refinish-kill son-in law???


OK so here's what he did. original finish was lacquer. wiped with mineral spirits to remove wax. wiped with lacquer thinner. Here's the scary part he wiped with minwax stain let sit 1/2 hour and wiped off the excess. Says all I have to do is spray with gloss lacquer and wax. Kicker I have to use spray cans of gloss. Do I take him deer hunting and go oops?
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Get him a fantasy hunt with Dick Cheney.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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Don't know... What's it look like now??? :^)
--
Chris Richmond | I don't speak for Intel & vise versa


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looks ok . Wondering if lacquer will hold
message writes:

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Laquer will hold OK. Just let the piece sit in a ventilated place for a few days to let the oil harden up.
Pete
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two of shellac on there between the two.
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Give it a good while to dry first. If the test area bubbles up, try using a washcoat of shellac before the laquer, that'll do the trick.
Had that problem once before (stain too thick for the laquer to adhere properly, that is) and the shellac did the trick- I diluted to a 1/2 pound cut, and it was enough- without really changing the appearance at all.
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Lee wrote:

I don't understand. Are you pissed because he ruined some priceless antique? Why do you think lacquer won't stick to the surface? Are you afraid of adhesion to pigmented stain or just Minwax products? Why do you care about the delivery system for the finish? I repair with can spray lacquer and spray out smaller projects with canned lacquer with no problem, so I guess I really don't get it. Are you better with a spray rig than with cans?
I am puzzled...
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

The Minwax I have seen is a "Finish" not a stain. The guy at HD told me the Minwax product they had was a stain and I told him if it was, it would be labelled as such. "Penetrates, Stains, Seals" is what they say. Very sneaky is what I say.
http://www.minwax.com/products/woodstain/woodfinish-color.cfm
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Not enough info. Does it look like a screwed-up mess or a good starting point for finishing? I have stumbled into some pretty nice results using similar processes.
A few years ago we started stripping an antique dresser that had a really dark, featureless finish. I took a pass with thinner to loosen things up before stripping and ended up with a lot of color on our rags. We skipped the stripper and worked with the thinner at restoring the original stain for a couple of hours and the result was a wonderful quarter-sawn oak finish. Skipped stripping and let it set for a few days before applying several coats of wipe-on-poly. We would never think of telling admirers that it was an accident.
RonB
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Reminds me of the time someone showed up at a "Aniques Roadshow" with an antique piece of furniture. It was worth $3000. Had they not stripped the old finish off it would have been worth $50,000.
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Yeah, I have seen those too and do have respect for that class of antique. This dresser was not one of them. It was one of the classic oak dressers with mirror and lots of carved trim that you see hundreds of in estate sales and antique shops. They generally run $300 to $1,000 no matter the condition or refinish.
Even Antique Road show has clarified their position on restoration. Supposedly it applies mainly to really old items made in US, generally NE USA or items brought over from other countries. This certainly wasn't one of those. It appeared to be around 1900 - 1920 vintage. Still turned out really nice -- again by accident.
Unfortunately, the one piece we have that might fit the old and unusual class was already redone when we inherited it. It is a large, old side-by-side (bookcase left/desk and mirrored top right) that remains a one-of-a-kind based on our research. Family story is that my great grandfather had it made in the late 1800's. The finish crazed over the years and my folks stripped and refinished it during the 50's. Now it needs another complete restoration because the desk drawers and pigeonholes are falling apart. At least I can do that without worrying about my effect on antique value. All I have to worry about is my effect on aesthetic value.
RonB

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I recently repaired a washstand that belonged to my mother-in-law. It was kind of nice to work on it and see how it has fared over the years. I can see that they used all manner of scraps for internal bracing. Little was wasted.
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Little heavy on the sarcasm.
Why use spray cans? Use HVLP. Or brushing lacquer.
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Or a wiping poly finish
RonB
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