Refinishing veneer

I have a teak veneer stereo cabinet that has been sitting in the garage for about 10 years under a bunch of garage junk. When I stuck it in the garage, it had a bad water stain on the top. The rest wasn't in bad shape, IIRC.
This piece, if made presentable, would fit nicely into my son's new home. My instinct is to use something like 180 grit on my ROS to clean up the top and then recoat with a teak-colored stain and a couple coats of poly.
Thoughts?
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How thick is your veneer? I'd be afraid of sanding through it.
OTOH, that may be exactly the way to go if the veneer is peeling. Sand it all off and apply new veneer with some glue... I've used Weldwood Plastic Resin Glue with good effect, but started using the table before I really got it done. This thread might be helpful: http://www.homeownershub.com/woodworking/resurfacing-a-table-with-thick- veneer-549000-.htm
Any idea of what the finish is? Perhaps the experts here can help you with that angle.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper says...

If it's teak veneer it's probably Scandinavian or imitation thereof, and those would generally have had an oil finish.
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On Monday, April 11, 2016 at 8:06:51 PM UTC-5, Gramps' shop wrote:

or about 10 years under a bunch of garage junk. When I stuck it in the gar age, it had a bad water stain on the top. The rest wasn't in bad shape, II RC.

My instinct is to use something like 180 grit on my ROS to clean up the t op and then recoat with a teak-colored stain and a couple coats of poly.

This is from my personal experience, and without seeing it personally, you need to take my advice for what you are paying for it!
First, clean the whole piece with a damp to wet cloth, and dry immediately. Scrub it with a toothbrush where needed, but get it clean. Take stock of the damage to the piece and stain.
You did not say what color the stain is, so that could be a deciding factor in your restoration. Check the stain closely after the top is dry and see if the grain is raised. Hopefully, it is raised just a little bit.
Strip the top with a good chemical stripper, not the citrus, or lime based stuff. Get BIX, Jasco or something along those lines. Test a small area (m aybe the size of a nickel) with your stripper to see how long it takes to d issolve the existing finish before starting. DO NOT leave the stripper on longer than you need to, and remember you will clean up remnants of finish with sanding.
Strip. Wash the top with cheap lacquer thinner (mineral spirits will penet rate and can loosen the veneer glue) by putting the lacquer thinner on a ra g and wiping quickly.
Sand lightly by hand with 220/240. NO machine sanding.
Tint (not stain) with a diluted color (I like Behlen's Solalux products as they thin with alcohol) to get to the color you want, one that will help hi de the water stain. BTW, if the water stain is white, that is where the fi nish failed and the discoloration may not be as much as it first appears.
Apply coats of thinned down tint until you get the color you want. I don't like water based tints and don't use them, so speaking only of Solalux, le t the tint sit overnight and apply your finish.
In the case of the using this as a working piece of furniture, a good satin poly, three coats applied by pad or foam brush should give you a very usab le finish.
Robert
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Thank you, Robert!!!

u need to take my advice for what you are paying for it!

y. Scrub it with a toothbrush where needed, but get it clean. Take stock o f the damage to the piece and stain.

or in your restoration. Check the stain closely after the top is dry and s ee if the grain is raised. Hopefully, it is raised just a little bit.

d stuff. Get BIX, Jasco or something along those lines. Test a small area (maybe the size of a nickel) with your stripper to see how long it takes to dissolve the existing finish before starting. DO NOT leave the stripper o n longer than you need to, and remember you will clean up remnants of finis h with sanding.

etrate and can loosen the veneer glue) by putting the lacquer thinner on a rag and wiping quickly.

s they thin with alcohol) to get to the color you want, one that will help hide the water stain. BTW, if the water stain is white, that is where the finish failed and the discoloration may not be as much as it first appears.

't like water based tints and don't use them, so speaking only of Solalux, let the tint sit overnight and apply your finish.

in poly, three coats applied by pad or foam brush should give you a very us able finish.

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On Tuesday, April 12, 2016 at 8:17:14 AM UTC-5, Gramps' shop wrote:

You are more than welcome. I do hope you take some pics and post some befo re and after shots.
One thing to mention if you use Solalux, use anhydrous alcohol if you can f ind a small bottle, or at least 80% alcohol. Normal supermarket stuff is 5 0%, but you can buy the better stuff at a good drug store. It's cheap. I u se the 80% stuff for cleaning sometimes and I buy it at Sam's, but it is a liter bottle.
The reason I don't use water based dyes specifically such as TransTint prem ixed liquids is that they tend to fade, sometimes more than others. They f ade less when they are coated with an exterior grade UV resistant top coat, but fade they do. If you put an interior clear coat (shellac/poly/lacquer ) on top of it you can bet it will fade. This painful lesson was learned i n the refinishing community when pieces left by a window would fade around lamp bases, doilies, and other things left in place over a period of time, often less than a year.
Oddly, the Transtint powders (called "Transfast" hint... hint... )seem to yield a product that is much more UV resistant.
Here's a link, that is just the very tip of the iceberg. The refinishing co mmunity formed several lynch mobs looking for some necks to stretch after u sing the Transtint liquids with poor results. Homeowners used to go to a p rofessional site I participated in and couldn't believe how poorly Transtin t performed after getting high marks from the local know it all at Woodcraf t. An article I picked up somewhere a year or so ago said that a reformula tion has improved the Transtint UV resistance, but I have no personal knowl edge of that happening.
A homeowner will suffer fade and say, "well, we won't move the lamp". Afte r having a professional paid to do the refinishing work, the homeowner will call said professional and ream him out and demand that he refinish his re finishing job. No one wants to do their work twice, so Transtint fell out of favor, as well as did another brand I don't remember.
https://www.google.com/search?q=transtint+dye&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8#q=t ranstint+dye+fade
Note some of the commentary/CYA language up front from Highland, etc.
If a piece is going in the middle of a room, in an alcove or anywhere else that has only indirect lighting, Transtint doesn't fade. Location of the p iece and its exposure is something lesser experienced finishers/refinishers forget to address when making comments. If they get good results upfront, and don't check with clients later, they may not know how a finish perform s over a period of time.
I started using Solalux at the suggestion of a professional refinisher when I was refinishing high end exterior doors. Out of dozens of doors I used i t on, there was no discernable fade after years when I put a UV resistant c oat on top of the Solalux.
I like the Solalux as I can thin the colors down and apply coat after coat until I hit the right shade. I can apply different colors to add them as n eeded, and Solalux is available in a lot of places. However, if you are fe eling adventurous, you can buy several good dye solids (mix with alcohol) s uch as Moser brand and few others online or possibly at a high end wood woo d working store. There are a lot of good dyes out there, but in my opinion, Transtint isn't one of them.
If you hit a snag, post it here. I am checking about once a day these days , and will help if I can.
Robert
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On Mon, 11 Apr 2016 18:06:49 -0700 (PDT)

was the water stain only in the finish or did it penetrate into the wood
if it is only the finish i would use 220 or 320 thne refinish
if it in the wood then the solution depends
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