Re: Workshops for RVs and Sailboats

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Think small and think minimalist.
Lugging a whole machine shop around with you is a lot simpler if you've restricted yourself to a mini-mill/-lathe, especially if you're driving a 1-ton dually and dragging a large-sized fifth-wheel RV.
For the U-Drive-It crowd [Class "A", "B", and "C" motorhomes] a modest shop can be set up in a cargo trailer.
Sailboats are a whole 'nother world: far more limited space, far more limited weight-carrying capability, a virtual absence of electricity, and the simple fact that sailboats travel on their sides...
When on the road with my dually/FW combination [21' of truck and 38' of trailer], I limit myself to hand-held power tools and hand tools. These I carry in a set of 4 Stanley tool boxes [used as organizers] within a cross-bed Al tool chest. They are organized as:
Pneumatic Impact wrenches Impact sockets Die Grinders Air Brush Supplies, etc. Wrenches Ratchets & Speedhandles Breaker bars Sockets Extensions Adapters Box-end Open-end Combination Woodworking Saws Screwdrivers Hammers Files & Rasps Chisels Spade and Forstner bits Sandpaper Squares Filler Putty Misc. "Stuff" Metalworking Hammers [Ball Pein, Drilling, Sledge] Files Drill Bits Cold Chisels Punches Carborundum stones Diamond Hones "Stuff"
Between the Stanley boxes, the Al box also holds a hand-held electric drill, a "drill press attachment" [that actually works reasonably well], a Dremel Detail Sander, a couple of 4.5" grinders, an electric circular saw, and a bunch of other "stuff" including a 10'x13' screen tent. <grin>
In a rear storage compartment of the trailer is my Dremel gear including several grinders with most of the available "goodies" from plunge router to drill press, planer to saw.
Oyea, my compressor [Porter-Cable C3151] rides by the truck's tailgate.
When "Shore Power" isn't available, I just fire up the 7KW Onan generator mounted in the front of the trailer.
Hopefully this may give you a few ideas...
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If it's on it's side, it's either broken or at the hand of a non-sailor.
Ed
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Ed Edelenbos wrote:

As for "limited weight carrying", most of the ones I'd be interested in carry a big chunk of lead or iron or on a few gold platers depleted uranium on the bottom.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Doesn't matter at all.
Dorothy's Hunter 38 displaces 16,600 pounds with 6,500 pounds of lead in the keel
Even that is limited displacement.
Richard
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cavelamb wrote:

By that logic an aircraft carrier has "limited dispalcement".
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J. Clarke wrote:

Absolutely!
And every time they up-anchor, they go on water rations.
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cavelamb wrote:

The water supply on a warship is not limited by displacement, it is limited by the capacity of the main condenser.
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Nope!
Only motorsailers under power and sailboats with furled sails will be upright.
Otherwise the wind pressure against the sails cause the mast(s) to lever the boat towards the downwind side.
About the only time a sailboat can remain upright while under weigh is on a downwind reach - usually with the sails at right angles to the wind and the skipper praying that the wind doesn't suddenly increase sharply. <grin>
FWIW [metal content] that wind-pressure-lever force is what prompted the invention of the Lead Keel to counterbalance that force...
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RAM wrote:

Heeled a bit is not "on its side" except to a lubber.
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"J. Clarke" wrote:

Or a machinist.
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wrote:

Define 'heeled"
Water coming in the scuppers...is ...on its side.
Gunner
"Not so old as to need virgins to excite him, nor old enough to have the patience to teach one."
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Gunner Asch wrote:

Depends on how much freeboard it has.
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And the strength + direction of the wind in relationship to sail area and the course of the boat. <grin>
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RAM wrote:

High freeboard and narrow beam means heeled way over to get water into the scuppers. Low freeboard and broad beam means it comes in at a much lower angle of heel.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Then you had better tack the keel too!
http://www.sailinganarchy.com/index_page1.php
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Most sailboats have a design heel angle. It is usually pretty shallow, at 10-20 degrees. At that angle the waterline is at its most advantageous (typically at it's longest), the keel is still able to do a good job of holding lateral movement, and (probably most importantly) the sails are where they are gong to do the most good... in the air catching wind.
Ed
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RAM wrote:

Timely topic for me.
We are trying to equip our sailboat without sinking her at the dock. That's a pretty decent startling point.
No way to take the shop aboard. Even a hiobby level garage based shop. No drill press, band saws, chop saw, welding stuff, angle grinders, etc. There just isn't room or displacement to do Noah's Arc of Tools.
So we do the best we can.
Organizing stuff is the biggest challenge. There is no place to store everything together, so the tools and materials get spread out.
I found a bunch of small zipper bags (9" long x 2 x 3) that neatly hold small tools.
Wrenches (SAE and Metric), sockets (1/4" drive, 3/8" - metric and SAE), drill bits (separated large and small) and driver bits, hex wrenches, etc. Dorothy got some "fabric paint" at the crafts store and neatly lettered the bags. These are packed into tool bags - as logically as possible. It makes finding the tool you need quickly a lot easier. Makes it easier to re-pack them as well.
Add specialty tools for the engine (29 HP Yanmar diesel and a small diesel gen set)
Cable cutters that can actually cut up to 1/4" stainless cable and "BB" chain links.
Come-Alongs A couple of smaller ones and a honkin' heavy duty one. I think I want another big one specifically for hauling in chain anchor rode. Use them like nippers to the capstan - like in the days of wooden ships (and iron men).
ratchet straps - 1-1/2" and 2" strap - in various lengths, but a few extra long ones that can go all the way around the hull.
"Yankee" screwdriver with extra flat and Phillips blades.
A hand operated drill - (brace?)
Several sizes of fine files for smoothing nicks in aluminum mast or boom.
Multimeters and light bulb style continuity testers.
Power tools are a problem. In emergencies you might not have power to run them!
So I have two Ryobi battery powered hand drills and 4 batteries. (on aboard and one at home - but if we go cruising, both will go)
Two (hand powered) wood saws and a hack saw with extra blades.
Line and cable tools. Fid and rope splicing tools. Cable clamps for the rigging cables, nicopress tool (big squeeze - not the little bolt operated one), thimbles, collars, etc.
Epoxy sticks that cure underwater - 1 dozen.
We have no pneumatic tools at all on the boat - yet. Not sure we will - but time will tell.
If we move her down to the coast, I plan to add a small Honda generator (~3000 watts) and a tiny Honda gas powered pump - 1" hose (from Northern Tools).
These are portable life insurance.
Even though they are gasoline powered. The outboard on the dinghy is gas too, so there is already some gasoline aboard. (outside - on the fan tail - with extinguishers handy!)
Still looking at a Hooka or "super snorkel" set up for working on the bottom. Gas powered? or Electric? The electric one draws 830 watts (10.5 amps - 120vac 60 cycle) I think that's the stopper on electric.
On and on, the list grows longer and heavier...
The question, of course, is what will you actually NEED - vs want. They are quite different.
Richard
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Speaking of sailing and shops...
Anybody heard from Glenn Ashmore? http://www.rutuonline.com /
I've not seen him on RCM for quite some time.
Karl
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cavelamb wrote:

First off since I didn't see the original post, are we talking hobby workshop or fix the boat in the middle of nowhere shop, as they have quite different requirements.
Second off, on your hookah setup, in the interest of saving space and weight, I'd suggest you home-brew this one as a combo unit, combining a small Honda gas engine with both a small water pump and a small oilless air compressor with filter to feed the hookah. This should save weight over two separate units. For the hoohah part you just need a suitable oilless compressor with filter, and a normal SCUBA second stage regulator on a long hose.
Also, 830W is 6.9A, not 10.5A which is probably starting surge. Either way, a Honda EU2000i will run that, My EU2000i runs my camper A/C of similar spec just fine.
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Pete C. wrote:

I came across that very question while writing the above.
Are you a machinist afloat? You'll need a Navy support vessel to carry a full machine shop.
Or are you a sailboat with some repair/make capability?

These are pretty much off the shelf items - at least at the local Northern Tools store. Keeping them separate gives the greater flexibility. The AC/DC den set can make power to run bumps and stuff, while an engine driven pump can go anywhere anytime - all by itself.
I like the hooka suggestion, Pete. My only beef with the oil-less compressors is NOISE (huh?). But a way to compress and store air would lend itself to a home brew hooka. The store-bought one is priced in Boat Units!

I noticed that. Their web specs.
I was thinking about running off of the house batteries - with an inverter. You couldn't dive without the genset running...
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