refinished 5 1/4 on binaries.

I uploaded pics of the 5 1/4 I finished today on the binaries. About 2 days work. Flatening the sole took almost a day, it was very concave. Wish I had a surface grinder...
I also started work on a #4 from the 1800s. I refinished the tote and knob , cocobola I think.. I had to glue the tote back together first. The mouth was all disfigured.. filed it straight across not a big deal since it was behind the blade... No pics... I boxed it back up and left it for another day.. it needs sand blasting, so I can refinish the casting and get rid of the heavy rust.
Thinking of buying the HF sand blasting cabinet. I like refinishing tools, think it might pay.
Back to work tomorrow.
--
Jeff

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I use electrolytic derusting on tools I refurbish as it doesn't remove any of the base metal - only the rust. Art
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On 1/21/2013 8:37 PM, Artemus wrote:

I have also done that, sometimes it doesn't work the way it has on previous parts, so I get frustrated.
Have you had consistent results?
--
Jeff

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I do now, but I learned a few things along the way. 1. An old "dumb" battery charger is far superior to the new ones with a uC in them. 2. Cathode placement and sq-in is important. In general more sq-in is better. Placing a small cathode close to the part being derusted will result in good rust removal near the cathode and poor to nil elsewhere. I use a 5 gal plastic bucket with 2 curved 8x10 steel cathodes(ungalvanized). I recall someone here using lead cathodes with good results but I haven't tried it.
A word of caution here. This process will remove the original japanning from hand planes if you leave then in too long. For my setup 2hrs has been safe. Art
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wrote:

Tell us about the blue paint please.
-Zz
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On 1/21/2013 8:38 PM, Zz Yzx wrote:

That's original paint.
--
Jeff

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"woodchucker" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------------------- Tried the HF blaster without much success and ended up returning it.
Had a 5 HP, 80 gallon, air compressor which wasn't big enough.
Sand blasting requires a LOT of air.
Also think you want to use glass beads rather than sand.
It won't be as aggressive as sand.
Suggest you find a sand blasting company and see if they will handle your job when they are doing another job.
That can be very cost effective, especially if you are not in a hurry to get the job done.
That's what I did a few years ago when I had to have hardened epoxy cleaned out of a bronze gear pump.
Can't remember how much but it was about $10 and took a week or so.
Good luck.
Lew
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On 1/21/2013 8:52 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I was planning on using either walnut or glass. You bought the cabinet? Hmmm. Thanks I only have a 7 gal tank, was thinking of doing short bursts.
Surprised that 80 gal wasn't big enough. That is a big tank.
--
Jeff

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"woodchucker" wrote:

------------------------------------ No, just the open tank with hose and nozzle. ---------------------------------

---------------------------------------------- Reminds me of that old joke about a mosquito trying to rape an elephant yelling, "Am I hurting you honey?"
Lew
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On Monday, January 21, 2013 7:52:14 PM UTC-6, Lew Hodgett wrote: Suggest you find a sand blasting company and see if they will handle your job when they are doing another job. That can be very cost effective, especially if you are not in a hurry to get the job done. That's what I did a few years ago when I had to have hardened epoxy cleaned out of a bronze gear pump. Can't remember how much but it was about $10 and took a week or so. Good luck. Lew
Some time ago, I acquired an old school desk, a nice little project to restore. Brought the framing to a commercial sand blaster. They charged $25, which included priming it, for my painting, later. I had no idea of the priming service, until they mentioned it.
In the middle of their normal work/projects, an assistant prepped my frame, placed it near the sand blaster. The sand blaster just turned to do my project, 15 minutes, then proceeded with his other job. The assistant took the frame to the paint booth and primed it. He had other projects in the works, there, as well. This small project didn't seem to cause any delay with any of their ongoing work.
Not only good work, but certainly neighborly of them to take care of me, that way, in the middle of their busy schedule.
Your plane project looks great. Restoration projects, as these, make for a sense of worth, in more ways than one.
Sonny
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when they are doing another job. That can be very cost effective, especially if you are not in a hurry to get the job done. That's what I did a few years ago when I had to have hardened epoxy cleaned out of a bronze gear pump. Can't remember how much but it was about $10 and took a week or so. Good luck. Lew
+1
Did exactly the same thing a few years back when I sent them a dismantled wheelchair. Had it sandblasted and painted fire engine red which was being used in a current job they had. Approximately a dozen parts = about $50 cost. Pretty happy about that.
Which reminds me, about time I did the same thing again.
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"Sonny" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------- How old was this desk?
Was it the type that had cast iron side rails with a writing surface extending out the back and a seat back with fold up seat out the front?
You needed two units to form a complete desk.
They were lined up in rows and secured to the floor with screws.
Just curious.
Lew
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On Tuesday, January 22, 2013 1:06:54 PM UTC-6, Lew Hodgett wrote:


Probably late 1950s, 1960s model, not real old, as you're describing. All one unit - Stationary wooden writing surface, wooden slat backrest. The area for holding books is, essentially, a sheet metal box, with metal frame to hold the writing surface and metal legs. I restored it for my brother's daughter, when she started school.
I have another one, but haven't restored that one. I'll post a pic tomorrow.
Sonny
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------
"Sonny" wrote:
Probably late 1950s, 1960s model, not real old, as you're describing. --------------------------------------------------- Clearly the "NEW" stuff.<Grin>
I was describing stuff from the 40's and 50's when I was in school.
Reason I asked, I had the same girl sitting behind me in morning homeroom all 4 years of high school.
Hardly ever said anything to each other except "hello" during all that time.
Found out she died down in FL as a result of complications from surgery right after this past thanksgiving.
Time flies, shit happens.
Lew
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On Tuesday, January 22, 2013 9:58:02 PM UTC-6, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Yep. Here's the other desk, hanging in the old shop.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/8408174379/in/photostream
Sonny
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