Recommend Repair Please?

Page 1 of 2  
My sweetheart wife, who I am trying to teach respect for things like plumbing, most evidently allowed a pan to knock a crescent shaped hole about 1/6 as large as a dime in a dark side of our electric garbage disposal (hopefully, there's not a crack I can't see). The disposal has a "plastic" case. Now, of course, comes through the hole when the water faucet is turned on
You folks are the most "handy" folks I know--in fact, practically the only ones! :)
What is a good way to repair this? Patch? Epoxy?
Thank you, Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
fixed typo:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The epoxy or JB weld will work well, but since it's a drain, and not a pressurized supply line, some high-grade duct tape - not the cheap stuff - would probably be fine (Gorilla Tape is good stuff for this kind of thing). Just be sure to degrease and thoroughly dry the area to be patched.
Scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here are some details concerning the Gorilla tape:
Maximum Temperature (Fahrenheit): 150 F. Minimum Temperature (Fahrenheit): 33 F.
J-B Weld has a much broader temperature range (up to 300 F. as I recall).
I appreciate ALL of the suggestions! Thank you very much!
To krw, who suggested a new disposal, I would ask: Why replace when repair may be successful and done in 1/20 of the time? A new one might even have a leak in it, or another defect,..and where would I be then? I've just been a home-owner for a little over 3 months, no doubt I'll pick up some plumbing skills as I go along. I recently bought a "FloodStop" unit for the washing machine (which shuts off the water if water hits the ground)...I'll start by installing that! : )
Thanks again, Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Would YOU have bought the house with a patch on the garbage disposal?
Plan on any patch to be temporary. When you go to sell the house, you won't want the patched GD killing the deal.
By the way, if hitting the side with a pan (and what was a pan doing under the sink?) was enough to put a hole in the GD, the plastic may be getting weak with age and be ready for a replacement anyway.
Brad
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sure, it is cosmetic, not structural. Even if it was broken, I'n not going to walk away from a $300,000 house for a $150 disposal replacement.

Take a look at one and see how it is built. http://www.kitchenaid.com/flash.cmd?/#/category/132 / You can break away the plastic outer shell and have a perfectly working disposal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But the OP said water was coming through the hole...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Actually, he said "now" comes throughthe hole

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Brad Bruce wrote:

I bought my first house w/o a garbage disposal, my second house had one, but it didn't work at all... Had it worked, but had a patch, I guess I would have passed on the deal? $200,000 house... $75 GD... Seems iffy...

Garbage disposals are temporary to begin with. Nothing lasts forever...

I'll say. I don't think I could put a hole in mine with a pan, even if I were trying... Have never really tried, but still...
--
Jack
Using FREE News Server: http://www.eternal-september.org /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bought the house with a patch on the garbage disposal?

I bought the house even though the garage needed approximately $2000 worth of cleanup (by doing the work myself, I think I can clean it nicely for about 1/4 of that)! "We" really liked the house and "likeable" ones in our price range are scarce in our neck of the woods. Of course, when I first looked at the grimey floor, I thought maybe $300--but there was a (fluid-leaking) boat, and ox-acetylene welding equiptment, etc. in the garage in the way the day I saw the house and made an offer.
The good news is the J-B Weld has been applied. Following Lew's advice, I roughed it up with some 80 grit first and cleaned the surface with 99% rubbing alcohol (it took off plenty of blue paint or plastic). I had to apply the stuff by reaching around where I couldn't see (used HF blue nitrile gloves)...the first batch seemed like it sank into the hole--immediately applied a second batch and it left more of a patch. It looked pretty good via a flashlight and my wifes mirror (my error not to have borrowed that before I applied the stuff)! There is a 15 hour set time, so I'll know more tomorrow. Coincidently, our hot water heater broke yesterday too..but somehow that doesn't bother me as much... Thanks again to everyone who helped me with this problem!
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bill" wrote:

Got any ideas how old the tank is?
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've got the receipt: Made by A.O. Smith, gas, 76 gallons, 6 years old --$145 (seems awfully cheap).
It's leaking hot water from the top--evidently theres a pin-hole sized hole in the "shell", very close to where the hot water goes out (the plumber seemed to try very hard to repair it for an hour or two; I provided his final diagnosis). Replacement of the heater is covered under home warrantee, except for "modifications"--which are evidently are going to be in he in the neighborhood of $325--because it's backed into a corner where a light sink will have to be taken out, a gas line moved and the exhaust adjusted. I think he's asking a little much, but I'm not sure there's much I can do. I could ask him to leave the new heater in the garage and shop around. But I'm not sure how much I could really save. In the meantime, we still have hot water when we need it (the heater just leaks-quite a bit). As the problem is worse since his visit, I've been shutting off the incoming pressure to the heater when we are not using hot water. Please don't trouble yourself with this one Lew--please save your energy for helping me to see my way through my workbench project! : ) I'm getting closer and closer to the concrete-grinding, epoxy flooring, and garage painting, and TS ordering projects, after which I can begin physical work on the workbench.
Concerning the workbench, I have been thinking about how to make the almost square vertical supports--i.e., the ends, plus at least 2 more (from SYP). I could glue 1" thick boards, say 6" wide, together so that the bench top will rest on end grain. Is SYP appropriate for all of the parts (these supports, plus drawers and shelves) ? When I get closer to having a finished design, I hope some of the readers here will critique it. Having fun.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bill" wrote:

It's called tank replacement time.
If the budget can handle the inital investment, take a look at tankless hot water system.
Higher inital cost, but significantly lower operating costs resulting in lower total cost of ownership.

Think about glue ups from 2by? (1-1/2" thick) stock at least 8-10 maybe 12 wide. (fewer defects to cut out).
Let others comment about SYP.
Drawer bottoms want to be plywood.
Can you get it cut by somebody else then seal with shellac before you get near it?
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The tank is covered under our home warranty, so we'll let them give us a new one this time around. Of course, as I mentioned before, we'll be paying alot for "special" installation.

For me, that would be sort of like putting a dead fly on top an ice cream sundae--even though one could avoid the fly with his or her spoon, just having it was there would ruin the whole thing! Maybe I could glue 1/4" or 3/8" boards together, similarly to the way I will do for the top, in effect making my own "plywood" for the drawer bottoms? Perhaps this could be my general solution for those situations which call for plywood, particle board, or MDF? If I'm going to do general projects, I need a solution like that anyway. It appears that the subsitution I find may provide a "signature" for my work. Years from now, besides playing "What is this?" people can ponder "Why would anyone make a drawer bottom like this?" ; )
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Another beginners question: Why might I expect few defects on wider boards (intuitively, it seems like it would be easier to choose narrower boards with fewer defects)? Is it because the wider boards are necessarily cut from a deeper part of the log?
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

Wider boards are prone to lots of problems. Defects can be many or few, depending on the grade. The less defects, the more you pay. Besides that, wide boards are prone to more cupping/warping unless you get high quality quarter sawn lumber, which is really costly. Generally, your best bet is 6" width lumber. It is the cheapest, I guess because there is more of it, and more by grade than wider dimensions. In other words, a board foot of 2x6 is cheaper than a board foot of 2x12, in the same wood and same grade. Fortunately, you are generally better off using 2x6 material any way. Even at the same price, you are better off gluing up 4 or 5 2x6's for a top than a couple of 2x12's.
--
Jack
Using FREE News Server: http://www.eternal-september.org /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jack Stein wrote:

I was thinking of ripping them into 2.5 or 3" boards, then flipping the alternate ones (so that all the grain all runs in the same direction and gluing them with that configuration. Does that seem like a good strategy?
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

If you are gluing up a top, pay close attention to the end grain. If it's smiling at you, you will likely have trouble with cupping. Plenty tell you to alternate the smile up and down on every other board, but this doesn't work either. Best is to look for end grain that is straight up and down (quarter sawn) or slanted, but not semi-circular. You can find pieces like this in lumber piles if you look hard enough, or you can pay through the nose to buy it already separated out. Quarter sawn and rift cut pieces are in all regularly milled logs, but only a few in each log, unless the mill is specifically turning the logs for that purpose, which you pay for. For a work bench, I personally wouldn't worry too much about it, for a fancy desk, I might look harder for quarter sawn lumber. Cutting it into smaller widths should also help.
--
Jack
Using FREE News Server: http://www.eternal-september.org /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 24 Sep 2009 21:29:17 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

What about the $100 yearly maintenance charge for "descaling?" I almost got a tankless, but we have frequent power outtages. Our gas water heater is not dependant on electricity to run, but don't all natural gas tankless heaters need electricty?
When I ran the numbers the tankless cost more in the long run. If you are limited on space, then it makes sense. There is a LOT to go wrong with tankless heaters.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Phisherman" wrote:

Do you have unusually "hard" water?
Never heard of req'd annual "descaling".

Depends.
If the have a standing pilot, then no.
If they use 24VDC battery power for the piezo igniter, then no.
If they use 120VAC house power for the piezo igniter, then yes.

What goes wrong?
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.