Red oad vs. white oak

Page 2 of 2  


Odd... to me, white oak smells like toast and vanilla.
And red oak smells like cat piss.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And white oak gives those flavors to wine or whiskey.
Used to be that US made barrels were made with kiln dried wood, but now they use air dried like the French have for years. American oak was considered too strong for good wine.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller responds:

I don't often agree with Doug, but that sure seems true of *some* of the red oak I get. Nasty stink.
Charlie Self "One of the common denominators I have found is that expectations rise above that which is expected." George W. Bush
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17 Jan 2005 10:39:06 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Actually, Doug's description is kind -- I think red oak smells much worse than that -- more like the product of peristalsis.

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ Now we'll just use some glue to hold things in place until the brads dry +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


I notice that Red Oak takes on a pink cast when I sand it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote in message

Damn you guys with your color acuity ... I wouldn't know pink if... never mind. :)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ok, Pink is always ... never mind. LOL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When our house was built, my dad was looking at our 7 year old red oak dining room table sittin on our month old red oak floor. "Hey, your table doesn't match the floor." I told him to come back in a year and it would.
IMHO the best finish for red oak is time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 15:26:23 GMT, "Leon"
Try ammonia fuming it - it goes greenish ! If you're after that Craftsman look you may need to use a reddish shellac to tone it down.
Lots of timber has a pink cast when sanded. Freshly green (English) ash is very notable for it - a pure white log can have a pile of sawdust next to it that turns pink as you watch. I think it's an oxidation going on with the freshly exposed surface.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

They are both good woods for furniture. White oak, unlike red oak, rot resistant and can be used outdoors. If you are wanting oak for an indoor project, pick the lower cost one unless one looks better than the other.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Red oak is easier to work after steam bending. If the wood is seasoned, red oak steam bends better than white as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, that's the sort of answer I was looking for. They don't look all that much different to me and red oak is cheaper, especially the riff/quarter sawn.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Warren wrote:

Before committing to it for any major project (that is, one that is going to be quite a bit of time, effort or that you really want to come out nice) I'd take a couple sample boards and finish them as you propose. Unless they're different subspecies or unusual samples from what I've seen, their appearance when finished may be markedly different.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A sure way? Yes.
Get some sodium nitrite (NaNo2) 5% or 10% solution and put some on the oak. If it leaves a dark mark if it is white oak.
From Gene Wengert, forum technical advisor:
Red oak is not always more red than white oak. For example, black oak (which is a red oak) has no red at all. Color is about 50% accurate.
Although red oak will let you blow bubbles, so will some white oak. This test is not too good. Red oak growing under stress will not let you blow bubbles.
There is a test where you put a few drops of sodium nitrite solution on the oak and if it turns dark colored, it is white oak. This test is 100%.
You can separate most white from red by noticing the ray length in the flatsawn portion of the lumber, even on rough lumber. Once someone shows you this technique, it is pretty easy. Most lumber graders and others with experience with both groups of oak can separate them easily.
http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Distinguishing_White_Oak_from_Red.html
-Doug in Utah P.S. I have about 240 senders blocked in this newsgroup so the chances of my seeing a message from you are not that great--but that's just if you are a vexation. :-) =========================== "Warren" wrote in a message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

White oak is basically light brown, without a hint of red. White oak is weather resistant, red is not - red oak turns black pretty quickly when exposed to moisture. White oak is better looking, I think - when quartered, the rays are more prominent.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RE: Subject
If you suspect the piece is red oak, cross cut off an end exposing fresh wood.
If it looks like the termites have had a field day, it's red oak.
Red oak is much more porous than white.
HTH
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Blow through it. All of the oaks have large pores running the length of the grain.
If it's red oak, the air will go through.
White oak has deposits called tyloses blocking the pores, and the air won't go through. Nor will liquids, which is why white oak is used for barrels.
John Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.