recived this today from pop woodworking

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This link was in their email. http://www.popularwoodworking.com/video/making_cove_video?et_midY0607&rid#3687408
I have a hard time with this guy. I don't think he is very safe. He uses a 10 to 12 inch wide board and says its hard to reach over it... so my method is better.
I would not be using anything that wide. Maybe 4 to 5 inches. I put mine on both sides, but only the side closest is important
Next I would never use a push stick like that. The danger of the piece folding and dropping to the blade is too great. I use a flat bottomed push guide. Also I think the magnetic jig is on the wrong side of the blade and should be where his hand is.
Flame shields on.. but this is a woodworking topic... :-)
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On Tue, 20 Nov 2012 17:57:45 -0500, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

Agree 100%. A few years back, Huey was held to the fire for some other unsafe practices which don't immediately come to mind.
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On 11/20/12 4:57 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

I just wish woodworkers would realize there is no such word as heighth.
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On Nov 20, 5:58 pm, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

Push shoe rather than stick is a given. 1/4" of roof over the blade is asking for it to snap under the weight of his hand.
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On 11/20/2012 4:57 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

I prefer putting the fence in front of the blade. This is my setup for cove molding on the table saw:
http://e-woodshop.net/images/CornCab14.jpg
http://e-woodshop.net/images/CornCab15.jpg
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Swingman wrote:

Just curious, would you try to cut a long piece of crown like that?
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Screw a length of 1 x 12 to the bottom of the fence to support the crown past the saw table.
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On 11/20/12 11:31 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

You just support it like you would any other long piece of wood for any other cut. If you can configure some hold-downs, go for it, but it's not that necessary. It not much different than cutting dadoes other than the angle and having the fence in front helps with that. Speaking of dadoes, I used dado blades to cut mine.
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They're helpful for accuracy, since you're working over the heel of blade, which wants to lift the cove. Saves you from having to make extra passes. Nothing fancy, just a short bit of 1x tacked down to the rear block, if the block and workpiece are the same thickness.

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On 11/20/2012 9:16 PM, Bill wrote:

Sure ...as Mike says, just support it like you would any other long cut, like outfeed roller stands, etc.
No need to take any extraordinary steps.
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After watching the video and reading the comments, I just want to remind everyone that there are many ways to skin a cat per se. As long as the individual is doing the task that feels comfortable and safe to him/her, that is what matters. Whether he uses a wide board or a skinny board has no bearing on the instructions, as long as it straight. He didn't feel comfortable reaching over the board, so he'd rather be safe by having it on the far side. Good for him.
Regarding the push stick comments. that may be the only one he has or its the one he has that he felt comfortable with.
The video was made to show the technique used to make the molding. Everyone has different ways for doing things based on unknown factors and preferences. Just watch and learn from the video and don't be a movie critic.
Robin
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On 11/21/2012 12:55 PM, rlz wrote:

I'm sure that most of us, obviously after watching the video and reading the comments, obviously thank you from the bottom of our hearts for taking your obviously valuable time to point that out, obviously. :)
BTW, that begs the obvious question ... which end of the cat has the "per se"? ;)
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On 11/21/2012 12:55 PM, rlz wrote:

Actually many that have accidents felt comfortable with the methods that they used. So feeling safe does not equal being safe. Concerning the wide or skinny board, it damn well better be wide enough that it will not bend while you are feeding against it. Yes it needs to be straight and needs to remain straight.

Actually this is the guy that suggested several years ago to run your boards through a jointer with our push blocks. He feels that you need to feel what is going on with the wood while surfacing the board, so push them through with your bare hands. I'll pass.
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On 11/21/12 2:02 PM, Leon wrote:

I prefer to always feel a bit "unsafe" in my mind.... keeps me on guard and aware of safety procedures. I don't ever want to feel perfectly safe when running anything that can maim or kill me, know what I mean?

Wow. How is this guy still getting paid by someone? Reminds me of guys in here I've read saying they don't use ear protection because they like to "hear what's going on" with the power tools they're using.
I like to hear it, too... just 32dB quieter. :-)
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On 11/21/2012 3:02 PM, Leon wrote:

Yea me too. I have had kick back on the jointer. When hitting a knot or figured wood. Sometimes the board is not sitting flat (hence the need to joint) and when it hits tough wood it can shake, rattle and roll :-).. or scare the shit out of you. Nope, would not keep my hands there. I had the foam on my pushblock ripped off while trying to fight the kickback once. Only an idiot would stick his hands near that blade. Gives me the shudders thinking about getting too close to it.
BTW recovering from a dog bite (tried saving my dog from an attack), if the bite is like a jointer or tablesaw accident, Then I recommend you are better safe than sorry.
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On 11/21/2012 4:30 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

Ouch ... the 2nd most painful injury I ever had was a dog bite. My Dad's Staffordhire Bull Terrier (aka pit bull), bit completely through my left hand ... a long story.
First was, bareknuckle prizefighting in Oz way back when, my opponents tooth broke off in my hand and, being in the tropics, became infected quicker than you can say it ... an even longer story.
Third is ongoing ... stuck the tip of my ring finger on my left hand into the impeller of a leafblower last week ... to the bone. SOB does that thing still hurt.
... long enough now to make me want to reorder the above list, at least for the moment.
Heal fast, Bubba!
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On 11/21/2012 5:47 PM, Swingman wrote:

Thanks, between Sandy , a cold, the bite, work, I can't get any time in the shop. I feel like I lost a whole month.
The wife was proud of me for taking one for the dog... I should have kicked the other dog off instead of trying to grab him off.
My guy is 13 years old and gentle as anything. I didn't think he was going to take another attack. The previous one a neighbors dog had his head in his jaws and did lots of damage. That was an expensive hospital bill. He ripped his neck and head apart a freaking bloody mess.. I can't imagine the pressure on his head by those jaws. So this time I was there (different dog) and jumped right in after the attack.
Just out of curiosity... what did you have your finger into the impeller for? You're a smart guy, this had to have been a freak issue?
Yep, to the bone hurts, thats how deep the wounds were on both my hands. Turns out they don't stich them up... they leave them open in case of infection. And you have to take these Augmentin horse pills..
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On 11/21/2012 5:02 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

In my case I had showed up at our farm with my dog, a big Shepherd, in the back of my truck, not knowing my Dad's dog was out (he was gentle with people and kids, but would kill any another animal in a heartbeat, so he rarely was let loose on the farm).
There were other visitors, including a family with a toddler around 3 years old.
My dog jumped out of the the truck, Dad's dog attacked immediately.
They met right next to the toddler, who immediately ended up underneath both dogs locked in mortal combat. I jumped in, grabbed my dog by the scruff of the neck and started dragging them both, locked together by jaws, away from the baby, and just as I did, Dad's dog, in an attempt to get a better death grip on my dog's throat, grabbed my hand instead.
Managed to pull both dogs away the kid, but it took another five minutes to get my hand out of that dog's mouth ... he bit me on the other damned hand while I was trying ... we literally had to pry open his teeth with a stick to make him let go and get my hand out.
He had bitten completely through my hand in two places, from both sides, all the way from the back to the palm.
I sympathize with anyone bitten by an animal. Took about three months to heal properly (I was just out of the service with a brand new baby girl myself, so I was back shoeing horses about two weeks later ... had to, with a new baby of my own to feed). ;)

Yeah, real smart! The shop dummy was cleaning out the shop last Wednesday with an old leaf blower that was missing the guard over the impeller, bumped the lumber rack, leaf blower slipped, he adjusted his grip toward the other hand, just like that dog did ... and you know the rest. :(
Stupid is as stupid does.
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On 11/21/2012 8:44 PM, Swingman wrote:

Doh... sorry to hear that. It sucks when you don't have all your digits working for you. It seems as though when you are getting near healing you will start to ignore it... then we will do something dumb and bang it on something and set yourself back a few days...
A little hardware cloth over the impeller will be a usable new guard.. just screw it through the housing with washers...
As for the finger no more Swingy... now just stumpy.
Sheperd's are great dogs. What kind of dog (aside from not friendly to other dogs) was your dads?
Have a Happy Thanksgiving, it will give you an extra day to heal and not be in the shop injuring stumpy. Let someone else carve the Turkey.
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On 11/21/2012 8:31 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

He was a registered Staffordshire Bull Terrier. A bit stockier and more bulldog looking than the current Pit Bull here in the US.
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