Recommended Buy?

This high pressure laminate is available: http://lafayette.craigslist.org/mat/4849661337.html
I'm not knowledgeable of this product, but might these panels be similar to kitchen countertops? If so and though I don't have an immediate use for it, it may be a good buy for future use.... shop table tops, work bench top s. $25 per panel seems very inexpensive.
Sonny
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On 01/17/2015 5:39 AM, Sonny wrote:

...
Picture is so out of focus can't tell what one is looking at; don't look to be thick enough to be countertops; but wording is odd enough not sure it is just the Formica laminate, either; altho I'm thinking it is and it's just awkwardly worded.
<$1/sf isn't bad for that large a piece altho generally one can find remnants and overstock at outlet places when needed if one doesn't care about colors, etc., ...
If you think you're going to be using something of the sort and have a place to store it and it's convenient, it's not a bad deal I'd judge but I wouldn't call it a steal...but then again, it's been 15 yr since I last bought any for the "lab" bench for the basement when made the move back to the farm so don't know what has happened on pricing since. W/ the current slide in oil, should eventually begin to show up on such things altho won't have affected this guy yet certainly... :)
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On Saturday, January 17, 2015 at 9:12:30 AM UTC-6, dpb wrote: but wording is odd enough not sure

It says laminate faced panel, so I'm assuming it is formica attached to a substrate. *The guy is not answering his phone, either.
Sonny
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On 01/17/2015 9:25 AM, Sonny wrote:

I read what it says which is why I commented...there's no discernible edge on the front dark-colored sheet so can't tell it's thickness at all; the two light-colored show an edge but are so indistinct/blurry they could be birch ply or then again could be laminate...who knows?? I'd assume nothing w/o seeing or a much better photo...
For the latter, it's a Saturday morning... :)
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Got a call back and spoke with the guy, at length. He's a commercial contr actor, moving his warehouse to here... so I don't have to travel 35 miles t o his old warehouse, where the pic was taken.
The formica is on 3/4" and 7/8" AB ply. That sounds promising. I'll prob ably buy it. He'll be available Monday morning.
Says he has lots of other construction surplus, also, including 1"+ composi te lumber, nice wide widths. These might be great for jams and framing sc reens, for the screened-in porch at the farm. Good timing, as we're ready to install the jams and screens. https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N 04/16099566568/
Sonny
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On 01/17/2015 12:38 PM, Sonny wrote:

That does, indeed...if have place to store, go for it...

Too bad he's too far away; would probably take a look otherwise, meself...just as a note, those would be "jambs", not a spread for your toast in the morning... :)
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On 1/17/2015 1:38 PM, Sonny wrote:

Looking good.
--
Jeff

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On 1/17/2015 12:38 PM, Sonny wrote:

Keep in mind that if both sides of the 3/4 and 7/8 ply are not covered with the plastic laminate the panels could warp. Most all laminate manufacturers advise that both sides be covered. Now having said that I have installed plastic laminate on 6~7 kitchen and bathroom counter tops in the past 25 years and never covered the bottoms an there have been no issues.
Just something to think about especially with these Large panels.
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On 01/18/2015 10:18 AM, Leon wrote: ...

I've _never_ seen a countertop w/ laminate both sides...it'd essentially double the cost and "ain't agonna' happen!".
Counter tops are fastened down to eliminate the problem; one would presume his purpose as bench top, etc., would do the same.
If they just sit around for a long period of time they'll bow on their own simply from sag unless fully supported. Moisture would be something of a lesser issue unless it's a tremendously damp environment I'd expect, but still of some effect if were in a basement, say. Since I see they're located in LA, it surely is going to be wet as compared to SW KS here... :)
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On 1/18/2015 10:40 AM, dpb wrote:

If you read any of the manufacturers install instructions they advise to put the laminate on both sides. As for doubling the cost, the manufacturers do offer a bottom side grade laminate, that is not as thick, at a reduced cost.

To help eliminate the problem, I have seen counter tops warp that are on OSB and like material. The bigger the panel the bigger the issue. Wood products do expand and contract with climate changes even the relative stable ones.

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On 01/18/2015 11:50 AM, Leon wrote: ...

...
No they don't...
1) Installing preformed counter--note there's nothing but the substrate showing on the bottom as they're gluing on the edge strips and nothing said about adding any--
<www.formica.com/us/~/media/north-america/documents/products/en/shared/ftb_0832_howtocountertopinstall_en.pdf>
2) Laminating a substrate surface directly instructions--
Never says a thing about doing the second side...
For a cabinet side, sure, you'll want the finished look and/or it'll make cleaning, etc., much nicer, but for the underside of countertops, simply put, "no"...
I'd guess you'd be hard pressed to find even one example in the wild...
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On 1/18/2015 1:01 PM, dpb wrote:

Ok, what this refers to is a factory fabricated counter top with back splash, a totally different material.
What the OP is considering is a 65"x70" flat sheet with plywood as the base and no knowledge as to what prep the material has to guard against bowing or warp.
But to be clear
From the Formica site and their Fabrication advice pdf file. Pay particular attention to the bottom paragraph just above the link to the PDF file.
PRE-CONDITIONING The most important factor in achieving stability in bonded panels is the preconditioning of core materials, surfacing and backing laminates prior to bonding. Pre-conditioning ensures that the effects of differential movement, caused by the materials’ reaction to changes in relative humidity, are minimised. The following procedure will allow the laminates to reach equilibrium; any subsequent movement, caused by changes in humidity, will then be equal on each side of the bonded panel and the risk of bowing will be greatly reduced. Decorative laminates and core materials should be conditioned before bonding so that all materials reach equilibrium and are neither too dry nor too damp, the latter being most important at the time of pressing. Optimum conditions are best achieved in a dry storage area (about 20°C and 50-60% Relative Air Humidity).
The sheets that will form the opposite faces of the same composite board are best conditioned as a pair, with their sanded backs together. Sheets paired in this manner should be stacked, covered, and left for a minimum period of three days in order to reach moisture equilibrium. This will ensure that they achieve near identical moisture contents prior to so that bonding, and any subsequent dimensional movements will therefore be similar in both magnitude and direction on each side of the composite panel.
Wood-based core materials should have a moisture content of around 9%. The moisture content of laminates cannot be measured with a normal moisture meter, but it is essential that the face laminate has the same moisture content as the corresponding backing board. If the composite boards are to be exposed to constant low relative humidity in their subsequent application (e.g. radiator casings), the laminates and core materials should be pre-conditioned in warm dry conditions for a suitable period in order to pre-shrink the materials and so avoid any subsequent shrinkage stresses.
Panels and boards faced with decorative laminate will nearly always be required to have the reverse side faced with a similar material to counter-balance the effects of dimensional changes that may take place
http://www.formica.com/uk/~/media/emea/documents/knowledge/fabrication-advice/eu_fabrication_advice_guide_english.pdf .
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On 1/17/2015 6:39 AM, Sonny wrote:

If the bond is good yep. The laminate is more expensive than the cost of the panel.
--
Jeff

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On Sat, 17 Jan 2015 10:38:05 -0800 (PST)

Sounds like no matter what you'll find stuff you need that he doesn't gotta like those situations
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replying to Electric Comet , Twouguictim wrote: I am interested in buying a Makita LS 1016L Compound miter saw.. Is this a worthy thing to buy?
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On Sunday, January 18, 2015 at 4:38:41 PM UTC-6, Electric Comet wrote:

Not that I definitely had an immediate use for these panels, but I could se e the potential of having nice formica panels for possble use. The idea wa s, if the formica was already applied to a good substrate, then these panel s should be a pretty good bargain and I was to grab them, while the grabbin g is good.... and especially at this cheap price.
The more I've thought about them, the more ideas, for use, I've had.
If bought, I wouldn't expect to use them in their present size... I'd cut t hem to more reasonable, useable sizes. As is, I'm sure they are heavy as h eck. 1) The bathroom, at the farm, needs a sink/vanity, hence a countertop. 2) The porch area, at the farm, has a proposed sink area (cooking area), wh ich would need a countertop. 3) My shop could use another, more narrow, outfeed table for the jointer an d planer. 4) The recent bandsaw purchase might could use infeed & outfeed (fold up-do wn?) tables, especially for resawing lengthy lumber, which is the main reas on why I bought this large bandsaw. 5) My youngest brother lives at the family's old homestead house. He is up dating the wiring, for insurance purposes, and doing a few other updates, l ike replacing the bathroom cabinet/vanity/countertop. He wants a panel, if they are appropriate.
I don't anticipate whole-scale shopping for lots of other supplies, but the composite boards are of interest. I have no idea what he may ask for them . I do/may have an immediate use for 8"(?) wide boards.... I'd need about 300 linear ft. Comparatively, 3/4" X 8" X 12' PVC, at Lowes, is $50 a boar d; similar size composite boards are $70 each.
Sonny
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The guy's name is Ed. Among other things, Ed's company installs commercial bathroom stalls, which was what the large panels were for, stall walls. Some other company manufactures the panels and Ed orders them, to spec, for installation. The panels had formica on both sides and all edges. On the phone, Ed told me the substrate was plywood.... At the warehouse, he said MDF.
He had stall doors w/ & w/o the hinge & latch hardware. The doors are 27" W X 58"L, just about perfect for infeed/outfeed or side tables, or for a ba throom vanity. I bought 6 w/o hardware, for $12 each. The notches/slots w ere not yet cut out, for the hinges/latchs hardware, so the edges were smoo th/intact.
The composite boards were few and random widths. I passed on those.
Some time ago, our office building had some storm damage, roof leaked (kinn a old roof, anyway), damaging the suspended ceiling tiles. The roof was re cently repaired and we need some replacement ceiling tile. The guy had ab out 20 cases of 2'X4' tiles. I have a panel, to see if it matches our offi ce's tiles. He wants $5 per case, for the tiles.
Sonny
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On 1/19/2015 5:04 PM, Sonny wrote:

$5 per case is pretty good I think. I did my basement in the 2x4 tiles and they were somewhere around $26 - 27 in 1999.
Not sure where they are now in price.
--
Jeff

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On 1/19/2015 4:04 PM, Sonny wrote:

Laminate on both sides, good!

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