Rediscovering the Wheel, repeatedly

Page 4 of 5  
On 1/7/2013 4:50 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Awww. I was tweaking you on purpose.
If electronic drums are insufficiently attractive, you could wrap them in some nice cherry. Painted, of course.
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On 1/7/13 4:18 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Perfect analogy.
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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It probably is a little smaller, but I have cleverly made up for the lack of space by not crowding it with a bunch of fancy machinery; apart from the one really large piece, that is. But that one is self- propelled and is thus easy to move out to the driveway when necessary.
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Holy crap! If it rains, you're out of business!
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Amy Guarino wrote:

Got a floor?
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dadiOH
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will attest. Even if it were, it would still be a couple feet lower in altitude than guys my age like to work.
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A viable solution... I'd make sure that the work surface is not twisted though. The floor upon which the saw horses sit may not be flat and their could be variance in the sawhorses and 2x4s that result in a non-flat work surface. Being level may or may not matter but being flat does if you are using it as a reference surface. Shims or trimming can be used to true up the surface...
I mention this as an associate of mine made a similar workbench to build a relatively large cabinet. When he was done the cabinet was twisted and didn't fit the "hole" where it was to be installed... the problem was traced back to an untrue work surface.
John
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On 1/6/2013 12:06 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Greg when you get a chance you may want to countersink your jigs screws. You will find that you will keep your jigs, and screws sticking up will scratch your good wood when you are not paying attention. So glue and screw, but keep them out of the way.
Welcome to the world of woodworking. A thousand ways to do something, and a thousand ways to screw up too.
Choose the right one, and nirvana, choose the wrong one and learn. Make the same wrong decision over and over and we've got a letter for you...
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On 1/5/13 11:06 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Next time, try melamine. Glue doesn't stick to it and it's white, so it reflects light making it easier to see stuff.
As to the rest of your post. I'm finding with the more woodworking I do, I enjoy the satisfaction I get from the problem solving and creating solutions for increase efficiency, accuracy, etc., as much, perhaps more at times, than the satisfaction of seeing a completely project. Maybe it's human nature to seek fulfillment in shorter intervals than what would only come at times when an entire project in finished. I don't know. Maybe it's pride and/or stubbornness that makes a man want to solve a problem on his own and not look to another for the solution. That certainly wasn't me in high school. :-)
You may have found yourself on a fun path of making all your own jigs and fixtures... which, again, is often more enjoyable than the actually project you're working on. It's a fun path and a stimulating path for your brain. Some people like to read a book or two a week. I like to create/invent/solve a thing or two a week. :-)
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"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 1/6/2013 11:44 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Absolutely true, and very well expressed!
Notwithstanding all the furniture and cabinets I've built down through the years, if someone asked me what I considered my best work, it would probably be some damn jig I cobbled up to solve a problem in the most elegant way possible.
IOW, to design this:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/MissionChairCrestJig1.JPG
To do this with to utilize an available tool:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionBarStool#5820076950437630034
Was infinitely more satisfying than building any number of chairs and bar stools.
:)
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On 1/6/13 12:33 PM, Swingman wrote:

Tangent..... do you have a bugger pic of that blade guard. That looks like one a guy can work with in place.
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On 1/6/2013 12:44 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/UniGuard.jpg
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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On 1/6/2013 12:46 PM, Swingman wrote:

BTW, because it attaches to the back end of the table itself, and as long as there is nothing (like a necessary fence part/bracket) there to impede installation, I see no reason why it can't be made to work on a table saw with a good cast iron top.
I no longer use it, but have promised it to Pat Barber hereabouts a few years back, that is when either of us get the time to address it, and do all that is necessary to ship it.
AAMOF, I bought it ten years ago from another old time wRec'er from San Antonio, Preston Andreas.
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On 1/6/2013 11:44 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Well be careful with that assumption. Wood glue does not stick to melamine as easily as it does to wood. but I have accidentally glued a piece of wood to my TS melamine extension table and removing the wood also removed the melamine.
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On 1/7/13 8:48 AM, Leon wrote:

I'm sure not all melamines nor glues are the same. I guess I should say, clean up is much easier. Dried up standard yella glue pops right off the melamine in my shop. That doesn't happen with mdf. :-)
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That's my experience also. Likewise hide glue.

Doesn't happen with Gorilla Glue on melamine, either...
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On 1/7/2013 11:12 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

Which kind of Gorilla glue. Urethane or white?
I can easily get Gorilla Glue White wood glue off providing it is not holding a piece of wood to the melamine. ;~)
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The urethane. That stuff sticks to *everything*.
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On 1/7/13 11:46 AM, Leon wrote:

I think anyone who says, "gorilla glue" is talking about the polyurethane stuff. It's like saying "Kleenex." Anyone who says "gorilla glue" when talking about the brand's plain wood glue, needs to be spanked. :-)
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On 1/7/2013 10:41 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

This was TB III not sure what quality of melamine. ;~)

Dried up standard yella glue pops right off the melamine in my shop.

Absolutely! I use a cabinet scraper to remove surface glue.
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