Rebuild Power Tool Batteries

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Both Ni-Cad and NiMh use a constant current technique to charge and most of these constant current chargers have a high saturation voltage to accomplish this. The cell voltages are identical for all practicable purposes so the added capacity of the NiMh should only take longer to charge.
writes>Any you guys rebuild your own NiCad's or NiMh

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Search rebuild power tool batteries. THere's a place that offers them - but the cost ain't cheap!
Supposedly, you can "zap" the old cells and bring them back to life. I've yet to try this myself.
Where you you get the batteries you mentioned? How much do they cost in small quantities?
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Don't. It kills them all. I did and regret it. I now have 9 unusable packs and 6 packs that only work for a while. Zapping them makes them die much quicker, IMHO.
My advice is to combine packs to extend life. Charge a pack, then wait a day and take apart the pack, and read individual cell voltage. You will usually have 2 or 3 cells fail to hold a charge before the rest. Cut the solder tab in the middle between cells, and put cells from another pack in their place and solder back together.
--
Jim in NC


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I got the batteries from ebay from the vendor "battery geek 1". The most cost efficient way for shipping is to buy 25 at a time.
RP
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