Reciprocating Saw are they good?

I was not able to resist the other day when I saw this made in China Compact Reciprocating Saw on sale at Canadian Tire with a three years warranty. I quickly realized when I saw the price of quality blades that the cost of the saw is nothing compare to the blades. Up to now I have been using a portable circular carbide blade saw to cut hardwood palettes. I wonder how will my new R/Saw fair out and what type of blade should I be using?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How will it "fair out"? I presume you are asking if it will work well and hold up for the task. If so, no one here can tell you except for someone who may have used the same saw for similar work. But... that's hard because you don't say what your saw is. "made in China Compact Reciprocating Saw" is not really very definitive. Maybe someone from Canada has seen the same saw at CT, or better - has purchased one and can comment, but most other comments are going to be pretty vague.
As to the price of blades - you hit it on the head. Good blades are expensive and cheap blades don't work.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And another way of saying it is good blades will usually outlast the cheapie by a very good margin. I was able to cut the tops of about 36 pressure treated fence posts this summer and finished with a pretty sharp Milwaulee blade. I would have gone through 2 or 3 of the cheapos.
Ron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"made in China Compact Reciprocating Saw" is not really very definitive.
I agreed its not very definitive. The model is a compact reciprocating saw weighing about 11 pounds, 5A, 0 - 2500 SPM. This thinks weights more than my 7" Skill saw. With the Skill saw I can buy cheap carbide blade at around $3.00 to $4.00 CAD when on sales. Granted the carbide quality is not as good a "Freud" at ten time its cost but for cutting wooden palette it suit me fine.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

With the reciprocating saw it's the tooth pattern that matters most, not the cost of the alloy in the blade. Rather an assortment of four or five medium price types than two expensive, in my opinion. I like the swing blade action on my recip saw when working wood. Straight line for metal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If a circular saw works for you, stay with it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@nb.sympatico.ca wrote:

I don't know how useful it will be for woodworking, but for demolition and remodeling/contruction, they're invaluable. I had some discretionary funds and decided to buy one just because "I wanted one", and almost forgot I had it until I was replacing some electrical boxes in existing walls. It was a lifesaver for getting the old boxes out without enlarging the holes in the sheetrock. I would spend for the good blades though. If your chaiwanese saw is less powerful, the better blades will really help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When I bough it that about what I had in mind. Our garden patio door needs to be replaced. I figured that I will have to remove the old frame and place the new one in. The last I hear I that the new standardized overall dimensions are a little larger than the 20 years old one? The installer at my neighbour's house had to use force to press the new frame in. So this saw may come handy.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@nb.sympatico.ca wrote:

In general, blades that go back and forth do not cut as well as blades that move in a continuous motion. I have a Milwaukee recip saw that's very good. There are times when nothing else in my tool collection will do the job, and that's when I use it. It's faster and takes longer blades than my jigsaw, but it won't turn very much. It will reach into tight places where my circular saw can't go, but it isn't as fast. Most of the time, it hangs on the wall feeling unloved and unappreciated.
DonkeyHody "Never wrestle with a pig. You'll both get dirty, but the pig likes it."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@nb.sympatico.ca wrote:

Check the weight. Cheapies on reciprocating saws (and big grinders) are often a reasonable spec for performance, but they're twice the weight of a better quality equivalent. For a jerky reciprocating saw, that might even be an advantage!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@nb.sympatico.ca wrote:

How are things in New Brunswick? Fairing well? Love that province.
Naa.. if you're going to buy a recip saw, get a Milwaukee. They're cheap enough these days. The Porter Cable ones are pretty decent too. Canadian Tire is hit and miss... with more misses than hits. The Mastercraft legend has long since died. That stuff is a notch between Harbor Freight (Princess Auto) and Craftsman.
For my American friends: "fairing out" is Franglais. Kinda French, Kinda English. New Brunswick is totally bi-lingual. There is no such thing as 'hair' it is 'hairs' Three yearS warranty...why?...'cuz three is more than one.
r---> who is happy with Stphane Dion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The name of Milwaukee is projected as one of the top icon in tools. If I were earning my living with that type of tool for sure, I would spend the extra money. At one time, they were made in the US, now I do not know if they are still assembled in US or if they have outsourced everything. The last time I visited their plan in the US the manager told me that they were moving some wood patterns out of the US.
The manager informed me that they were having problems recruiting people. Most of the young people today are not interested to work in foundries and assembly lines for average wages. Yes CT is a hit and misses.
I use a electric VS drill for power sanding on my lathe. The first electric drill was a corded Makita and it only lasted 16 months. Now I am using a CT "Mastercraf" 6.25A corded drill. I have been abusing and using that low price drill for the last 24 months and it still working well. Maybe this one is a hit.
Anyway, if it stops working I still have 12 months left on the warranty and the store is close to my place. FWIW
wrote:

How are things in New Brunswick? Fairing well? Love that province.
Naa.. if you're going to buy a recip saw, get a Milwaukee. They're cheap enough these days. The Porter Cable ones are pretty decent too. Canadian Tire is hit and miss... with more misses than hits. The Mastercraft legend has long since died. That stuff is a notch between Harbor Freight (Princess Auto) and Craftsman.
For my American friends: "fairing out" is Franglais. Kinda French, Kinda English. New Brunswick is totally bi-lingual. There is no such thing as 'hair' it is 'hairs' Three yearS warranty...why?...'cuz three is more than one.
r---> who is happy with Stphane Dion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.