Reasons to be careful

Page 4 of 4  
wrote:

Speaking of which, any motor with brushes, spark. It is the nature of the beast, and capacitor start motors had a switch which opens up when a certain RPM is reached, and it too sparks.
One has to have a TEFC IIRC or an explosion proof motor to contain sparks on failure of a motor.
I am afraid this threads becoming a bit irrational. As many times as a saw blade has hit a nail, especially on a TS and thrown the spark into the dust bin below if it were a serious problem we'd of heard about it the day the women who invented the TS operated it. :)
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wrote:

Remember an accident is a chain of unlikely events aligning. Now if and when someone has a dust explosion from saw dust, the cause will not be static. The water heater, furnace or other open flame in the room yep that would do it. But what did "you" do to suspend that much dust in the air? Sugar on the other hand burns great and fast, powdered is best (do not try in a confined space).
Mark
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wrote:

Mark, that's called Caramelization. :)
Now have the little woman dump a 5lb bag into her Mixer bowl on Hi -speed.....naw.
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On 2/24/16 12:34 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Everything you mentioned is covered by insurance because the probability or likelihood of them happening is actually fairly high, in the context of this conversation.
When's the last time you saw insurance companies offering personal lightning/meteor strike policies. Heck, I should do that. It would the most lucrative profitable business ever.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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SWMBO has a friend who completely refuses to drive on interstate highways because they terrify her, and instead drives only on secondary roads -- where of course the risk of fatality is an order of magnitude higher.
Doesn't make sense to me.
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On 2/28/2016 12:03 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Logic does not apply. I know someone like that too. Even with someone else driving she does not like the highways. This is an otherwise intelligent, educated person.
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On 2/28/2016 11:03 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

Married to one of those ... me either.
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On Wed, 24 Feb 2016 08:45:56 -0500, Keith Nuttle

Durn Irishmen!
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DAMHIK but... You ever seen the bag blow off of a dust collector while you were planing a 10" wide board?? That SOB will make a mess in a couple of seconds that will take you hours to clean up. Particles from the planer would be much larger than dust but the built-up dust in the bag that escapes would certainly come close.
Larry
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When I was an 8th grader, a buddy of mine and I were hired by the local CO-OP to broom out the corn dust in the head houses of the grain elevators in my home town. They wanted it done because they feared a buildup of the dust might cause an explosion given the right conditions. We liked the job because no one came to look in on us because it was such a dirty job: after about five minutes of pushing brooms the headhouses would have so much powder in the air you couldn't see across the room. We also liked it because we could stand outside the headhouse and smoke cigarettes without fear of being caught. An additional elevator was built when I was a sophomore. It was about 60 feet taller than the old one so the design was to build a 24" diameter auger up to the head house on the new structure from the old one. One Saturday after the new elevator had been slipped and had been cured enough to drill concrete anchors into it, the engineers came up to the top of the old elevator where we had started cleaning. Of course we were smoking. It was cold outside so we were inside. They got off the man lift just as my buddy took a deep drag on his cig. They saw the glowing coals through the corn dust cloud and nearly trampled each other getting the hell back on the man lift to escape what they were sure to be a huge explosion. They apparently didn't squeal on us. But a few minutes later the elevator operator came up and said to stay up there until the dust cleared then come down.
When I was a Junior I told the story to my science teacher. Without profanity he called my buddy and I a couple of dumb asses and then explained spontaneous combustion. For the class he made an example. He took a 2 pound coffee can. He drilled a hole on the side near the bottom where he attached a length of tubing. He put a votive candle inside near the center of the bottom. Then he poured a ring of cornstarch around the candle. He lit the candle and put a lid on the can. He blew a short puff of air in the tube. The ball of fire was big enough to scorch the ceiling tiles!
Stupid is as stupid does.
Steve
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On 02/24/2016 6:30 PM, SnA Higgins wrote: ...

...
But not spontaneous combustion...that is like the haystack that catches itself on fire from internal heat buildup from decomposition owing to having been too damp when put up.
Explosive combustion such as you're describing requires an external ignition source; here the candle; possibly your cigarette butt in the story.
Is fortunate you didn't have a "boom!" moment, indeed. Perhaps were lucky in there being sufficient "dirt dirt" in the mixture besides the grain dust so that had a high aerial concentration but much of it wasn't that combustible, who knows...or maybe it "just wasn't your time" yet.
--



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On 2/24/2016 6:30 PM, SnA Higgins wrote:

Are you a ghost? ;~)
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wrote:

Great story, I was waiting for the punch line. And that is why reasonable precaution should not be thrown into the wind.
I'm glad neither of you were hurt, I have heard stories of elevator explosions.
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You any kin to the cajun John Wayne?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KK0K7tAYIc

Capt. Clay Higgins of Louisiana, a GREAT AMERICAN!
--
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into Antarctica and he's just a penguin's bitch.
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Check this out:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u2Fa1ESqGeE

It's worth watching all the way through ....
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On 2/24/16 10:43 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

How much you want to bet they didn't use a static spark for the ignition source?
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Wednesday, February 24, 2016 at 8:12:52 AM UTC+5:30, OFWW wrote:

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