Screen TVs to our more picky customers, 'cause our delivery crews were a bunch of animals. We had to pay for Delft plates, broken door trim, etc. One guy grabbed what he thought was a "rock" from the landscaping and tossed it under the wheels of the van (due to a steep grade). The customer had an absolute fit. Turned out it was some sort of imported oriental "lawn art".
Anyway, granted a BS isn't quite as heavy as a tablesaw, but if I can haul one of those alone, I shouldn't have a problem moving a 500 lb. saw to the ground from the bed of a truck, and 15 feet into the shop.
I'll send you guys a card from the hospital... ;-)
I just hope to hell I get a flat table. The contractor saw I bought years ago had such a severe hump in the top, right at the blade opening (the mill skipped, probably due to too heavy a cut), that it would leave a wave on the end of a cut. That was almost the end of my woodworking, as I found I could make a better cut with a circular saw. I read a few books by Ian Kirby and Kelly Meyer, and figured out what was wrong. I ground some of it down myself and starting using a cutoff sled and that helped considerably. But it's still not great - just functional. For 3 times the price, I want this sucker *perfect*.
So, a couple more stupid questions. Does this come assembled on a pallet? What does the table weigh? (i.e. - Would it be beneficial to remove the table before unloading? I have dial indicators and micrometers for re-alignment and would probably do it anyway - just to be sure and to check out the innards...)
Greg G.
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