Recommendations for a trim router?

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Hi, I'm about to buy a trim router and looking for a few recommendations. I've read some online reviews, but none seem to pick out a particular brand that stands out above the others. I'm tempted to get a Dewalt DW673K trimmer, but thought I'd ask for a few recommendations first.
Thanks
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That VS Bosch Colt works pretty good. The Ridgids suck. Of course, Festool makes a nice one LOL... only $ 500-ish. In the countertop business...yes, I build counter tops, the Makita has always been a work horse. Just don't drop it. Adjustments are a bit finicky but will stay put.
Upon further reflection, I'd suggest the Makita. You can use bits without bearings which only gum up anyway.
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that
but
I have the Dewalt and I got the complete kit with all the bases, even including the seaming base and I have been very satisfied with it. There are some other brands on the market that have clear bases so you can better see the cutting point and the Dewalt doesn't come with a clear base, so I made my own from clear Lexan.. That was my only complaint with it and I have solved it very easily.
Charley
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are
see
I was going to buy a Dewalt trimmer, but I had great difficulty finding a dealer here in Canada. So, on the recommendation of a dealer I trust, I went with a Makita, but upgraded to one with a chip deflector and an integrated work light. With a little effort, I should be able to jury-rig some sort of vacuum attachment to the chip deflector.
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On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 09:03:14 -0500, Upscale wrote:

I'm looking at trim routers myself. The Bosch Colt gets a lot of good reviews, but the Makita has better visibility - including a couple of LED lights to illuminate the work. I think that's what I'm going to get.
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Mine are old, they have two little candles next to the slot where you stick the key to wind it.
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On Jun 12, 10:59 am, Robatoy

I was thinking about you when I was reading this thread. I haven't made a kitchen full of laminate in so many years I couldn't count them. That's why the trim routers stay in their cases.
No matter how many years I have been contracting, it is still a thing of joy for me to see a talented craft person apply their trade. I love the guys that make it look easy.
To see a full time top/laminate guy apply his trade quickly, easily and accurately in a large odd shaped kitchen is sure a humbling experience. That is why my laminate efforts are confined to bathroom vanities and kitchen islands.
That is why my laminate trimmer has very low miles, and all the attachments even less.
Robert
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I think it would depend on what I was using it for. If was going to do laminate work, I would look at the DeWalt. I have one with all the attachements, and it is a really nice, smooth running router. The dark bases didn't bother me as I was used to it. The big selling point was all the accessories.
But if was to want a router for edging (only) of laminate and easing over edges on wood, I would probably look to another one with a clear base and an LED to let me see what the bit was doing.
Robert
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I'll be starting off by trimming some 3/8" acrylic to be used for shelving for an entertainment unit. Considering what I've read about trim routers, they appear to versatile little tools. I'm sure I'll be able to invent a number of uses for the one I'm buying.
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If you are going to be trimming 3/8 acrylic....are you sure you want to use just a trim router? VS is a must.
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3/8" is probably too much for a laminate router. That is a load for one of these small machines, and unless you have found some really, really easy stuff to cut it will not be pretty when you finish cut as the router won't have enough power to push through the cuts evenly. Trying to buff out rough spots or irregularities in acrylic from an uneven cut is nothing less than painful.
Just thinking out loud here... you might want to reconsider unless you have personal experience cutting the particular acrylic material.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Not sure about acrylic, but I did 1/2 inch nominal pine with a VS Bosch Colt, 3/8" Veritas straight bit with bearing, taking off up to 1/4" in a pass. It worked fine, didn't bog it down either, but noisy as hell.
Light sand, and finish, wife was impressed, so.... ;-)
--
Froz...

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Somebody wrote:

When working with acrylic, the magic words are "QUICK" and "FAST".
Take light cuts and don't allow the router bit to slow down, if you want a clean cut.
Using any trim router, I'd limit cut to 1/16"/pass with the final cut being 1/32".
Taping the cut line and cutting 1/8" proud with a good bi-metal saber blade would be a good start.
Lew
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I assume you're talking about taping the line so the edges don't shatter too much? As I mentioned in a previous messages, the acrylic has already been cut on a tablesaw, but it's about 3/32" oversize so that's all I need to trim off with whatever router I use. But, thanks for the suggestion. I'll keep it in mind when I decide to use the 48" x 30" leftover waste piece from the full sheet I purchased.
Can I assume that a decent jigsaw blade would work as well as a saber blade to cut this stuff?
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"Upscale" wrote:

May not be correct, but I use "saber saw" and "jig saw" interchangeably; however, unless the blades are Bosch Bi-Metal, they are unacceptable in my shop.
Leave it to the Swiss.
The trick when cutting acrylic is to keep the blades sharp and don't rush it.
Excess heat generated by cutting is your enemy.
Lew
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Yes, and you want some course teeth with a bit of a rake. Metal- cutting blades will not work well...melts the plastic. The Bosch T101B works great on acrylic even it has no 'external rake' and the 101AO, if you go really slow and if you need to make tight turns. I exclusively use Bosch, and replace them more often that needed and then keep them for demolition and such.
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wrote:

I cut 1/2" acrylic for a living. 3 1/2 HP and I trip breakers and break 1/2" bits. 3/8' would be 75% of that load... 2 1/4HP minimum, if they're real horses. You always run the risk of the crap melting and puddling around your bit seizing any and all opportunities to burn, break and destroy stuff.
I have even shaped 1" thick clear acrylic. The more aggressive the bit (chip removal) and the more horsepower, the better.
I use trim routers to pick my nose and dislodge that stubborn pepperoni from my teeth. 2 HP to clean my nails. A weedwhacker to comb my hair. I use a 20 pound sledge to hang a picture of my favourite mom!
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"Robatoy" wrote

With the right bit, they'll even get that "old man" hair out of ear holes ... but go ahead and have your coffee first, it helps to be fully awake.
--
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Last update: 5/14/08
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I would sometimes watch the odd episode of Friends with one of my daughters. In one of them, Joey had just said something dumb and Chandler said: " You're supposed to stop pushing on the Q-Tip when you feel resistance!"
Your post reminded me of that. <G>
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"Robatoy" wrote

LOL. I remember that one ... I too watched "Friends" with my youngest on a frequent basis before she went off to college, and in the summer when she was home. I believe she still has all available years on DVD.
We established a similar pattern when she was much younger. I'd pick her up at school and get us home in time to catch the early "Seventh Heaven" episodes together. Now, IMO, that was a rare TV show with strong family values and good moral content. AAMOF, it gave me the opportunity to answer/discuss many of her questions on life in general while watching that show together. I've noticed in the past few years that a number of her judgments, based on those very same values, have been reflected back in the way she's handled situations as a young adult.
As much as I deride the general content of TV today, shows like "Seventh Heaven" were a rare learning experience for a youngster, and an opportunity for a parent to discuss/reinforce moral behavior.
I hope it's still on, and still serving that purpose.
Watch that nose hair trimming bit ... a climb cut will make you sneeze, for sure!
--
www.e-woodshop.net
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